The Challenge: To Create More Value in All Negotiations

The Challenge: To Create More Value in All Negotiations

Tom Peters EXCELLENCE! THE WORKS A Half-Centurys Reflections/1966-2016 Chapter SIX: PUTTING PEOPLE

(REALLY) FIRST 01 January 2016 (10+ years of presentation slides at tompeters.com) tompeters.com) ! Contents/The Works/1966-2016/EXCELLENCE Chapter

Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter ONE: Execution/The All-Important Last 95% TWO: EXCELLENCE (Or Why Bother at All?)

THREE: The Strategy First Myth FOUR: (REALLY) First Things Before First Things FIVE: 34 BFOs/Blinding Flashes of the Obvious SIX: Putting People (REALLY!) First SEVEN: Tech Tsunami/Software Is Eating the World++ EIGHT: People First/A Moral Imperative Circa 2016 NINE: Giants Stink/Age of SMEs/Be The Best, Its the Only Market Thats Not Crowded Chapter TEN: Innovate Or Die/W.T.T.M.S.W./ Whoever Tries The Most Stuff Wins++ Chapter ELEVEN: Nine Value-added Strategies

Chapter TWELVE: Value Added/1ST Among Equals/DESIGN MINDEDNESS Chapter THIRTEEN: The PSF/Professional Service Firm Model as Exemplar/Cure All Chapter FOURTEEN: You/Me/The Age of BRAND YOU/Me Inc. Chapter FIFTEEN: Women Are Market #1 For Everything/ Women Are the Most Effective Leaders Chapter SIXTEEN: Leadership/46 Scattershot Tactics Chapter SEVENTEEN: Avoid Moderation!/Pursue Insanely Great/Just Say NO! to Normal Appendix: Library of Best Quotes

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE Thiscirca January 2016is my best shot. It took 50 years to write! (From 1966, Vietnam, U.S. Navy ensign, combat engineer/Navy Seabeesmy 1st management jobto today, 2016.) It is THE WORKS. THE WORKS is presented in PowerPoint formatbut it includes 50,000++ words of annotation, the equivalent of a 250-page book. The times are nuttyand getting nuttier at an exponential pace. I have taken into account as best I can (there really are no experts) the current context. But I have given equal attention to more or less eternal (i.e., human) verities that will continue to drive organizational performance and a quest for EXCELLENCE for the next several yearsand perhaps beyond. (Maybe this bifurcation results from my

odd adult life circumstances: 30 years in Silicon Valley, 20 years in Vermont.) Enjoy. Steal. P-L-E-A-S-E try something, better yet several somethings.* ** *** **** ***** *Make no mistake THIS IS A 17-CHAPTER BOOK which happens to be in PowerPoint format; I invite you to join me in this unfinishedhalf century to datejourney. **My Life Mantra #1: WTTMSW/Whoever Tries The Most Stuff Wins. ***I am quite taken by N.N. Talebs term antifragile (its the title of his most recent book). The point is not resilience in the face of change; thats reactive. Instead the idea is proactiveliterally getting off on the madness per se; perhaps I somewhat anticipated this with my 1987 book, Thriving on Chaos.

Chaos. ****Re new stuff, this presentation has benefited immensely from Social Mediae.g., I have learned a great deal from my 125K+ twitter followers; that is, some fraction of this material is crowdsourced. *****I am not interested in providing a good presentation. I am interested in spurring practical action. Otherwise, why waste your timeor mine? Note: There is considerable DUPLICATION in what follows. I do not imagine you will read this book straight through. Hence, to some extent, each chapter is a stand-alone story.

Epigraphs Business has to give people enriching, rewarding lives or it's simply not worth doing. Richard Branson Your customers will never be any happier than your employees. John DiJulius We have a strategic plan. Its called doing things. You miss 100% of the shots you never take. Ready. Fire. Aim.

Wayne Gretzky Ross Perot Execution is strategy. Avoid moderation. Herb Kelleher Fred Malek

Kevin Roberts Im not comfortable unless Im uncomfortable. Jay Chiat It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. John DiJulius on social media Courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart. Henry Clay

You know a design is cool when you want to lick it. This will be the womens century. Steve Jobs Dilma Rousseff Be the best. Its the only market thats not crowded. George Whalin

First Principles. Guiding Stars. Minimums. *EXECUTION! The Last 99%. GET IT (Whatever) DONE. *EXCELLENCE. Always. PERIOD. *People REALLY First! Moral Obligation #1. *EXPONENTIAL Tech Tsunami. GET OFF ON CONTINUOUS UPHEAVALS! *Innovate or DIE! WTTMSW/Whoever Tries The Most Stuff Wins! *Women Buy (EVERYTHING)! Women Are the Best Leaders! Women RULE!

*Oldies Have (All of) the Market Power! *DESIGN Matters! EVERYWHERE! *Maximize TGRs!/Things Gone RIGHT! *SMEs, Age of/Be the Best, Its the Only Market Thats Not Crowded *Moderation KILLS! ?! NEW WORLD ORDER

0810/2011: Apple > Exxon* 0724/2015: Amazon > Walmart** *Market capitalization; Apple became #1 in the world. **Market capitalization; Walmart is a Fortune 1 company the biggest in the world by sales. Phew. !

Contents/The Works/1966-2016/EXCELLENCE Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter Chapter

ONE: Execution/The All-Important Last 95% TWO: EXCELLENCE (Or Why Bother at All?) THREE: The Strategy First Myth FOUR: (REALLY) First Things Before First Things FIVE: 34 BFOs/Blinding Flashes of the Obvious SIX: Putting People (REALLY!) First SEVEN: Tech Tsunami/Software Is Eating the World++ EIGHT: People First/A Moral Imperative Circa 2016 NINE: Giants Stink/Age of SMEs/Be The Best, Its the Only Market Thats Not Crowded

Chapter TEN: Innovate Or Die/W.T.T.M.S.W./ Whoever Tries The Most Stuff Wins++ Chapter ELEVEN: Nine Value-added Strategies Chapter TWELVE: Value Added/1ST Among Equals/DESIGN MINDEDNESS Chapter THIRTEEN: The PSF/Professional Service Firm Model as Exemplar/Cure All Chapter FOURTEEN: You/Me/The Age of BRAND YOU/Me Inc. Chapter FIFTEEN: Women Are Market #1 For Everything/ Women Are the Most Effective Leaders Chapter SIXTEEN: Leadership/46 Scattershot Tactics Chapter SEVENTEEN: Avoid Moderation!/Pursue

Insanely Great/Just Say NO! to Normal Appendix: Library of Best Quotes Chapter SIX PUTTING PEOPLE (REALLY!) FIRST PEOPLE

BEFORE STRATEGY Lead article, Harvard Business Review. July-August 2015, by Ram Charan, Dominic Barton, and Dennis Carey ! Wow A long road traveled. I was involved in years of total intellectual warfare at McKinsey on this topic.

That is, I fought the strategy barons day and night, year in and year out. And now the HBR features a cover article co-written by McKinseys Managing Director (Barton) on the primacy of the once-ignored people stuff. Time flies. ! Or, rather, as I said: Wow

People: 1/4,096 6.1 There are 4,096 slides in my 2012, 23part MOAP/Mother Of All Presentations, three years in the making. ONE slide, by definition, had to come first. This one, a quote from the inimitable Richard Branson, was

#1 /4096 Business has to give people enriching, rewarding lives 1/4,096: excellencenow.com

Business has to give people enriching, or it's simply not worth doing. rewarding lives Richard Branson

#1 of 4,096. Think about it.* At length. Please. Please. Please. Please. P-l-e-a-s-e. (*Be a literalistthink very precisely

about what these exact words add up to. And what precisely they could [should!] mean to you and your colleagues.) NO: YES: People first. Business has to give people

enriching, rewarding lives or it's simply not worth doing.* *People first is terrific. But it is (a) vague and (b) doesnt go close to far enough. Enriching and rewarding lives is far more inclusiveand suggests far more than people as an asset from which growth and profits follow. People first is about means to an endenterprise success. But enriching and rewarding lives is also an end in and of itself. Of course, the good news is that the latter (enriching and rewarding) is also the

surest approach to mid- to long-term enterprise effectiveness and, yes, excellence. Make sense? (I hope and pray it does.) Human level capability has not turned out to be a special stopping point from an engineering perspective. Illah Reza Nourbakhsh, Robot Futures/2013

SOFTWARE IS EATING THE WORLD. Marc Andreessen/2014 The computers are in control. We just live in their world. Danny Hillis, Thinking Machines/2011 The intellectual talents of highly trained professionals are no more protected from automation than is the drivers left turn. Nicholas Carr, The Glass Cage: Automation and Us

All of this people stuff takes on much more urgency in the face of the tech change which is already mindboggling but is only in its adolescence. I will say much more about this in the next Chapter of this presentation, titled Tech Tsunami: Software Is Eating the

World++ You have to treat your employees like customers. Herb Kelleher, upon being asked his secret to success Source: Joe Nocera, NYT, Parting Words of an Airline Pioneer,

on the occasion of Herb Kellehers retirement after 37 years at Southwest Airlines (SWAs pilots union took out a full-page ad in USA Today thanking HK for all he had done) ; across the way in Dallas, American Kelleher was asked a thousand time for his/Southwests success secrets. His answer was invariant. And limited to the single sentence on the prior slidenot unlike Mr. Hiltons singular focus on that tucked in shower curtain.

(I know Herb pretty well. It aint for show.) EMPLOYEES FIRST, CUSTOMERS SECOND: Turning Conventional Management Upside Down Vineet Nayar/CEO/HCL Technologies Speaks for itself, right? Whos on Second?

Nobody comes home after a surgery saying, Man, that was the best suturing Ive ever seen! or Sweet, Instead, we talk about the people who took care of us, the ones who co-ordinated the whole procedureeveryone from the receptionist to the nurses to the surgeon. And we dont just tell stories around the they took out the correct kidney!

dinner table. We share our experiences through conversations with friends and colleagues and via social media sites. from the chapter What Does Come First? Patients Come Second: Leading Change By Changing the Way You Lead by Paul Spiegelman & Britt Berrett in the book

More. And very interesting take on the current age of patient-centered care. Wanna put patients first? Put staff first-er. We are a Life Success

Company. Dave Liniger, founder, RE/MAX The organization would ultimately win not because it gave agents more money, but because it gave them a chance for better lives. Phil Harkins & Keith Hollihan, Everybody Wins (the story of

RE/MAX) The RE/MAX version. hostmanship/ consideration renovation hosts.

