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Grade 66 Teacher Directions Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Reading 12 Selected Response Items 1 Constructed Response Research 3 Constructed Response Writing 1 Full Composition (Performance Task) 1 Brief Write 1 Write to Revise Writing w/ Integrated Language 1 Language/Vocabulary 1 Edit/Clarify Order at HSD Print Shop http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/Departments/PrintShop/ Order at HSD Print Shop WebSubmissionForms.aspx http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/Departments/PrintShop/ WebSubmissionForms.aspx Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 66 QuarterThree Three Quarter PrePreAssessment Assessment Reading: Literature Targets Standards DOK 3 Word Meanings RL.6.4 1-2 6 Text Structures/Features RL. 6.7 2 5 Analysis Within and Across Texts RL. 6.9 4 Reading: Informational Targets Standards DOK 10 Word Meanings

RI. 6.4 1-2 11 Reasoning and Evidence RI. 6.8 3 12 Analysis Within and Across Texts RI. 6.9 4 Note: There may be more standards per target. Writing standards assessed in this assessment are boxed. Narrative Writing and Language Targets Standards DOK 1a Brief Narrative Write W.3a, W.3b, W.3c, W.3d 3 1b Write-Revise Informational W.3a, W.3b, W.3c, W.3d 2 2 Full Narrative Composition W-3a, W-3b, W-3c, W-3d, W-4, W-5, W-8, W-9 4 8 Language-Vocabulary Use L.3a L.6 1-2 9 Edit and Clarify L.6.1b 1-2 Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond All elementary ELA assessments were reviewed and revised in June of 2015 by the following amazing and dedicated HSD K-6th

grade teachers. Deborah Alvarado Lincoln Street Ko Kagawa Minter Bridge Linda Benson West Union Jamie Lentz Mooberry Anne Berg Eastwood Sandra Maines Quatama Aliceson Brandt Eastwood Gina McLain TOSA Sharon Carlson Minter Bridge Teresa Portinga Patterson Deborah Deplanche Patterson Judy Ramer Consultant Alicia Glasscock Imlay Sara Retzlaff McKinney Sonja Grabel Patterson Jami Rider Free Orchards Megan Harding Orenco Kelly Rooke Free Orchards Renae Iversen TOSA Angela Walsh Witch Hazel Ginger Jay Witch Hazel Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Performance Task: Optional This is a pre-assessment to measure the task of writing an informational article. Full compositions are always part of a Performance Task. A complete performance task would have: Part 1 A. Classroom Activity (30 Minutes) Your classroom activity (group activity) should consist of introducing to students vocabulary words or language that

may be unfamiliar to them within a different context than the actual assessment passages. (35 minutes) B. Passages or stimuli to Read C. 3 Research Questions D. There may be other constructed response questions. Part 2 A Full-Composition (70 Minutes) Students should have access to spell check resources but no grammar check resources. Students can refer back to their passages, notes and 3 research questions and any other constructed responses, as often theyd like. Directions 30 minutes 1. You may wish to have a 30 minute classroom activity. The purpose of a PT activity is to ensure that all students are familiar with the concepts of the topic and know and understand key terms (vocabulary) that are at the upper end of their grade level (words they would not normally know or are unfamiliar to their background or culture). The classroom activity DOES NOT pre-teach any of the content that will be assessed. 35 minutes 2. Students read the passages independently. If you have students who can not read the passages you may read them to those students but please make note of the accommodation. Remind students to take notes as they read. During an actual SBAC assessment students are allowed to keep their notes as a reference. 3. Students answer the 3 research questions or other constructed response questions. Students should also refer to their answers when writing their full opinion piece. 15 minute break 70 Minutes 4. Students write their full composition (informational piece). SCORING An Informational Rubric is provided. Students receive three scores: 4. Organization and Purpose 5. Evidence and Elaboration 6. Conventions Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond What Makes a Hero This classroom pre-activity follows the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium general design of contextual elements, resources, learning goals, key terms and purpose [http://oaksportal.org/resources/] The content within each of these was written by Anne Berg, Aliceson Brandt and Ko Kagawa. The Classroom Activity introduces students to the context of a performance task, so they are not disadvantaged in demonstrating the skills the task intends to assess. Contextual elements include: 1. an understanding of the setting or situation in which the task is placed 2. potentially unfamiliar concepts that are associated with the scenario 3. key terms or vocabulary students will need to understand in order to meaningfully engage with and complete the performance task The Classroom Activity is also intended to generate student interest in further exploration of the key idea(s). The Classroom Activity should be easy to implement with clear instructions. Please read through the entire Classroom Activity before beginning the activity with students to ensure any classroom preparation can be completed in advance. Throughout the activity, it is permissible to pause and ask students if they have any questions. Resources needed: Chart paper, whiteboard, or chalkboard Markers or chalk One piece of paper and a pencil for each group Learning Goals: Students will understand the context of the key concepts related to the topic: o what qualities and accomplishments that make a hero. Students will understand the key terms: Note: Definitions are provided here for the convenience of facilitators. Students are expected to understand these key terms in the context of the task, not memorize the definitions . Hero: a person who is admired for their courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities Qualities: a feature belonging to someone that identifies them Accomplishment: something that someone has done successfully Purpose: The facilitators goal is to introduce students to the idea that heroes have certain qualities and accomplishments. This activity will allow students to be active participants as they explore different types heroes.] Note: The following section can be modified to accommodate various teacher-student interaction types such as a teacher-lead discussion with the entire class, a teacher-student discussion for remote locations with a single student, or small groups. [Divide the students in small groups of two to four students. Give each group a piece of a paper and a pencil.] *Facilitators can decide whether they want to display ancillary materials using an overhead projector or computer/Smartboard, or