Leaders as Interesting, eh hostmanship The path to a culture paradoxically does not go through the guest. In fact it wouldnt be totally wrong to say that the guest has nothing to do with it. True hostmanship leaders focus on their employees. What drives exceptionalism is finding the right people and getting them to love their work and see it as a passion. ... The guest comes into the picture only when you

are ready to ask, Would you prefer to stay at a hotel where the staff love their We went through the hotel and made a ... consideration renovation. Instead of redoing bathrooms, dining rooms, and guest rooms, we gave employees new uniforms, bought flowers and fruit, and changed colors. Our focus was totally on the staff. They were the ones we wanted to make happy. We wanted them to wake up every morning excited

work or where management has made customers its highest priority? about a new day at work. Jan Gunnarsson and Olle Blohm, Hostmanship: The Art of Making People Feel Welcome. Welcome. The guest comes into the picture only when you are ready to ask, Would you prefer to stay at a hotel where the staff love

their work or where management has made customers its highest priority? Dont skip over this, or just give it a nod. Re-read it. Ponder it. Discuss.

P-L-E-A-S-E. (Take your time.) NO: Clever NO: Memorable YES: Practical YES: Actionable. My gravest fear is your labeling slides like the one on hostmanship as

clever. My greatest hope is that you will ponder it, talk about it with colleagues, and in a few cases figure out action steps to make it real. Rocket Science. NOT.

If you want staff to give great service, give great service to staff. Ari Weinzweig, Zingermans Source: Small Giants: Companies That Choose to Be Great Instead of Big, Bo Burlingham As they say

NOT ROCKET SCIENCE. EXCELLENT customer experience depends entirely on EXCELLENT employee experience! If you want to WOW your FIRST

customers, you must WOW those who WOW the customers! G-E-N-I-U-S Im getting more and more cantankerous (short tempered!) about this: Job #1 (& #2 & #3)

is to abet peoples' personal growth. All other good things flow there from. My idea of a gen-u-ine "genius If you work your heart out to help people grow, they'll work their hearts out to give customers a great experience. "breakthrough" idea:

I repeat. This is rocket science. NOT (So why have I had to log 5,000,000 air miles saying something that ought to be obvious as the end of ones nose? Too many MBAs running loose? Sorry, low blow on my part. Fact is, I dont know where the disconnect is.)

Same same. not I will move on. Some say to me, Youve been saying the same thing for three decades. Even using some of the same slides for yearslike the Kelleher

quote. Why not move on? No. No. No. I and my like-minded colleagues have made some progress. But not enough by far. I will not move on until these notions are far far more ingrained than they are today. PERIOD.

Contrary to conventional corporate thinking, treating retail workers much better may make everyone (including their employers) much richer. Source: The Good Jobs Strategy, by M.I.T. professor Zeynep Ton. The Good Jobs Strategy: How the Smartest Companies Invest in

Employees to Lower Costs & Boost Profits Zeynep Ton, MIT Sloan School Notes: Cases all retail, include Costco and Trader Joes. $20.89 E.g., Costco: Average hourly pay 40% greater than #1 competitor, Sams Club.

Read this. The Big Duh. (I call it Should be sooooo obvious.) 1996-2014/Twelve companies have been among the 100 best to work for in the USA every year, for all 16 years of the lists existence; along the way, theyve

added/ 341,567 new jobs, or job growth of +172%: Publix Whole Foods Wegmans Nordstrom Cisco Systems Marriott REI

Goldman Sachs Four Seasons SAS Institute W.L. Gore TDIndustries Source: Fortune/ The 100 Best Companies to Work For/0315.15 Note: Fully

7/12ths of the best of the 100 best companies to work for in the USA are in so-called low wage components of the service industry. (So dont tell me, as many have, You can only do this sort of thing at the likes of Google.

Rubbish!) 100 Best Companies to Work for, Plus 3.5% per annum risk adjusted returns 1984-2009: Source: Fortune/The 100 Best Companies to Work For/0315.15/Alex Edmunds, Wharton

Staggering. (Do the math.) In a world where customers wake up every morning asking, Whats new, whats different, whats amazing? success depends on a companys ability to unleash initiative, imagination and

passion of employees at all levels and this can only happen if all those folks are connected heart and soul to their work [their calling], their company and their mission. John Mackey and Raj Sisoda, Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business Boss of one of the superstar firms just mentioned.

I didnt have a mission statement at Burger King. I had a dream. Very simple. It was something like, Burger King is 250,000 people, every one of whom gives a shit. Every one. Accounting. Systems. Not just the drive through. Everyone is in the brand. Thats what were talking

about, nothing less. Barry Gibbons, former CEO, Burger King To the point. No frills. Amen. (FYI: Barry Gibbons, as CEO, brought BK back from the brink some 25 years ago.) The greatest satisfaction for management has come not from the

Camellia financial growth of itself, but rather from having participated in the vast improvement in the living and working conditions of its employees, resulting from the investment of many tens of millions of pounds into the tea gardens infrastructure of roads, factories, hospitals, employees housing and amenities. Within the Camellia Group there is a strong aesthetic dimension, an intention that it should comprise companies and assets of the highest quality, operating from inspiring offices and manufacturing in state of the art

Above all, there is a deep concern for the welfare of each employee. This arises not only from a sense of humanity, but also from the conviction that the loyalty of a secure and enthusiastic employee will in the long-term prove to be an invaluable company asset. Camellia: A Very Different Company facilities.

($600M enterprise/$160M pretax profit/#3 tea producer/etc.) You can do it (people REALLY first) with tea estates, for heavens sakeand reap extraordinary profitability. (FYI: Camellia: A Very Different Company is

an uplifting book of the first order.) THE DREAM MANAGER by Matthew Kelly AN ORGANIZATION CAN ONLY BECOME THEBEST-VERSION-OF-ITSELF TO THE EXTENT THAT THE PEOPLE WHO DRIVE THAT ORGANIZATION ARE STRIVING TO BECOME BETTER-VERSIONSOF-THEMSELVES. A companys purpose is to become the-best-version-of-itself. The question is: What is an employees purpose? Most would say, to help the company

achieve its purposeBUT THEY WOULD BE WRONG. That is certainly part of the employees role, but an employees primary purpose is to become the-best-version-of-himself or herself. When a company forgets that it exists to serve customers, it quickly goes out of business. OUR EMPLOYEES ARE OUR FIRST CUSTOMERS, AND OUR MOST IMPORTANT CUSTOMERS. EVERY employee has a dream related to

their current job or not. Focusing on helping employees attain those dreams (WHICH MAY NOT BE JOB RELATEDA BIG DEAL) is simply the best way to create an environment where employees strive to improve themselves more or less each and every dayand in the process almost invariably serve each other, and the Client, with verve. (Admission: At first glance I thought how silly. At 3rd

through 10th glance I thought pure genius.) (The Dream Manager, presented in parable form, is based on a wildly successful industrial cleaning services company. I was fortunate to meet the publicity-shy CEO. To use the vernacular, shes the real deal.) Brand = Talent. Its obvious for football, symphony, university

faculties. Why not business? Our Mission TO DEVELOP AND MANAGE TALENT; TO APPLY THAT TALENT, THROUGHOUT THE WORLD, FOR THE BENEFIT OF CLIENTS; TO DO SO IN PARTNERSHIP; TO DO SO WITH PROFIT.

WPP Profit ROCKS. DERIVATIVE. Profit is: Talent is the driver. (I normally run from mission statements. This one, from the giant marketing services firm,

WPP, is about the only exception to that rule.) 6.2/ ! Book It Profit Through Putting People First Business Book Club Nice Companies Finish First: Why Cutthroat Management Is Overand Collaboration Is In,

by Peter Shankman with Karen Kelly Uncontainable: How Passion, Commitment, and Conscious Capitalism Built a Business Where Everyone Thrives, by Kip Tindell, CEO Container Store Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business, by John Mackey, CEO Whole Foods, and Raj Sisodia Firms of Endearment: How World-Class Companies Profit from Passion and Purpose, by Raj Sisodia, Jag Sheth, and David Wolfe The Good Jobs Strategy: How the Smartest Companies Invest in Employees to Lower Costs and Boost Profits, by Zeynep Ton, MIT Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love, by Richard Sheridan,

CEO Menlo Innovations Employees First, Customers Second: Turning Conventional Management Upside Down, by Vineet Nayar, CEO, HCL Technologies Patients Come Second: Leading Change By Changing the Way You Lead by Paul Spiegelman & Britt Berrett The Customer Comes Second: Put Your People First and Watch Em Kick Butt, by Hal Rosenbluth, former CEO, Rosenbluth International Its Your Ship: Management Techniques from the Best Damn Ship in the Navy, by Mike Abrashoff, former commander, USS Benfold Turn This Ship Around; How to Create Leadership at Every Level,

by L. David Marquet, former commander, SSN Santa Fe Small Small Giants: Companies That Choose to Be Great Instead of Big, by Bo Burlingham Hidden Champions: Success Strategies of Unknown World Market Leaders, Leaders, by Hermann Simon Retail Superstars: Inside the 25 Best Independent Stores in America, America, by George Whalin Joy at Work: A Revolutionary Approach to Fun on the Job, by Dennis Bakke, former CEO, AES Corporation

The Dream Manager, by Matthew Kelly The Soft Edge: Where Great Companies Find Lasting Success, by Rich Karlgaard, publisher, Forbes Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Profits, by Tony Hsieh, Zappos Camellia: A Very Different Company Fans, Not Customers: How to Create Growth Companies in a No Growth World, World, by Vernon Hill Like a Virgin: Secrets They Wont Teach You at Business School, School, by Richard Branson

Putting people really first. I rail about it nonstop and show you quotes from the likes of Richard Branson and John Mackey. In fact, there is a real and extensive literature around this pointa passel of books that give you the 300-page story of putting and keeping people REALLY first, and the payoffs associated therewith. Some exec teams, busy as they are, have created book clubs to enhance their growth. I suggest a full-blown Profit Through Putting People First Business Book Club.

Pick a handful of books off this listand meet once a month to talk about one of them. 6.3 ! What employees experience, Customers will. The best marketing is YOUR

CUSTOMERS WILL NEVER BE ANY HAPPIER THAN YOUR EMPLOYEES. happy, engaged employees. John DiJulius, The Customer Service Revolution: Overthrow Conventional Business, Inspire Employees, and Change the World

Every now and then I come across a perfect sentence that describes a seminal point with totaland economicalclarity. This was one of those, that I came across early in 2015. Perfect! Perfectly said! (De facto all you need to knowor damn close to it.)

(John DiJulius is a wildly successful entrepreneur who created a top ranked chain of spasalons. He now spends most of his time on customer-service trainingwith clients such as Starbucks and Nordstrom.) Customers will only love a company that loves its employees. David Spellman: My corollary is, How we treat one another is ultimately how we treat the clients.

BCMac: Ive always said You cant remain a great company on the outside if you arent one on the inside. Vala Afshar: Ditto. (From a twitter conversation I initiated on

this.) The 7-Step Method 6.4 7 Steps to Sustaining Success You take care of the people. The people take care of the service. The service takes care of the customer.

The customer takes care of the profit. The profit takes care of the re-investment. The re-investment takes care of the re-invention. The re-invention takes care of the future. (And at every step the only measure is EXCELLENCE.) 7 Steps to Sustaining Success: And it starts with You take care of the people.

Q.E.D. 6.5 LEADERS DO PEOPLE.

Tom, you left out one thing I gave a speech in Dublin which included a list of 50 leadership traits. After the speech, the head of a major marketing services company and I were chatting over, yes, a Guinness. He said my list had been terrificuh, except I left out the most important

item. Which was , I intoned. Tom, you left out one Leaders enjoy leading! thing

This odd point is in fact profound. If you dont get off on the messy people stuff and politics and uncertainty and ambiguity well, you might have chosen the wrong jobleading, that is. LEADERS DO PEOPLE.

PERIOD. Anon. And then I came across this. Superb! Yup. Some get off on the people stuff. And some DONT.

By definition, the manager cannot do all the work herself. Hence, effectively, the manager's sole task is to make othersONE AT A TIME successful. (in

pursuit of organizational goals) (and collectively) Fact. Q.E.D. Jim [Riggleman] is a great handler of a game. But you can get seven fans Its

what happens after you come down the dugout steps after a game that really matters. Thats when you that can handle a game. find out whos a big league manager. Thats when Jim goes in his office. He thinks his day is over. Quote in Washington Post by Washington Nationals source upon precipitous resignation by manager Jim Riggleman

Some miss the boat. Or the whole damn harbor. This is an interesting way of putting it. You CHOSE to be a boss/leader. (You were not forced.) Hence you CHOSE to devote 100% of the rest of your professional career

to DEVELOPING REMEMBER: PEOPLE. Fact. Q.E.D. "When I hire someone, that's

when I go to work for them. John DiJulius, "What's the Secret to Providing a World-class Customer Experience" Repeat: Leaders do people.

The role of the Director is to create a space where the actors and actresses can become more than theyve ever been before, more than theyve dreamed of being. Robert Altman, Oscar acceptance speech

Repeat: Leaders do people. It holds in Hollywood. EQUALLY* And it holds at the car dealers. ! (*Damn it )

Training = Investment 6.6 1! # #1 =

#1* #1 6/2/3 * Hes the quintessential old pro. No trains and trains and trainsand trains some more. (Most

matter. He still of the training gigs are performed in small, out-of-the-way places.) Practice! Training! Growth! It aint a walk in the parkand it applies to each and every one of us. That goes 10 X

100X ( ?) in 2016. Basketball coach John Wooden, perhaps the best coach of I was never much of a game coach, but I was a pretty good

practice coach. anything, ever: Hall of fame football/NFL coach Bill Walsh on preparation: The score takes care of itself. (This was also the title of Walshs last book.) Two pretty damn good trainers. The

outcome of the game per se is (more or less) simply a byproduct of peerless training. Does this translate to business? What a silly* (*I wish) question, eh? 2X Recession comes. Most retailers cut back on training to save money. CONTAINER STORE

DOUBLES training for in-store customer-contact employees. Perfect time for best effort++ with any customers who still come our way, they say. And the only plausible path is to double down on helping our closest-to-the-customer people grow. (FYI: A few years ago Container Store was ranked as the #1 company

to work for in the $18 trillion USA economy.) 3-star generals worry In the Army, about training. In most businesses, it's a hohum mid-level staff function.

FACT. Why (why why why why why why why why why is intensiveextensive training obvious for the army & navy & sports teams & performing why why why why)

not arts groupsbut for the average business? Is your CTO/Chief Training Officer (Do you even have a CTO?) your top paid C-level job (other than CEO/COO)? Are your top trainers

paid/cherished as much as your top marketers/ engineers? Most firms dont even have a CTO. For shame. Is your CTO/Chief Training Officer your top paid C-level job (other than CEO/COO)? If not, why not? Are your top trainers paid as much as your top marketers and engineers?

If not, why not? Are your training courses so good they make you giggle and tingle? If not, why not? Randomly stop an employee in the hall: Can she/he meticulously describe her/his development plan for the next 12 months? If not, why not?

Why is your world of business any different than the (competitive) world of rugby, football, opera, theater, the military? If people/talent first and hyper-intense continuous training are laughably obviously for them, why not you? Training often doesnt get the attention it ought to get because the training course portfolio is far from scintillating. (Its called a vicious circle: Low funding. Lousy courses. Poor evaluations. Even less funding.) I believe the aim must be

UNADULTERATED EXCELLENCE & WOW IN EVERY TRAINING OFFERING. (Damn it.) ! (I repeat: Damn it ) Someone at a seminar challenged me on this. Said it was

unrealistic and, by the way, what does tingle mean. I pointed to my sophomore year in college. For us engineers, including civil engineers like me, an introductory chemistry course was required. Most of us looked forward to it as the equivalent of a 4-month long root canal. We had two well known professors, Michell Sienko and Robert Plane. They were scholars of the first order and simultaneously entertainers of the first order. Bottom line: By the end of the course, probably half of us (among hundreds) wanted to be chemistry majors. Ten years later the same sort of lightning struck courtesy an econ prof, Keith Lumsden, at the Stanford business school.

That is, there are great teachers and great coursesand I do not understand why the corporate world cant develop or recruit the Sienkos and Planes and Lumsdens. Billions/even trillion$$$ are at stakeand great profs concocting great courses could do wonders to, say, recruitment and retention and productivity. As to tingle, Im looking for something beyond very good; Id accept earthshaking or mindblowing or, for sure supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. Is your CTO/Chief Training Officer your top paid C-level job (other than CEO/COO)?

If not, why not? Are your top trainers paid as much as your top marketers and engineers? If not, why not? Are your training courses so good they make you giggle and tingle? If not, why not? Randomly stop an employee in the hall: Can she/he meticulously describe

her/his development plan for the next 12 months? If not, why not? Why is your world of business any different than the (competitive) world of rugby, football, opera, theater, the military? If people/talent first and hyper-intense continuous training are laughably obviously for them, why not you? her or

his boss should be sternly reprimanded ASAP. (I would And if the answer is No say firedbut you might accuse me of over-the-top-ism. Heaven forbid.) Your (bosss) job is (much) safer if every one of your team members is committed to

Boss & RPD: RPD/Radical Personal Development. Actively support one and all! The boss is the big winner.

(A winner at workand a winner in life as a useful human being.) The key difference between checkers and chess is that in checkers the pieces all move the same way, whereas in chess all the pieces Discover what is unique about each person and capitalize on it.

move differently. Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know No matter what the situation, [the great managers] first response is always to think about the individual concerned and how things can be arranged to help that individual experience

success. Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know No generics! Each one of your (bosss) folks must be treated as an individual with support tailored accordingly. (I hate to analogize business to parenting; its not the same. However, you would never take the same approach with your kids. Each one is

VERY different than the other/s.) I start with the premise that the function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more followers.

Ralph Nader Leadership opportunities aboundfor all of us, all the time. (See Betsy Myers wonderful Take the Lead: Motivate, Inspire, and Bring Out the Best in Yourself and Everyone The idea per Mr. Nader is to get everyone focused on growth and thinking and acting like a leader. Development accelerates and the customer is the ultimate

beneficiary of a skilled staff that seizes the moment without muss, fuss, or order shouting. Around You.) Leaders all! (Of course!) DDOs/ Deliberately Developmental Organizations

These companies operate on the foundational assumptions that adults can grow, that not only is attention to the bottom line and the personal growth of all employees desirable, but the two are interdependent. Both profitability and individual development rely on structures that are built into every aspect of how the company operates. Decurion and Bridgewater [cases] offer a form of proof that the quest for business excellence and the search for personal

realization need not be mutually exclusiveand can, in fact, be essential to each other. E.g., At Bridgewater Associates, every employee (new hire to CEO) has a crew that supports his or her growth, both professionally and personally. Source: Making Business Personal, Robert Kegan, et al., HBR/04.14 Amen. Wow.

Gamblin Man >> 5 of 10 CEOs see training as expense rather than investment. Bet #2: >> 5 of 10 CEOs see training as defense rather than offense. Bet #3: >> 5 of 10 CEOs see training as necessary evil rather than strategic

opportunity. Bet #1: >> 8 of 10 CEOs, in 45-min tour dhorizon of their biz, would NOT mention training. Bet #4:

My odds are not speculative. Ive tested this. (Alas.) (If you had any clue as to just how much this pisses me off ) What is the #1 reason to

go berserk over training? What is the best reason to go bananas over training? GREED. (It pays off.) (Also: Training should be an official part of the

R&D budget and a capital expense.) Training #1: Bottom Line NOBODY gets off the hook! Training & Development Maniac applies as much to the 4-person

business as to the chief leader of the of the 44,444-person business. The 4-person firm chief says, Hey I can barely make ends meet. Training? Get serious. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong.

In the 4-person outfit each employee 1,000X counts more than in the giant firm. The payoff from superb training can be no less than staggering. The topic is probably the oldest and biggest debate in

What is more important: How well you hire, or the training and culture you bring your employees into? Customer service. While both are very important, 75 percent is the Customer service training

and the service culture of your company. Do you really think that Disney has found 50,000 amazing service-minded people? There probably arent 50,000 people on earth who were born to serve. Companies like Ritz-Carlton and Disney find good people and put them in such a strong service and training environment that doesnt allow for accept anything less than excellence. John DiJulius, The Customer Service Revolution: Overthrow Conventional Business, Inspire Employees, and Change the World

As John DiJulius says, this is a controversial point. But I would tend to lean (hard) in his direction in many if not most situations. Google? Maybe not. But Google is 5 standard deviations away from the normat least. Hence, for most of us nothing is more important than training (and culture). training, TRAINING and M-O-R-E

T-R-A-I-N-I-N-G CINCPAC/Commander-In-Chief Pacific Chester Nimitz to CNO/Chief of Naval Operations Ernest King/1943 (punctuation Nimitzs, NOT mine); when Pearl Harbor occurred, U.S. Navy preparation was found wantingthe crews training, Nimitz firmly believed, was more important than the number of available war ships. I am more or less

purple with rage at the generic disregard of training in the private sector. 6.7.1 Hiring Development can help great people be even better but

if I had a dollar to spend, Id 70 cents spend getting the right person in the door. Paul Russell, Director, Leadership and

Development, Google the most important aspect of business and yet remains woefully misunderstood. In short, hiring is Source: Wall Street Journal, 10.29.08,

review of Who: The A Method for Hiring, Geoff Smart and Randy Street So do you consider yourself a full-bore PROFESSIONAL when it comes to hiring?