whether they want to produce them as a handout for students. Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond What Makes a Hero continued Facilitator says: People become heroes either through their qualities or accomplishments. [Write and read aloud: What qualities and accomplishments make someone a hero?] One nonfictional person that people consider a hero is Harriet Tubman. Harriet was born a slave in 1819, where she worked hard in the fields and was severely mistreated. She fled slavery in 1849, leaving family and friends behind. Harriet was passionate about freeing slaves and made many dangerous trips on the Underground Railroad to help free slaves. She made this trip at least 19 times, bringing hundreds of slaves to freedom. In her trips she never lost a slave or allowed one to turn back. Another hero is Malala Yousafzai, who was born in 1997 in Pakistan. She believes that every child, no matter their gender, has a right to an education. As a result of her advocacy for education, the Taliban, an Islamic militant group, threatened and attempted to kill her. Malala was shot and seriously injured, but survived the attack and continues to speak out on the importance of education. In 2014 she became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. Cesar Chavez was born in 1927 near Yuma, Arizona. As a migrant farmworker, he saw first hand the mistreatment of workers, as there were long hours, little pay, few bathrooms, and poor drinking water. He dedicated his life to improving the treatment, pay and working conditions for farmworkers and making sure they were treated fairly. Now that you know about these heroes, work with your small group to answer the following question on the paper provided. [Read and write the following question: What qualities and accomplishments do each of these heroes have that make them stand out?] [Give the students three minutes to discuss and write down their thoughts. After about three minutes, have students share their ideas with the class. Ask the students to share their response to the question and record them under the initial question.] Possible class discussion answers (unscripted): Harriet Tubman Courageous: She had courage when she escaped slavery and helped people do the same. Selflessness: She was selfless because she put others needs before her own. Malala Yousafzai Passionate: She is passionate about making sure that girls have access to education. Bravery: She is brave. Even after nearly dying for her cause, she continues to fight for what she believes in. Cesar Chavez Passionate: He was passionate about making sure that farmworkers had equal rights. Peaceful: He believed in practicing nonviolence in order to bring about change. Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond What Makes a Hero continued [When the discussion is finished, create the chart below.] Quality Accomplishment Hero Accomplishment Quality Facilitator says: Think of someone famous or someone you know that you consider to be a hero. Keep in mind that you should be able to explain multiple qualities and accomplishments to support why this person is a hero. Include those qualities and accomplishments in the web. [Give the students five minutes to discuss and write down their thoughts.] Possible student responses (unscripted) Insert name of person: students list qualities like: patient, loving, selfless, caring, kind, supportive, etc. Facilitator says: Turn to a person in your small group and share out who your hero is and what qualities and accomplishments they have. [Give the students three minutes to discuss their hero with a partner.] [After about three minutes, have students share their ideas with the class. Ask the students to share their responses. This discussion should last about five minutes.] Possible student responses (unscripted) See above Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond What Makes a Hero continued Facilitator says: If you look at all of the heroes that we have discussed as a class, you will notice