(Take care in answering, please.) (If you buy something like the 70%, what could be more important?????) The topic is probably the oldest and biggest debate in What is more important: How well you hire, or the training and culture you bring your employees into? Customer service.

While both are very important, 75 percent is the Customer service training and the service culture of your company. Do you really think that Disney has found 50,000 amazing service-minded people? There probably arent 50,000 people on earth who were born to serve. Companies like Ritz-Carlton and Disney find good people and put them in such a strong service

and training environment that doesnt allow for accept anything less than excellence. John DiJulius, The Customer Service Revolution: Overthrow Conventional Business, Inspire Employees, and Change the World Remember/ponder: An alternate view. So I asked a Starbucks regional manager why her front line folks always seemed to have a smile

in Saudi Arabia as much as in Boston. And she said Its simple, really, Tom. Hire for s, and, above all,

promote for s. Starbucks regional manager, on why so many smiles at Starbucks shops Oh, uh, sure (Sorry for being such a dunderhead.) We look for ...

listening, caring, smiling, saying Thank you, being warm. Colleen Barrett, former President, Southwest Airlines Same same Southwest Airlines! (Gawd, is this ever important!) (Gawd, is this unusual!)

NOT P-L-E-A-S-E take this to heart in general, but as to the SPECIFICS. (These words per seas written on the prior slide are the crux of the matter.) Put it (e.g., the likes of smiles in a way that lights up a room)

FORMAL in the hiring criteria list. DAMN IT! Could you please please please consider plain English? Example:

Not engages the interviewer in a positive fashion. SMILES A LOT. Instead: The ultimate filter we use [in the hiring process] is that we only hire nice people. When we finish

assessing skills, we do something called running the gauntlet. We have them interact with 15 or 20 people, and everyone of them have what I call a blackball vote, which means they can say if we should not hire that person. I believe in culture so strongly and that one bad apple can spoil the bunch. There are enough really talented people out there who are nice, you dont really need to put up with people who act like jerks.

Peter Miller, CEO Optinose (pharmaceuticals) do not Nice guys finish last. (And nice is the #1 lubricant for an effectivecooperative corporate culture.) (Also: Source is a pharmaceutical company, not Disneyworld.) When we talk about the

qualities we want in people, empathy is a big one. If you can empathize with people, then you can do a good job. If you have no ability to empathize, then its difficult to help people improve. One way that empathy manifests itself is courtesy. Its not just a Everything becomes harder.

veneer of politeness, but actually trying to anticipate someone elses needs and meeting them in advance. Stewart Butterfield, co-founder/CEO Slack, founder Flickr Nice on steroids: Empathetic! Observed closely during Mayo Clinic employment interviews (for renown surgeons as well as others): The frequency of use of

I or We . More on plain English? Not exhibits traits associated with good teamwork.

We more than I. Instead: Uses (FYI: Love this!) (FYI 2: The Mayo Clinic book, as suggested earlier, is SUPERB.) I cant tell you how

many times we passed up hotshots for guys we thought were better people and watched our guys do a lot better than the big names, not just in the classroom, but on the fieldand, naturally, after they graduated, too. Again and again, the blue chips faded out, and our little up-and-comers clawed their way to allconference and All-America teams. Bo Schembechler & John Bacon), Recruit for Character, Bos Lasting Lessons

Character/better people: Again, be explicit.; use plain English. When assessing candidates, the first thing I looked for was energy and Does she talk about the thrill of getting things done, the obstacles overcome,

the role her people played or does she keep enthusiasm for execution. wandering back to strategy or philosophy? Larry Bossidy, Execution Focused on implementation. (This [sort of] stuff is actually easy to observepresence or absenceif youre on the lookout.)

What is your most marked characteristic? Vanity Fair: Mike Bloomberg: Curiosity. Hire for curiosity.

EXPLICITLY. E-X-P-L-I-C-I-T-L-Y. LISTENING CARING SMILING SAYING THANK YOU BEING WARM NICE EMPATHETIC

WE (not I) CHARACTER (better people) CURIOUS IMPLEMENTATION (not strategy) Pretty good list of traits, eh? Again: Key words are Plain English (use these words, kind,

we, etc.) Andrew Carnegies Tombstone Inscription Here lies a man Who knew how to enlist In his service Better men than himself. Source: Peter Drucker, The Practice of Management Such a

VERY And oh-so-rare. (Alas.) big deal. Hiring: What About the Liberal Arts

Majors? 6.7.2 MANAGEMENT AS A TRULY LIBERAL ART Peter Drucker Response to question on his (Peter Druckers) most important

contribution: I focused this discipline on people and power; on values, structure, and constitution; and above all, on responsibilities THAT IS, I FOCUSED THE DISCIPLINE OF MANAGEMENT ON MANAGEMENT AS A TRULY LIBERAL ART. (18 January 1999)

Hard is Soft. Soft is hard. Management, according to the master/Peter LIBERAL ART.* ** Drucker, is a (*P-l-e-a-s-e convey that to the business schools fat chance getting an iota of reaction.) (**The consequences of this are enormous. The

impact on people practices, for one giant thing, are mind bogglingstarting, obviously with hiring.) Forbes/Cover/17 August 2015 THE NEW GOLDEN TICKET: YOU DONT HAVE TO CODE TO GET RICH. HOW LIBERAL ARTS GRADS ARE CONQUERING SILICON VALLEY Headlines:

Revenge of the Philosophy Majors: In Silicon Valley brilliant coding and engineering is a given. The real value added, increasingly, comes from the people who can sell and humanize. Which is why tech startups suddenly crave liberal arts majors. The job of a software engineer is getting more automated. Whats far more labor intensive is the job of figuring out what technology users want. That 'Useless' Liberal Arts

Degree Has Become Tech's Hottest Ticket. Source: title, Forbes cover story (17 August 2015) 2015 Software companies are discovering that liberal arts thinking makes them stronger. People without a tech degree may already

may be benefiting the most from techs boom. Forbes cover story, That 'Useless' Liberal Arts Degree Has Become Tech's Hottest Ticket. (17 August 2015) 2015 One of the most glistening of techs ten-digit unicorn startups, boasting 1.1 million users and a private market valuation of $2.8 billion. If youve used Slacks team-based messaging software, you know that one of its catchiest

innovations is Slackbot, a helpful little avatar that pops up periodically to provide tips so jaunty that it seems human. Such creativity cant be programmed. Instead, much of it is minted by one of Slacks 180 employees, Anna Pickard , the 38-year-old editorial director. She earned a theater degree from Britains Manchester Metropolitan University before discovering that she hated the constant snubs of auditions that didnt work out. After winning acclaim for her blogging, videogame

writing and cat impersonations, she found her way into tech, where she cooks up zany replies to users who type in I love you, Slackbot. Its her mission, Pickard explains, to provide users with extra bits of surprise and delight. The pay is good; the stock options, even better. Forbes cover story, That 'Useless' Liberal Arts Degree Has Become Tech's Cracks in techs Engineering Uber Alles edifice.

As technology takes over more of the facts-based, rules-based, left-brain skillsknowledge worker skills employees who excel at human relations are emerging as the new it men and women. More employers are recognizing they need workers who are good at team building, collaboration, and cultural sensitivity. According to research from Oxford Economics. Other research shows that the most effective teams are not those whose members boast the highest IQs, but rather those whose members are most sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of others. MIT data

science professor Sandy Pentland [Human Dynamics Lab] says, Its not simply the brightest who have the best ideas; it is those who are best at harvesting them from others. Its not only the most determined who drive change; it is those who most fully engage with like-minded people.. And it is not wealth and prestige that best motivates people; it is respect and help from peers. Source: Fortune/Jeff Fortune/Jeff Colvin/The 100 Best Companies to Work For/0315.15

Hmmm. Interesting perspective. Hardly mainstream. Perhaps accurate. The Portable Superstar Myth 6.7.3/

Reliance on stars is a highly speculative practice, since we really dont know very much about what drives outstanding individual performance. Chapter 3 presents our most central and global finding about the effects of changing employers on star analysts performance. In short, exceptional performance is far less portable than is widely believed. Global stars experienced an immediate degradation in

performance. Even after five years at a new firm, star analysts who changed employers underperformed comparable star analysts who stayed put. Boris Groysberg, professor of business administration, Harvard, Chasing Stars: The Myth of Talent and the Portability of Performance Hiring stars is not the answer to all your performance needs! Context/culture matters.

The topic is probably the oldest and biggest debate in What is more important: How well you hire, or the training and culture you bring your employees into? Customer service. While both are very important, 75

percent is the Customer service training and the service culture of your company. Do you really think that Disney has found 50,000 amazing service-minded people? There probably arent 50,000 people on earth who were born to serve. Companies like Ritz-Carlton and Disney find good people and put them in such a strong service and training environment that doesnt allow for accept anything less than excellence. John DiJulius, The Customer Service Revolution: Overthrow Conventional Business, Inspire Employees, and Change

the World Remember: 75% . 6.8 Quiet

We live with a value system that I call the Extrovert Idealthe omnipresent belief that the ideal self is gregarious, alpha, and comfortable in the spotlight. The archetypal extrovert prefers action to contemplation, risk-taking to heed-taking, certainty to doubt. We think that we value individuality, but all too often we admire one type of individual Introversion is now a second-class personality The Extrovert Ideal has been documented in many studies. Talkative people, for example, are rated as smarter, better looking, more interesting, and more desirable as friends.

Velocity of speech counts as well as volume: We rank fast talkers as more competent and likeable than slow ones. But we make a grave mistake to embrace the Extrovert Ideal so unthinkingly. As the science journalist trait. Winifred Gallagher writes, The glory of the disposition that stops to consider stimuli rather than rushing to engage with them is its long association with intellectual and artistic achievement. Neither E = mc squared or Paradise Lost was

dashed off by a party animal. Even in less obviously introverted occupations, like finance, politics, and activism, some of the greatest leaps forward were made by introverts figures like Eleanor Roosevelt, Warren Buffett and Gandhi achieved what they did not in spite of but because of their introversion. Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking made a profound impact Susan Cains

on me. We tend to favor the noisy ones and thence downplay the power of the 50% amongst us who are the quiet ones. I.e., we blow off (or, at least, undervalue) almost 50% 0f the talent pool.

! Talk about a missed opportunity Among the most effective leaders I have encountered and worked with in half a century, some have locked themselves into their offices and others were ultra-gregarious. Some were quick and impulsive, some studied the situation and took forever to come to a decision. The

one and only personality trait the effective ones did have in common was something they did not have: They had little or no charisma, and little use for the term. Peter Drucker, in Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking Wow.

VERY ( ) strong language. From a rather reliable source. [Adam Grant] predicted extroverts would be better telemarketers, but it turned out there was zero correlation extroversion levels and

cold-calling prowess. The extroverts would make these wonderful calls, but theyd often be distracted and lose focus. The introverts would talk quietly, but boom, boom, boom they were making the calls; they were focused and determined. Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking

Introverts. Thoughtful. If you are a manager, remember that one third to one half of your workforce is probably introverted, whether they appear that way or not. Think twice about how you design your organizations office space. Dont expect introverts to get jazzed up about open office plans or, for that matter, lunchtime birthday parties or teambuilding these

are the people who can help you think deeply, strategize, solve complex problems, and spot canaries in your coal mine. retreats. Make the most of introverts strengths Also remember the dangers of the new groupthink. If its creativity youre after, ask your employees to solve problems alone before sharing their ideas Dont mistake assertiveness or elegance for good ideas. If you

have a proactive workforce (and I hope you do), remember that they may perform better under an introverted leader than under an extroverted or charismatic one. Susan Cain, Introverts. Thoughtful. The introverts and extraverts participated about equally,

giving the lie to the idea that introverts talk less. But the introvert pairs tended to focus on one or two serious subjects of conversation, while the extrovert pairs lighter-hearted and wider-ranging topics. Conversational pairings/experiment: Susan Cain,

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking Introverts. Thoughtful. In a gentle way, you can shake the world. Gandhi (from Susan Cain,

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking) Introverts. Thoughtful. The next time you see a person with a composed face and a soft voice, remember that inside her mind she might be solving an equation, composing a

sonnet, designing a hat. She might, that is, be deploying the power of quiet. Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking Introverts. Thoughtful. Open-plan workers are more likely to suffer

from high blood pressure and elevated stress levels and get the flu; they argue more with their colleagues. Introverts seem to know these things intuitively and resist being herded together. Video game design company Backbone Entertainments creative director: We switched over to cubicles [from a warehouse format] and were worried about it. Youd think in a creative environment people would hate that. But it turns out they prefer having nooks and

crannies they can hide away in and be away from everybody. Source: Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking The results were unambiguous. The men in 23 of the 24 groups produced more ideas when they worked on their own than when they worked as a group. They also produced ideas of equal or higher quality

when working individually. And the advertising executives were no better at group work than than the presumably introverted research scientists. Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking Open offices take a hit. Hooray!

(Theyd kill me.) Most inventors and engineers I have met are like metheyre shy and they live in their heads. They work best when they are alone , and can control an inventions design. Im going to give you some advice that might be hard to take: WORK ALONE. Youre

going to be best able to design revolutionary products and features. from Steve Wozniak, in Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Cant Stop Talking !

Woz Quiet. Thoughtful. M.I.A. (So??) 6.9 Promotion

2/Year = Legacy Your legacy is achieved and maintained to a great extent by your promotion decisionsabout two per year on average. In a five-year stint, thats 10 decisions that make or break you

that define 5 years of your life. DO YOU ACT ACCORDINGLY? (invest in the promotion decision-making process) (No glib answer, please.) (I know youre serious about this.

?) BUT are you serious enough Promotion Decisions life and death decisions Source: Peter Drucker, The Practice of Management

A promotion decision is akin to an acquisition decision. The same degree of care therewith should be exercised. A man should never be promoted to a managerial position if his vision focuses on peoples weaknesses rather than on their

strengths. Peter Drucker, The Practice of Management One more that Drucker got right. Profoundly importantway beyond the promotion issue. 6.10 Evaluation

(53 = 53) EVALUATING #1 PEOPLE = DIFFERENTIATOR Source: Jack Welch, now Jeff Immelt, on !!!!)

GEs top strategic skill ( In most companies, the Talent Review Process is a farce. At GE, Jack Welch and his two top HR people visit each division for a day. They review the top 20 to 50 people by name. They talk about Talent Pool The Talent Review Process is a contact sport at GE;

it has the intensity and the importance of the budget process at most companies. strengthening issues. Ed Michaels, War for Talent A mouthful, eh? (And you and yours?)

53 = 53* *53 people = 53 (different (different)) evaluation criteria There are, for example, 53 players on a teams active duty NFL (USA pro football) roster. Each player has a unique role to fulfill on the team. (Duh.) Each one is at a different place in their personal and professional development.

No two are alike. (Duh.) A generic evaluation scheme would literally be INSANE. One needs 53 different measures for 53 different players. (DUH.) People are NOT Standardized.

Their evaluations should NOT be standardized. EVER. Standardized Evaluations? NFL players? World Cup team players? Actors in a theater company? Dancers in a ballet

company? Etc. Etc. Standardized evaluations are (repeat) INSANE. Some Thoughts on EVALUATIONs *Do football coaches or theater directors use a standard evaluation form to

assess their players/actors? Stupid question, eh? *Does the CEO use a standard evaluation form for her VPs? If not, then why use one for front line employees? *Evaluating someone is a conversation/several conversations/a dialogue/ongoing, not filling out a form once every 6 months or year. *If you (boss/leader) are not exhausted after an evaluation conversation, then it wasn't a serious conversation. *Does it take you at least a day to prepare for a 1-hour evaluation meeting? If not, you are not serious about the meeting. *I am not keen on formal high-potential employee I.D. programs. As manager, I will treat all team members as potential "high potentials."

*Each of my eight "direct reports" has an utterly unique professional trajectory. How could a standardized evaluation form serve any useful purpose? *Standardized evaluation forms are as stupid for assessing the 10 baristas at a Starbucks shop as for assessing Starbucks' 10 senior vice presidents. *Evaluation: No problem with a shared checklist to guide part of the conversation. But the off list" discussion will by far be the most important element. *How do you "identify" "high potentials"? You don't! They identify themselves-that's the whole point. *"High potentials" will take care of themselves. The great productivity "secret" is improving the performance of the 60% in the middle of the distribution.

6.11 ! Me (The [All Important) Development of Self) Being aware of

and how you affect everyone around you is yourself what distinguishes a superior leader. Edie Seashore

The leadership gurus speak with one Selfknowledge and selfdevelopment is Leader Job #1.* voice on this: (*This hasnt been my standard view but there is such unanimous agreement among so many people I respect, that I willingly stand corrected. So be it!)

Think about it. (Your self assessment skills likely [do] STINK . Especially if you think theyre good!) To develop

others, start with yourself. Marshall Goldsmith Mr. Goldsmith is perhaps the best known executive coach around. So: Pay attention. P-L-E-A-S-E.

Work on me first. Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan and Al Switzler/Crucial Conversations Leadership is self-knowledge. Successful leaders are those who are conscious about their behavior and the impact it has on the people around them. They are willing to examine

what behaviors of their own may be getting in the way. The toughest person you will We cant effectively lead others unless we can lead ourselves. ever lead is yourself. Betsy Myers, Take the Lead:

Motivate, Inspire, and Bring Out the Best in Yourself and Everyone Around You How can a high-level leader like _____ be so out of touch with the truth about himself? Its more common than you In fact, the higher up the ladder a leader climbs, the less accurate his selfassessment is likely to be.

would imagine. The problem is an acute lack of feedback [especially on people issues]. Daniel Goleman (et al.), The New Leaders Read. V-E-R-Y carefully. Repeat: Your self-evaluation

S-T-I-N-K-S. (doubtless) The biggest problem I shall ever face: the management of Dale Carnegie. Dale Carnegie, diary of A wonderful observation. From a peerless source.

Which clearly applies to me and thee. "Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself." Leo Tolstoy

Yikes. (Well, maybe we do consider self improvement. But look again at the VERY quotes in this section: Some ( ) savvy people suggest/conclude that self-knowledge and self-development is indeed

Leader Task #1.) 1 -Line Bosses (Cadre of) = Productivity Asset 6.12 st #1!

If the regimental commander lost most of his 2nd lieutenants and 1st lieutenants and captains and majors, it would be a tragedy. If he lost his sergeants it would be a catastrophe. The Army and the Navy are fully aware that success on the battlefield is dependent to an

extraordinary degree on its Sergeants and Chief Petty Officers. Does industry have the same awareness? In great armies, the job of generals is to back up their sergeants. COL Tom Wilhelm, from Robert Kaplan, The Man Who Would Be Khan, The Atlantic

No issue about this. As an astute and universally agreed upon observation and consistent with my U.S. Navy experience with the Seabees in Vietnam (though Chiefs in the USN, not sergeants as in the USA/ USMC/USAF). Employee retention & satisfaction & productivity:

Overwhelmingly based on the first-line manager! Source: Marcus Buckingham & Curt Coffman, First, Break All the Rules: What the Worlds Greatest Managers Do Differently People leave managers not

companies. Dave Wheeler Is there ONE secret to productivity and employee satisfaction? YES! The Quality of your FULL CADRE of 1st-line Leaders.

No way to overstate here. Companies do pay attention to 1st-line supervisorsbut do not/rarely consider the full cadre of 1 -ORDER STRATEGIC ASSET 1st-line leaders a st worthy of stupendous investment in selection

and development. (PLEASE PONDER THIS.) E.g.: Do you have the ... ABSOLUTE BEST 1 -LINE MANAGER TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS IN THE INDUSTRY ... st

So ? do you Suggested addition to your statement of Core We are obsessed with developing a cadre of 1st line

managers that is second to nonewe understand that this cadre per se is arguably one of our top two or three most important Strategic Assets. Values: As I write, Ive been banging on about this for about 18 months. In all my experience, I have rarely hit such an exposed nerveand have rarely observed such vigorous followup (interestingly, especially from giant

company CEOs). Upon reflecting, most agree with the basic assertion of the over-the-top importance of the 1st line cadreand, further, that they are doing a half-assed job at best with selection and development thereof, and that, upon careful examination, theyre downright embarrassed at how inadequate their selection process and training and evaluation and recognition programs are.