that many of them share similar qualities. These qualities enable them to accomplish great things that benefit our world. Facilitator says: In your performance task, you will be learning more about heroes. The group work you did today should help prepare you for the research and writing you will be doing in the performance task. Note: Facilitator should collect student notes from this activity. Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Directions The HSD Elementary assessments are neither scripted nor timed assessments. They are a tool to inform instructional decision making. All students should move toward taking the assessments independently but many will need scaffolding strategies. If students are not reading at grade level and cant read the text, please read the stories to the students and ask the questions. Allow students to read the parts of the text that they can. Please note the level of differentiation a student needed. About this Assessment This assessment includes: Selected Response, Constructed Response, and a Performance Task. Types of SBAC Constructed Response Rubrics in this Assessment http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=774846 Reading 2 Point Short Response 2-3 Point Extended Response Writing 4 Point Full Composition Rubric (Performance Task) 2-3 Point Brief Write (1-2 Paragraphs) Rubric 2-3 Point Write to Revise Rubrics as Needed Research 2 Point Rubrics Measuring Research Skill /Use Quarter 3 Performance Task The underlined sections are those scored on SBAC. Please take 2 days to complete performance tasks. Part 1 Part 2 Classroom Activity if Desired/Needed Read two paired passages. Take notes while reading (note-taking). Answer SR and CR research questions about sources Components of Part 1 Note-Taking: Students take notes as they read passages to gather information about their sources. Students are allowed to use their notes to later write a full composition (essay). Note-taking strategies should be taught as structured lessons throughout the school year in grades K 6. A teachers note-taking form with directions and a notetaking form for your students to use for this assessment is provided, or you may use whatever formats youve had past success with. Please have students practice using the note-taking page in this document before the actual assessment if you choose to use it. Research: In Part 1 of a performance task students answer constructed response questions written to measure a students ability to use research skills needed to complete a performance task. These CR questions are scored using the SBAC Research Rubrics rather than reading response rubrics.

Class Activity Plan your essay (brainstorming /pre-writing). Write, revise and edit (W.5) Writing a narrative or story Components of Part 2 Planning Students review notes and sources and plan their composition. Write, Revise and Edit Students draft, write, revise and edit their writing. Word processing tools should be available for spell check (but no grammar check). This protocol focuses on the key elements of writing narratives: 1. introduction (narrator and/or setting and characters) 2. organization (event sequence) 3. development (narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, description reflection, and multiple plot lines) 4. transitions (to sequence events) 5. conclusion 6. conventions of Standard English. There are NO Technology-enhanced Items/Tasks (TE) Note: It is highly recommended that students have experiences with the following types of tasks from various on-line instructional practice sites, as they are not on the HSD Elementary Assessments: reordering text, selecting and changing text, selecting text, and selecting from drop-down menu Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Pre-Assessments and Learning Progressions The pre-assessments are unique and measure progress toward a standard. Unlike the Common Formative Assessments which measure standard mastery, the pre-assessments are more like a baseline picture of a students strengths and gaps, measuring skills and concepts students need along the way, in order to achieve standard mastery. Beg. of QTR CFA Example of a Learning Progression for RL.2.1 Pre-Assessments Measure Adjustment Points (in purple) After the pre-assessment is given, Learning Progressions provide informal formative assessment below and near grade-level tasks throughout each quarter. DOK 1 - Ka Recall who, what, where, when, why and how about a story read and discussed in class. DOK - Kc Use and define Standard Academic Language: who, what, where, when, why, and how; ask, answer, questions, key details

DOK 1 - Cd Connect the terms who to characters; where and when to setting; what and how to sequence of events. DOK 1 - Cf Ask and answer who, what, where, when, why and how questions about key details in a text. DOK 2 - Ch Concept Development Student understands that key details help tell who, what, where, when, why and how. DOK 2 - Ck Uses key details to identify who, what, where, when, why and how about a story not read in class. RL.6.1 grade-level standard assessment. Throughout the QTR DOK 2 -Cl Finds information using key details to answer specific questions about a new story. END of QTR Standard Mastery RL.2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text So what about a post assessment? There is not a standardized post-assessment. The true measure of how students are doing along the way, is assessed in the classroom during instruction and classroom formative assessment. For this reason The CFAs are not called post assessments. The CFAs measure the end goal, or standard mastery. However, without the pre-assessments, how will we know what our instruction should focus on throughout each quarter? Learning Progressions: are the predicted set of skills needed to be able to complete the required task demand of each standard. The learning progressions were aligned to Hess Cognitive Rigor Matrix. The pre-assessments measure student proficiency indicated on the boxes in purple (adjustment points).