6.13 ! WOMEN RULE 56% Keep this figure in mind.

Research suggests that to succeed, start by promoting women. [by McKinsey & Co.] Nicholas Kristof, Twitter, Women, and Power, NYTimes McKinsey is not exactly a bunch of lightweights.

In my experience, women make much better executives than men. Kip Tindell, CEO, Container Store Container Store is wildly successfuland is a mainstay among the Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work For in Americait was in fact recently ranked #1.

AS LEADERS, WOMEN RULE: New Studies find that female managers outshine their male counterparts in almost every measure TITLE/ Special Report/ BusinessWeek

The Economist is not a purveyor of hyperbole. Quite the contrary. Women are rated higher in fully 12 of the 16 competencies that go into outstanding leadership. And two of the traits where women outscored

men to the highest degree taking initiative and driving for results have long been thought of as particularly male strengths. Harvard Business Review/2014 Read carefully. Again, the source is close to unimpeachable. (All the previous quotes in this section

! have 5-star pedigrees ) Lawrence A. Pfaff & Assoc. 2 Years, 941 mgrs (672M, 269F); 360 feedback Women: better in 20 of 20 categories; 15 of 20 with statistical significance, incl. decisiveness,

planning, setting stds.) Men are not rated significantly higher by any of the raters in any of the areas measured. (LP) More. Ditto. For One (BIG) Thing McKinsey & Company found that the international companies with

more women on their corporate boards far outperformed the average company in return on equity and other measures. Operating profit was 56% higher. Source: Nicholas Kristof, Twitter, Women, and Power, NYTimes,

NYTimes, 1024.13 ! 56 / ! McKinsey Womens Strengths Match New

Economy Imperatives: Link [rather than rank] workers; favor interactivecollaborative leadership style [empowerment beats top-down decision making]; sustain fruitful collaborations; comfortable with sharing information; see redistribution of power as victory, not surrender; favor multidimensional feedback; value technical & interpersonal skills, individual & group contributions equally; readily accept ambiguity; honor intuition as well as pure

rationality; inherently flexible; appreciate cultural diversity. Source: Judy B. Rosener, Americas Competitive Secret: Women Managers In the modern organization, huffing and puffing and shouting orders is dying. Gaining cooperation of scattered team members who dont report to the (formally designated) leader is the emergent norm. Whichquite simply and persuasively

plays to womens strengths. Womens Negotiating Strengths *Ability to put themselves in their counterparts shoes *Comprehensive, attentive and detailed communication style *Empathy that facilitates trust-building *Curious and attentive listening *Less competitive attitude *Strong sense of fairness and ability to

persuade *Proactive risk manager *Collaborative decision-making Source: Horacio Falcao, Cover story/May 2006, World Business, Say It Like a Woman: Why the 21st-century negotiator will need the female touch Quite a list, eh? !

(Wow ) TAKE THIS QUICK QUIZ: QUIZ Who manages more things at once? Who puts more effort into their appearance? Who usually takes care of the details? Who finds it easier to meet new people? Who asks more questions in a conversation? Who is a better listener? Who has more interest in communication skills? Who is more inclined to get involved? Who

encourages harmony and agreement? Who has better intuition? Who works with a longer to do list? Who enjoys a recap to the days events? Who is better at keeping in touch with others? Selling Is a Womans Game: 15 Powerful Reasons Why Women Can Outsell Men, Nicki Joy & Susan Kane-Benson Source/from the back cover:

More. Ditto. (I can find no questions which do not deserve an AFFIRMATIVE answer.) In the 1990s, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation/CBC created a short film that recorded an experiment in leadership styles between women and men. CBC didnt tell the participants the objective of the work they would do that day; the director simply divided the male and female leaders into two teams, and gave those team leaders the same instructions: build an adventure camp. The teams were set up in a somewhat militaristic style at first, including team members wearing uniforms, but also with the caveat in place that the teams could alter their style and method as they wished as long as they met the outcome in time.

Leader one immediately created a rank-and-file hierarchy and gave orders, even going so far as to assert authority by challenging members on whether they had polished their shoes. Leader two did not have the troops line up and be inspected, but instead met with the other team members in a circle, asking How are we doing? Are we ready? Anything else we should do? Do you think theyll test us on whether weve polished our shoes? Instead of giving orders, leader two was touching team members on the arm to reassure them. As part of the program, CBC arranged for corporate commentators to watch the teams prepare. Initially the commentators (mostly men) were not impressed by the leadership style of leader two; the second team wasnt under control, members werent lined up, and they lacked order (or so it seemed). The commentators predicted that team two would not successfully complete

the task. Yet when the project was completed, team two had built an impressive adventure camp as good as team ones, with some aspects that were judged as better . When de-briefing their observations, the commentators noticed that when team one was building the structures for the camp, there had been discord regarding who was in charge and who had completed which job and who hadnt. Team one exhibited a lack of communication during the process of completion that created problems (for example, Wasnt someone else supposed to do this?). Team two, on the other hand, took longer to do certain things, but because of its emphasis on communication and collaboration during the enactment of the task (such as Lets tr y this and What do you think about that?), the team met the goal of building the adventure camp in its own positive way, and on time.

Source: Leadership and the Sexes: Using Gender Science to Create Success in Business, by Michael Gurian and Barbara Annis (section title: Gender Experiments Surprise Even the Experts) [Women] see power in terms of influence, not rank. Fortune Guys want to put

everybody in their hierarchical place. Like, should I have more respect for you, or are you somebody thats south of me? Paul Biondi, Mercer Consultants (from Its Not Business, Its Personal, Ronna Lichtenberg) Fascinating, eh? And, again, peculiarly relevant to the

emerging, less orderly and hierarchal organizational formats. (Love love love the CBC study!) Yup. (One more reason women tend to be better managers.) Headline 2020: Women

80 Hold Percent of Management and Professional Jobs Source: The Extreme Future: The Top Trends That Will Reshape the World in the Next 20 Years, James Canton Context for the above.

A new world order. Womens Share of Degrees 2008 57% Advanced 59% Bachelors Source: Martha Barletta/TrendSight Group/0517.11

Helps explain that previous 80% estimate. fast (And this gap is growing [ ].) THE NEW GENDER GAP: From kindergarten to

grad school, boys are becoming the second sex Cover story, BusinessWeek Not Just America BOYS FALLING SEVEN YEARS BEHIND

GIRLS AT GCSE LEVEL headline, Weekly Telegraph, UK Worrisome. VERY ( )

(But this is not the place for an extended discussion on the topic. Just a [troublesome] teaser.) Yields highest return on investment in developing world* Girls education #1:

*better nutrition for family. Better kids education. Better health. Higher family income. Lower birth rate. Etc. Source: Larry Summers, as reported in The Payoff From Womens Rights, Isobel Coleman, Foreign Affairs, May-June 2004 THE BEST IDEA IN THE WORLD: THE SOLUTION TO POVERTY IS

INVESTING IN WOMEN AND GIRLS. MELINDA GATES IS BETTING BILLIONS ON IT. Source: Title, cover story, Forbes, 14 December 2015 FYI. Women Age 22-30 Earn 8% More Than Male Counterparts

Atlanta 21% New York 17% Miami 14% Memphis 19% Etc. Source: Martha Barletta/TrendSight Group/0517.11 Glimpse of tomorrow? The growth and

success of women- owned businesses is one of the most profound changes taking place in the business world today. Margaret Heffernan, How She Does It U.S. firms owned or controlled by Women:

10.6 million (48% of all firms) Growth rate of Women-owned firms vs all firms: 3X Rate of jobs created by Women-owned firms vs all firms: 2X Ratio of total payroll of Women-owned firms vs total for Fortune 500 firms: >1.0 Ratio of likelihood of Women-owned firms staying in business vs all firms: >1.0 Growth rate of Women-owned companies with revenues of >$1,000,000 and >100

employees vs all firms: 2X Source: Margaret Heffernan, How She Does It U.S. Women-owned Biz U.S. employees thereof > F500 employees worldwide Source: Martha Barletta, Marketing to Women

And another angle on the same story. (#s are far beyond impressivethey are singular in their importance.) 94% OF LOANS TO WOMEN* *Microlending; Banker to the poor; Grameen Bank;

Muhammad Yunus; 2006 Nobel Peace Prize winner Another angle on women-owned businesses. Mr. Yunus never intended his micro-lending program to be skewed toward women. But the sad fact is the male recipients tended to squander their loans, often and alas, on the likes of booze and gambling. The women put it into the business and community. Over time the fraction

on the prior slide climbed to the sky. There are countless reasons rescuing girls is the right thing to do. Its also the smart thing to do. Consider the virtuous circle: An extra year of primary school boosts girls eventual wages by 10-20%. An extra year of secondary school adds 15-25%. Girls who stay in school for seven or more years marry four years later and have two fewer children than girls who drop out. Fewer When girls and women earn income, they re-invest 90% in their

families. They buy books, medicine, bed nets. For men the figure is more like 30-40%. Investment in dependents per worker allows for greater economic growth. girls education may well be the highest-return investment available in the developing world, Larry Summers wrote when he was chief economist at the World Bank. The benefits are so obvious, you wonder why we havent paid attention. Less than two cents of every development dollar goes to girlsand that is a victory compared to a few years ago when it was something

like one-half cent. Roughly 9 of 10 youth programs are aimed at boys. Nancy Gibbs, The Best Investment: If you really want to fight poverty , fuel growth and combat extremism, try girl power, TIME (0214.2011) Support for Yunus experience. (Alas, counterevidence is hardif not impossibleto come by.) Reading suggestion (as in I beg you): Half the Sky:

Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn This book is superbthough sometimes harrowing. Warren Buffett Invests Like a Girl:

And Why You Should Too Louann Lofton Portrait of a Female Investor 1. Trade less than men do 2. Exhibit less overconfidencemore likely to know what they dont know 3. Shun risk more than male investors do 4. Less optimistic, more realistic than their male counterparts

5. Put in more time and effort researching possible investmentsconsider details and alternate points of view 6. More immune to peer pressuretend to make decisions the same way regardless of whos watching 7. Learn from their mistakes 8. Have less testosterone than men do, making them less willing to take extreme risks, which, in turn, could lead to less extreme market cycles Warren Buffett Invests Like a Girl: And

Why You Should Too, Louann Lofton, Chapter 2, The Science Behind Source: the Girl Sparkling/Stunning list of attributes. (Could we have avoided the Great Recession if women had run the investment world?) (FYI: Buffett gave the book a great review.)

this will be the womens century I speak to you with a feminine voice. Its the voice of democracy, of equality. I am certain, ladies that this will be the womens century.

and gentlemen, In the Portuguese language, words such as life, soul, and hope are of the feminine gender, as are other words like courage and sincerity. President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil, 1st woman to keynote the United Nations General Assembly I believe it.

Forget CHINA, INDIA and the INTERNET: Economic Growth Is Driven by WOMEN. Source: Headline, Economist W> 2X (C +

I)* *Women now drive the global economy. Globally, they control about $20 trillion in consumer spending, and that figure could climb as high as $28 TRILLION in the next five years. Their $13 trillion in total yearly earnings could reach $18 trillion in the same period. In aggregate, women represent a growth market bigger than China and India

combinedmore than twice as big in fact. Given those numbers, it would be foolish to ignore or underestimate the female consumer. I believe women by and large are the more effective managers than men circa 2016. But that assertion takes on 10X more power when one acknowledges that women are the

primary drivers of economic growth as consumers of goods and services, at retail and, increasingly, as purchasers of the majority of wholesale/commercial goods and services. (This topic is analyzed in detail later in Chapters 11 and 15.) Can you pass the

Squint test ? Take a picture of your executive team. Hold it up in front of your face and squint at it. Does it look pretty much like the market you serve? Odds areand Ill say MUCH MORE laterthat women are a significant perhaps dominantshare of your customer population. So: Does the composition of your exec team

(more or less*) match that market portrait? (*Im not talking about or in any way urging quotas; I am talking about general congruence between market characteristics and leadership team composition; it makes simple economic sense.) Elizabeth Cady Stanton (more or less) (31 March 2007) Ive had a greatand enlightening and

humblingtime working women's issues over the last 20 years. In my spare time as well as professional time. For a local (Vermont) historically themed costume party, I skipped over Ben Franklin and Abe Lincoln and instead dressed as my hero, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, arguably the chief engineer of the 70+ year American effort to gain the right to vote for women. (Which eventually occurred in 1920.)

PUTTING PEOPLE (REALLY!) FIRST: THE LEADERS AGENDA Putting people (REALLY) first calls for a particular type of leadership. It is discussed more fully in Chapter 16. However I have cherrypicked the highlights which I present here.

6.14.1/ MBWA 25 MBWA (Managing By Wandering Around) Im always stopping by our

stores at least 25 a week. Im also in other places: Home Depot, Whole Foods, Crate & Barrel. I try to be a sponge to

pick up as much as I can. Howard Schultz Source: Fortune, Secrets of Greatness When Bob Waterman and I wrote In Search of Excellence in 1982, business was mostly by the numbersand we Americans were struggling (to put it mildly) against hands on, tactile stuff like superior Japanese auto quality. Then, at Hewlett Packard (at the time, Silicon Valleys paragon of Excellence) we were introduced to the famed HP Way, the centerpiece of which

was in-touch management. HP had a term for this MBWA. (MANAGING BY WANDERING AROUND.) Bob and I immediately fell in love. Not only was the idea per se important and effective and cool, but it symbolized everything we were coming to cherish enterprises where bosses-leaders were in immediate touch with and emotionally attached to workers, customers, the product. The idea is arguably more important in 2015 than it was in 1982.

25 Despite the presence of a brilliant staff and terabytes of new data every day, not to mention an insanely busy schedule, Starbucks boss Howard Schultz religiously visits at least 25 shops each week. If he doesnt, he says, he loses touch with the basics of the business and his front line team..

Amen. Amen 25 times over. (And you??) 6.14.2.1/ ! Acknowledgement

! Acknowledgement I like the second title slide better than the first. The deepest principle in human nature is the craving* to be

appreciated. William James *Craving, not wish or desire or longing, per Dale Carnegie, How to Win Friends and Influence People (chapter, The BIG Secret of Dealing With People) The deepest urge in human nature is the desire to be important.

John Dewey P-L-E-A-S-E. Savor both of these quotes. (Repetitive though they are.) Read. Re-read. Re-reread. Do not rush through them.

The sources are impeccable. The idea is priceless. P-R-I-C-E-L-E-S-S. The idea is practical. Acknowledge perhaps the most powerful word (and idea) in the English languageand

in the managers tool kit! Operative term is tool kit. You must measure (yes) yourself on this. Daily. You must LEARN to do this. (It is a field of formal study.) You must practice.

You must de facto become an acknowledgement professional. Employees who don't feel significant rarely make significant contributions. Mark Sanborn Brilliant.

Beyond brilliant. Worthy of deep study. A charter member of my Top 10 Slides set. Leadership is about how you make people feel about you, about the project or work youre doing together, and especially about

themselves. Betsy Myers, Take the Lead: Motivate, Inspire, and Bring Out the Best in Yourself and Everyone Around You Variation on the prior theme. People want to be part of something larger than themselves. They want to be part of something

theyre really proud of, that theyll fight for, sacrifice for, trust. Howard Schultz, Starbucks ! Awesome I watched (as a patient) an ER doc at work. When a nurse or tech came by with something for him to look at, he invariably said

Awesome, in a rather quiet voice. You could call it over the topand it could have been. But fact is somebody brought him something he needed, and he recognized it. For one thing, docs rarely say thanks to anyone. (Sad but true.) And especially their underlings. Second, someone had helped,

so why not recognize that? Acknowledge-appreciatesucceed. (That's all, folks. No kidding.) Boil it down, and all we want is to be acknowledged. Get that, routinely offer such acknowledgementand you couldn't fail if you tried. A CANDIDATE FOR THE

CORE VALUES STATEMENT: We habitually express appreciation for one anothers effortsbecause we do in fact consciously appreciate everyones ordinary daily contributions, let alone the extraordinary ones.

Yes. Formalize. CORE VALUE. In Greece, a long time ago, an old couple opened their door to two strangers who were,

it soon appeared, not men at all, but gods. It is my favorite story how the old couple had almost nothing to give but their willingness to be attentive and for this alone the gods loved them and blessed them.

Source: Mary Oliver, White Pine (from the poem Mockingbird) 6.14.2.2/ 2 THAN K YOU Nothing but nothing but nothing is more important than saying Thank you.

PERIOD. Little >> Big THIS TALE OF SMALL IS VERY VERY

BIG. Its not Thank you for making the milliondollar sales that matters. (Thats going to happen regardless.) Its, to use One-Minute Manager/Ken Blanchards term, catching someone doing something [some little thing] right. And to the recipient, the spontaneous little ones have higher impact than the biggies. (Please re-read:

SMALL >> Big.) 1/80* *Post-interview Thank you notes A women came up to me after my riff on acknowledgement. shed just landed a big job competing against about 80 others. The person who made her the offer told her that of the 80 candidates, she was the

ONLY ONE who followed up the interview with thank you notes to each of the interviewers. (Doubtless she had the technical specs to fit the job, as did most or all of the others. But a distinguishing factor, beyond the bare requirements, doubtless were those T-notes!)

Retired United States Navy Captain Mike Abrashoff knows the importance of saying THANK YOU. In Its Your Ship, Abrashoff relates how he sent letters to the parents of his crew members on the guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold, many of whom came from

underprivileged backgrounds. Putting himself in those parents shoes, he imagined how happy they would be to hear from the Commanding Officer that their sons and daughters were doing well. And he figured that those parents would, in turn, call their children to tell them how proud they were of them. Abrashoff debated whether to send a letter to the parents of one young man who wasnt really star material. Weighing the sailors progress, he decided to go ahead. A couple of weeks later, the sailor appeared at his door, tears streaming down his face. It seems that the kids father had always considered him a failure and told him so. After reading the captains letter, he called to congratulate his son and tell him

how proud he was of him. Captain, I cant thank you enough, said the young man. For the first time in his life, he felt loved and encouraged by his father. As Abrashoff says, Leadership is the art of practicing simple things commonsense gestures that ensure high morale and vastly increase the odds of winning. In other words, small changes can have big consequences . Source : Rick Faulk and Barry Libert, BARACK, INC. What Business Can Learn from the Obama Campaign More. CEO Doug Conant

30,000 handwritten sent Thank you notes to employees during the 10 years he ran Campbell Soup. [approx 10/day]

Source: Bloomberg BusinessWeek ! NO! YOU CANNOT OVERDO IT! IM SO SICK AND TIRED OF THIS DEBATE OVER DE-VALUING THE THANK YOU

CURRENCY. Bullshit. Say Thank you until youre blue in the face. Then say it some more. It is the key to every flavor of relationship

and, by extension, leader effectiveness. 6.14.3/ 4/8/12 The 4 most important

words in any organization are THE FOUR MOST IMPORTANT WORDS IN ANY ORGANIZATION WHAT DO YOU THINK? ARE

Source: courtesy Dave Wheeler, posted at tompeters.com For what its worth, I agree wholeheartedly with Mr. Wheelers assertion: FOUR-MOST-IMPORTANT. WDYT = Certification of me (the one asked) as a person

of Importance whose opinion is valued. WDYT Not only is a peerless source of informationbut it is also a peerlessly peerless motivator.

Tomorrow: How many times will you ask the WDYT question ? (Count em!!) (Practice makes better!) (This is a STRATEGIC skill!) As usual, my measurement bias.

8: Change the World With EIGHT Words What do you think? How can I help? Are you a full-fledged professional when it comes to helping?

MUCH Helping: ( ) easier said than done! A formal skill to be studied and practiced. (Frankly, I think effectiveness at helping makes neurosurgery look like a walk in the park. Itdone rightis an act of

EXTREME DELICACY.) What do managers do for a living? Help! Right? How many of us could call ourselves professional helpers, meaning that we have studiedlike a professional mastering her musical crafthelping? (Not many, Id judge.)