These points are tasks that allow us to adjust instruction based on performance. For instance, if a student has difficulty on the first purple adjustment point (DOK 1 Cf) the teacher will need to go back to the tasks prior to DOK-1 Cf and scaffold instruction to close the gap, continually moving forward to the end of the learning progression. There is a Reading Learning Progression checklist for each standard in each grade that can be used to monitor progress. The checklists are available at: http://sresource.homestead.com/Grade-6.html Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Quarter Three Reading Literature Learning Progressions. The indicated boxes highlighted before the standard, are assessed on this pre-assessment. The standard itself is assessed on the Common Formative Assessment (CFA) at the end of each quarter. DOK 1 - Ka Recall the definitions of specific figurative, connotative and technical meaning words and phrases as discussed in class. DOK 1 - Kc Understands and uses Academic Standard Language: figurative, connotative, technical analyze, impact, meaning and tone. DOK 1 - Ce Select appropriate figurative, connotative or technical words or phrases when the intended meaning is clearly evident. DOK 1 - APg L.6.5c L.6.4b Use Distinguish common, among the gradeconnotations appropriate Greek or Latin (associations) of words with affixes and similar roots as clues to the meaning definitions. of a word. DOK 2 -Ch DOK 2 - APn Concept Use context to Development: determine the Student meaning (L.6.4a)

understands of figurative, that the technical or choices of connotative words used meaning of affect the words and meaning and phrases. L.6.5a tone of a text. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context. DOK 1 - Kc Retells specific differences between reading and hearing a story. Retells specific differences between reading or hearing and viewing a story. Define (understand meaning of..) Academic Standard Language terms: viewing, audio, video, and live version. Use the word perceive accurately in speaking about an experience. DOK 1 Ka Locates historical novels, poems, and stories of different genre. DOK 1 Cd Understan Identifies ds and different uses literary Academic elements Vocabulary: within genre, different historical genres. novels, approache s, theme, compare, contrast, fantasy, and topics. D

DOK 1 - Kc T NO SE AS E SS DOK 1 - Cd Identifies literary elements as presented in reading, hearing or viewing a story, drama or poem. DOK - 2Ch Concept Development Understands that different genres approach topics differently. DOK 3 - ANA Analyze the impact of figurative word or phrases on meaning and tone. SELECTED RESPONSE #2 SELECTED RESPONSE #1 NOT ASSESSED DOK 1 - Ka DOK 3 Cw Describe how word choices affect the readers interpretation of a text. Standard RI6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone

DOK 3 - EVS Standard Students can Concept Compare (or Connect Analyze Synthesize the RL.6.7 Compare explain what Development organize) and specific perceptual experiences of and contrast the they see Students use specific characteristi changes made reading, experience of and what they recognize that examples how cs of text, in a read listening or reading a story, hear when stories reading a text audio, visual version viewing the drama, or poem to reading a text. (dramas is different or live compared to same version of listening to or Do they see and/or poems) from an audio versions of a an audio or a text in order viewing an audio, and hear the are presented version. story to live version of to make a video, or live same thing differently in (Continue with examples the same recommendatio version of the text, when listening read texts, reading vs live seen or story. How n of the benefits including or watching a audio and live audio vs live, heard. did it change of each. contrasting what story, drama or viewed etc...). their they see and or poem? versions. SELECTED perceptions of CONSTRUCTED hear when RESPONSE the story? RESPONSE #7 reading the text to SELECTED #4 what they perceive RESPONSE #3 when they listen or watch. DOK 1 - Cf DOK 2 - Ch DOK 2 - ANp

DOK 2 ANp Makes Applies Compares generalizatio understanding similarities n about how of how in genre different different approache genre genre s to approach approach themes themes and themes and and topic topics. topics in a (not next context. contrasting). DOK 2 - Ck DOK 2 - APn SELECTED RESPONSE #5 DOK 3 - Cu DOK 2 ANr Analyzes (compares &contrasts ) how different text structures in different genres contribute to their DOK 3 - ANA DOK 3 Cu Connects specific ideas of how two or more genre are the same or different using examples from the text. DOK 4 - SYH DOK 3 - SYH DOK 4 - SYU Standard Synthesizes within one text (at a time) of each studied genre (i.e., a