Ed Schein: Helping: How to Offer, Give, and Receive Help Last chapter: 7 principles. E.g.: PRINCIPLE 2: Effective Help Occurs When the Helping Relationship Is Perceived to Be Equitable. PRINCIPLE 4: Everything You Say or Do Is an Intervention that Determines the Future of the Relationship. PRINCIPLE 5: Effective Helping Begins with Pure Inquiry. PRINCIPLE 6: It Is the Client Who Owns the Problem.*

(Words matter!! Read a quote from NFL player-turned lawyer-turned professional football coach, calling his players my clients. (*Love the idea that the employee is a Client ! Employee as Client! Helping is what we (leaders) do for a living! STUDY/PRACTICE helping as you would neurosurgery! (Helping is your neurosurgery!) )

Scheins book is simply a must read. read. A must study. A must practice. A must Boss as CHRO/Chief

Hurdle Removal Officer Removing impediments to GTD/Getting Things Done is a major part of the boss FORMAL role. 12: Change the World

With TWELVE Words What do you think? How can I help? What have you learned? You (leader) should be able to get immediate answer upon stopping anyone and What have

you learned today? asking, 2016/2016+: Learn something every day literallyor quickly fall behind in the employability race (individual without perpetually enhanced skills) and effectiveness race (organization without 100% learners).

Yes: EVERY EMPLOYEE. EVERY DAY. EVERY = EVERY. 4/8/12 What do you think? How can I help?

What have you learned? Your mantra! 6.14.4/ 18 The doctor interrupts

after * *Source: Jerome Groopman, How Doctors Think Harvard Med School doc Jerome Groopman tells us that the patient is the doctors best source of evidence about the patients problem. Period. Then, citing hard-nosed research, Groopman asks, On average, how long does the patient

speak before the doc interrupts 18 18 seconds! The topic here is leaders, not M.D.s But I will bet you a fat sum that the majority of leaders fall within the docs 18-second

timeframe. (An obsession with) Listening is ... the ultimate mark of Respect Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ...

Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... the heart and soul of Engagement. the heart and soul of Kindness. the heart and soul of Thoughtfulness. the basis for true Collaboration. the basis for true Partnership. a Team Sport. a Developable Individual Skill.* (*Though women

Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... the basis for Community. the bedrock of Joint Ventures that work. the bedrock of Joint Ventures that grow. the core of effective Cross-functional Communication.* (*Which is in turn Attribute #1 of

are far better at it than men.) organization effectiveness.) . LISTENING the ULTIMATE mark of RESPECT.

Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ...

Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... Listening is ... the engine of superior EXECUTION. the key to making the Sale. the key to Keeping the Customers Business.

Service. the engine of Network development. the engine of Network maintenance. the engine of Network expansion. Social Networkings secret weapon. Learning. the sine qua non of Renewal. the sine qua non of Creativity. the sine qua non of Innovation. the core of taking diverse opinions aboard. Strategy.

Source #1 of Value-added. Differentiator #1. Profitable.* (*The R.O.I. from listening is higher than from any other single activity.) Listening is the bedrock which underpins a Commitment to EXCELLENCE SUSTAINABLE COMPARATIVE STRATEGIC ADVANTAGE there is nothing but

When it comes to nothing but nothing that compares with EXCELLENCE IN STRATEGIC LISTENING. Period. (Think about it LONG & HARD.) I DECIDED THAT MY JOB WAS TO

LISTEN AGGRESSIVELY AGGRESSIVE LISTENING: My education in leadership began in Washington when I was an assistant to Defense Secretary William Perry. He was universally loved and admired by heads of state and our own and allied troops. A lot of that was because of the way he listened. Each person who talked to him had his complete, undivided attention. Everyone blossomed in his presence,

because he was so respectful, and I realized I wanted to affect people the same way. Perry became my role model but that was not enough. Something bigger had to happen, and it did. It was painful to realize how often I just pretended to hear people. How many times had I barely glanced up from my work when a subordinate came into my office? I wasnt paying attention; I was marking time until it was my turn to give orders. That revelation led me to a new personal goal. I vowed to

treat every encounter with every person on Benfold (Abrashoff was the Captain) as the most important thing at that moment. It wasnt easy, but my crews enthusiasm and ideas kept me going. It didnt take me long to realize that my young crew was smart, talented and full of good ideas that usually came to nothing because no one in charge had I DECIDED THAT MY JOB WAS TO LISTEN AGGRESSIVELY Mike Abrashoff, Its Your Ship: ever listened to them.

Management Techniques from the Best Damn Ship in the Navy Mike Abrashoff is one the most pursued management gurus. His approach to effectively commanding a U.S. Navy guided missile destroyer is admired far and wide. Among the primary tactics he used was aggressive listening

not exactly the norm for ship captains, or, for that matter, the average manager. Tweets on Listening/@tom_peters Hustle essential. But remember to routinely take-make the time to engage people at a personal level about professional issuesopportunities. People are on to you! They are able in a flash to discern that even though you asked a question you are not tuned in to their response. If you ask a question and don't ask 2 or 3 follow up questions,

odds are you weren't listening to the answer. If you are "listening" and in your mind preparing your response, then, duh, you aren't listening! I grew up near railroad crossings. As kids we had drummed into us, "Stop. Look. Listen." Bosses should religiously heed this advice!

You must introduce a core training course in listening. Label it "Fundamentals of execution." Execution hinges on listening Its not a solo act. Listening is a purposeful act requiring effort and 100% attention. Theres nothing casual or automatic about it. Listening is expensive. It's just that the alternative is far more WHY NOT?

6.14.5/ Why in the World did you go to Siberia? A half-dozen years ago I went to Novosibirsk, Siberia, to give a seminar. (Novosibirsk, center of Soviet scientific excellence, was now confronting the global

economyand looking for a new direction.) The unusual setting caused me to go back to first principals in my thinking about enterprise. I asked myself, for starters WHATS THE POINT? An emotional, vital, innovative, joyful, creative, entrepreneurial endeavor that elicits maximum

ENTERPRISE* (*AT ITS BEST): concerted human potential in the wholehearted pursuit of EXCELLENCE in service of others.** others **Employees, Customers, Suppliers, Communities, Owners, Temporary partners An

emotional, vital, innovative, joyful, creative, entrepreneurial endeavor that elicits maximum concerted human potential in the wholehearted pursuit of EXCELLENCE in service of ENTERPRISE*

(*AT ITS BEST) : Enterprise, as I note AT ITS BEST. (Obviously not always achievedor, alas, even aspired to.) On the other hand if this or something very much like it is not the aim,

then what is the point? Think about it. Please. (E.g., Consider the opposite of each word hereis, say, joyless acceptable?) (Photo is me and my interpreter, who turned out to have an economics PhD from the University of Maryland; on stage in Novosibirsk.) It may sound radical, unconventional, and bordering on being a crazy business idea. However as ridiculous as it soundsjoy is

the core belief of our workplace. Joy is the reason my company, Menlo Innovations, a customer software design and development firm in Ann Arbor, exists. It defines what we do and how we do it. It is the single shared belief of our entire team.

Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love Richard Sheridan, The industry is tough as nails, fast-pacedand unforgiving. And yet Menlo CEO Richard Sheridan insists that his raison d'tre, competitive advantage and success secret is JOY!

Again, please think about this. Carefully. What would be the literal translation in your world? And: WHY NOT? (Seriously.) (Damn it.)

You have to treat your employees like customers. Herb Kelleher, Southwest Airlines, upon being asked his secret to success If you want staff to give great service, give great service to staff. Ari Weinzweig, Zingermans, in Bo Burlinghams Small Giants: Companies That Choose to Be Great Instead of Big

Obvious. Honored in the breach in 9 of 10 cases. What employees experience, Customers will. The best marketing YOUR CUSTOMERS WILL NEVER BE ANY HAPPIER THAN YOUR EMPLOYEES. is happy, engaged employees.

John DiJulius, The Customer Service Revolution: Overthrow Conventional Business, Inspire Employees, and Change the World By my lights PROFOUND. OBVIOUS. M.I.A. Profit Through Putting People First Business Book Club

Nice Companies Finish First: Why Cutthroat Management Is Overand Collaboration Is In, by Peter Shankman with Karen Kelly Uncontainable: How Passion, Commitment, and Conscious Capitalism Built a Business Where Everyone Thrives, by Kip Tindell, CEO Container Store Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business, by John Mackey, CEO Whole Foods, and Raj Sisodia Firms of Endearment: How World-Class Companies Profit from Passion and Purpose, by Raj Sisodia, Jag Sheth, and David Wolfe The Good Jobs Strategy: How the Smartest Companies Invest in Employees to Lower Costs and Boost Profits, by Zeynep Ton, MIT

Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love, by Richard Sheridan, CEO Menlo Innovations Employees First, Customers Second: Turning Conventional Management Upside Down, by Vineet Nayar, CEO, HCL Technologies Patients Come Second: Leading Change By Changing the Way You Lead by Paul Spiegelman & Britt Berrett The Customer Comes Second: Put Your People First and Watch Em Kick Butt, by Hal Rosenbluth, former CEO, Rosenbluth International Its Your Ship: Management Techniques from the Best Damn Ship in the Navy, by Mike Abrashoff, former commander, USS Benfold

Turn This Ship Around; How to Create Leadership at Every Level, by L. David Marquet, former commander, SSN Santa Fe Small Small Giants: Companies That Choose to Be Great Instead of Big, by Bo Burlingham Hidden Champions: Success Strategies of Unknown World Market Leaders, Leaders, by Hermann Simon Retail Superstars: Inside the 25 Best Independent Stores in America, America, by George Whalin Joy at Work: A Revolutionary Approach to Fun on the Job, by Dennis Bakke, former CEO,

AES Corporation The Dream Manager, by Matthew Kelly The Soft Edge: Where Great Companies Find Lasting Success, by Rich Karlgaard, publisher, Forbes Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Profits, by Tony Hsieh, Zappos Camellia: A Very Different Company Fans, Not Customers: How to Create Growth Companies in a No Growth World, World, by Vernon Hill Like a Virgin: Secrets They Wont Teach You at Business School, School, by Richard Branson

There are folks who practice this stuff. And there is a de facto library associated therewith. And I do suggest a leadership/ executive book club. Namely: Profit Through Putting People First Business Book Club. PEOPLE > STRATEGY

6.15 (Finally) McKinsey: Culture > Strategy What matters most to a company over time? Strategy or culture?

Wall Street Journal, 0910.13: Dominic Barton, Managing Director, McKinsey & Co.: McKinsey: Culture. People > Strategy

People Before Strategy title, lead article, Harvard Business Review July-August 2015, by McKinsey MD Dominic Barton et al. This was not the McKinsey I grew up in where culture was soft stuff, worthy of disdain, not worship. And the people stuff merited little more than lip service. Perhaps some progress after all?

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