graphic showing approaches to themes and topics). Synthesizes information across multiple sources or texts for the purpose of comparing approaches to similar themes or topics. RL.6.9 Compare and contrast text in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE #8 approaches in similar themes and topics. SELECTED RESPONSE #6 Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Quarter Three Reading Informational Learning Progressions. The indicated boxes highlighted before the standard, are assessed on this pre-assessment. The standard itself is assessed on the Common Formative Assessment (CFA) at the end of each quarter. DOK 1 - Ka Recall the definitions of specific figurative, connotative and technical meaning words and phrases as discussed in class. DOK 1 - Kc Understands and uses Academic Standard Language: figurative, connotative and technical meanings. DOK 1 - Ce Select appropriate figurative, connotative or technical words or phrases when the intended meaning is clearly evident. DOK 1 - APg L.6.4b Use common, L.6.5c Distinguish among the connotations

grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes (associations) of words and roots as clues to with similar definitions. the meaning of a word. SELECTED RESPONSE #9 DOK 1 - Kc Define (understanding the meaning of...) trace, evaluate, argument, claims, specific, distinguish, evidence, reasons and support. DOK 1 - Ka DOK 1 - Kc Recall events written about the same person in two different texts (memoir or biography). Define (understand the meaning of) presentation, compare/ contrast and the difference between a memoir and a biography. DOK 1 - Cf Answer questions about specific claims or arguments from a text read in class. DOK 2 - Ch Concept Development: Understands that claims support an argument and evidence supports the claim DOK 2 Ci Explain Summari who, what, Explain the ze the where, differences key when or

between a events in how about memoir a a persons and a persons memoir or biography. memoir biography. and a DOK 1 - Cf DOK 2 - Ch Standard RI6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings. SELECTED RESPONSE #10 NOT ASSSESSED DOK 1 - Ka Locate or recall details about specific claims in a text, discussed or read about in class. DOK 2 - APn Use context to determine the meaning (L.6.4a) of figurative, technical or connotative meaning of words and phrases. L.6.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context. DOK 2- Ck Concludes if there is sufficient claim to support an argument. SELECTED RESPONSE #11 DOK 2- Cl Locates specific claims that support an argument DOK 2- ANs Distinguish between evidence that supports or not, specific claims in a text in a classread text. SELECTED RESPONSE #12 Explain if a persons memoir presents events the

same as a biography written about the same person. SELECTED RESPONSE #13 T NO DOK 3- APx Explain how a claim supports a specific argument using reasons and evidence DOK 4 APM Analyze why Draw Give a persons conclusions examples memoir may about about or may not similarities memoirs and present and biographies events in differences that are the same in a memoir biographies associated that can way as a written by a with other biography person and be applied domains or to other written a biography themes content about the written contribution domains s to same about the or person. same historical, concepts. geographical person. Make an or social. evaluation about the two different texts. DOK 2 - Cl DOK 2 - ANp DOK 3 -ANy DOK 3 - EVF Locate

answers about specific events in a persons memoir or a biography biography written about the about same the same person. person. DOK 3- Cu Connect arguments from a new text to specific claims and the evidence to support those claims. DOK 4 CK Develop generaliza tions about memoirs and ED SS SE S AS ED SS SE S S TA NO Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Standard RI6.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not. DOK 4-ANP Standard Gather, analyze and organize multiple information sources from

memoirs and biographies of two or more person. RI.6.7Compa re and contrast one authors presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person). SELECTED RESPONSE #14 Grades 3 - 8: Generic 4-Point Narrative Writing Rubric Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization Score Statement of Purpose/Focus CCSS and Report Card Alignment Text Types & Purposes: 3rd-W.3.3a-b 4th-W.4.3a-b 5th-W.5.3a-b 6th-W.6.3a, b, d The narrative, real or imagined, is clearly focused and maintained throughout: effectively establishes a setting, narrator and/or characters, and point of Exemplary view* (E) Development: Language and Elaboration of Evidence Organization CCSS and Report Card Alignment Text Types & Purposes: 3rd-W.3.3c-d 4th-W.4.3c-d 5th-W.5.3c-d 6th-W.6.3c, e Elaboration of Evidence Language and Vocabulary CCSS and Report Card Alignment Research to Build and Present Knowledge: 3rd-W.3.7-8 4th-W.4.7-9 5th-W.5.7-9 6th-W.6.3d & W.6.7-9 CCSS and Report Card Alignment

Conventions & Vocab. Acquisition: 3rd-L.3.1b-i, L.3.3a & L.3.6 4th-L.4.1, L.4.3a, & L.4.6 5th-L.5.1b-e, L.5.3a & L.5.6 6th-L.6.1, L.6.3 & L.6.6.1 Conventions CCSS and Report Card Alignment Conventions: 3rd-L.3.2 4th-L.4.2, L.4.3b 5th-L.5.2 6th-L.6.2 & L.6.3 The narrative, real or imagined, has an effective plot helping create unity and completeness: effective, consistent use of a variety of transitional strategies logical sequence of events from beginning to end effective opening and closure for audience and purpose The narrative, real or imagined, provides thorough and effective elaboration using details, dialogue, and description: effective use of a variety of narrative techniques that advance the story or illustrate the experience The narrative, real or imagined, clearly and effectively expresses experiences or events: effective use of sensory, concrete, and figurative language clearly advance the purpose The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a strong command of conventions: few, if any, errors in usage and sentence formation effective and consistent use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling The narrative, real or imagined, has an evident plot helping create a sense of unity and completeness, though there may be minor flaws and some ideas may be loosely connected: adequate use of a variety of transitional strategies adequate sequence of events from beginning to end adequate opening and closure for audience and purpose The narrative, real or imagined, provides adequate elaboration using details, dialogue, and description: adequate use of a variety of narrative techniques that generally advance the story or

illustrate the experience The narrative, real or imagined, adequately expresses experiences or events: adequate use of sensory, concrete, and figurative language generally advance the purpose The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates an adequate command of conventions: some errors in usage and sentence formation but no systematic pattern of errors is displayed adequate use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling The narrative, real or imagined, is somewhat maintained and may have a minor drift in focus: inconsistently establishes a setting, narrator and/or Developing characters, and point of view (NM) The narrative, real or imagined, has an inconsistent plot, and flaws are evident: inconsistent use of basic transitional strategies with little variety uneven sequence of events from beginning to end opening and closure, if present, are weak weak connection among ideas The narrative, real or imagined, provides uneven, cursory elaboration using partial and uneven details, dialogue, and description: narrative techniques, if present, are uneven and inconsistent The narrative, real or imagined, unevenly expresses experiences or events: partial or weak use of sensory, concrete, and figurative language that may not advance the purpose The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a partial command of conventions: frequent errors in usage may obscure meaning inconsistent use of punctuation,

capitalization, and spelling The narrative, real or imagined, may be maintained but may provide little or no focus: may be very brief may have a major drift focus may be confusing or ambiguous The narrative, real or imagined, has little or no discernible plot: few or no transitional strategies are evident frequent extraneous ideas may intrude The narrative, real or imagined, provides minimal elaboration using little or no details, dialogue, and description: use of narrative techniques is minimal, absent, in error, or irrelevant The narrative, real or imagined, expression of ideas is vague, lacks clarity, or is confusing: uses limited language may have little sense of purpose The narrative, real or imagined, demonstrates a lack of command of conventions: errors are frequent and severe and meaning is often obscured 4 3 Proficient (M) The narrative, real or imagined, is adequately focused and generally maintained throughout: adequately establishes a setting, narrator and/or characters, and point of view* 2 1 Merging (NY) 0 A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to [fill in with key language from the intended target]. Working Drafts of ELA rubrics for assessing CCSS writing standards --- (2010) Karin Hess, National Center for Assessment [[email protected] Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Grade 6 Central Idea Note-Taking Page Teacher Directions:

Use this process to teach students how to answer a central idea prompt. Be sure to model how to restate the prompt in the topic sentence; students know how to use direct quotes from the text; students elaborate on how each quote connects to the central idea (how do they know this); model adding transitionsthese help the reader/scorer follow students thinking. Name______________________ Passage ________________________ Central Idea ______________________ 1. Determine the central idea. The central idea becomes your topic sentence in your paragraph response. A. Who or what is the article mostly about? B. What is important about the who or the what? C. Combine A and B to state the central idea. 2. Provide text evidence and explain how the evidence connects to the central idea. First evidence and explanation Second evidence and explanation Third evidence and explanation 3. Conclusion Restate your central idea from 1c using synonyms to make it different from the topic sentence. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Grade 6 Central Idea Note-Taking Page Student Page Name______________ Passage _______________ Central Idea ____________________________ Directions: Complete the following steps to answer a prompt on central idea. 1. Determine the central idea. The central idea becomes your topic sentence in your paragraph response. Be sure to restate the prompt first. A. Who or what is the article mostly about? ___________ B. What is important about the who or the what? C. Combine A and B to state the central idea. 2. Provide text evidence and explain how the evidence connects to the central idea. A. First evidence and explanation B. Second evidence and explanation C. Third evidence and explanation 3. Conclusion A. Restate your central idea from 1c using synonyms to make it different from the topic sentence. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond ELP 6th 8th Grade Band Standards Organized by Modality This performance task is based on writing. As an option if youd like to monitor growth for ELP as a second goal, teachers can choose to assess ELP standard 4 because it aligns with this specific performance task. Your students full composition can be analyzed to identify English language proficiency levels. It is evident that students will be navigating through the modalities to get to the end product. However, it is important to keep in mind what the full opinion writing performance task is assessing and how deeply the student understands class content and language. The ELP growth goal is to provide the just-right scaffolds for students to demonstrate their understanding in order for them to move from one proficiency level to the next. Receptive modalities*: Ways in which students receive communications from others (e.g., listening, reading, viewing). Instruction Listening and assessment of receptive modalities & reading focus on students communication of their understanding of the meaning of communications from others. Speaking & Writing

Listening, speaking, reading, and writing Standard An ELL can construct meaning from oral presentations and literary and informational text through grade-appropriate listening, reading, and viewing 8 determine the meaning of words and phrases in oral presentations and literary and informational text 3 speak and write about grade-appropriate complex literary and informational texts and topics 4 construct grade-appropriate oral and written claims and support them with reasoning and evidence 7 adapt language choices to purpose, task, and audience when speaking and writing 2 5 participate in grade-appropriate oral and written exchanges of information, ideas, and analyses, responding to peer, audience, or reader comments and questions conduct research and evaluate and communicate findings to answer questions or solve problems By the end of an English language proficiency level, an ELL in grades 6-8 can ... 1 express an opinion construct Interactive modalities*: Collaborativeabout a gradefamiliar use of receptive and productive appropriate topic. modalities as students engageoral in and written conversations, provide and obtain claims and and information, express feelings Productive supportopinions them emotions, and exchange

with reasoning (S & W) (Phillips, 2008, p. 3). and evidence. 4 9 - create clear and coherent grade-appropriate speech and text in which students communicate to others (e.g., speaking, writing, and drawing). Instruction and assessment of productive modalities focus on students communication of their own understanding or interpretation. - make accurate use of standard English to communicate in grade-appropriate speech and writing Productive modalities*: Ways 1 2 construct a claim about a familiar topic, and give a reason to support the claim. 3 4 5 gather information gather information from gather information from from multiple provided multiple print & digital multiple print & digital sources, print & digital sources & sources, using search using search terms effectively; & summarize or terms effectively; quote or (at Grade 8) evaluate the paraphrase paraphrase the data & credibility of each source; quote observations, ideas, & conclusions of others, or paraphrase the data & information, with using charts, diagrams, or conclusions of others, using labeled illustrations, other graphics, as charts, diagrams, or other diagrams, or other analyze appropriate; & cite graphics, as appropriate; cite and critique the arguments of others orally and& in 6

graphics, as appropriate, writingsources, using a standard sources, using a standard format & cite sources. format for citation. for citation. Oregon ELP Standards Aligned with Performance Task, 2014; Arcema Tovar Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Narrative Writing Pre-Assessment Student and Class Scoring: Scoring Key: Total # Correct 1 = Emerging 0-4 2 = Developing 3 = Proficient 4 = Exemplary School Year: Grade: Teachers Name: 5-7 School: 8 - 10 11 - 12 Student Name: Focus and Organization Score Elaboration and Conventions Evidence Score Student Total Score 1. 2. 3. 4. 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 9 0 10 0

11 0 12 0 13 0 14 0 15 0 16 0 17 0 18 0 19 0 20 0 21 0 22 0 23 0 24 0 25 0 26 0 27 0 28 0 29

0 30 0 31 0 32 0 33 0 34 0 35 0 Rev. Control: 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond ELP Score A note about constructed responses: Constructed response answers are not written in stone. There is no perfect way a student should respond. Look for the general intent of the prompt and student response and follow the rubric below as much as possible. Use your best judgment. Unlike DOK-1 questions where there is one right and wrong answer, constructed responses are more difficult to assess. Overall consistency of intent based on most of your student responses can guide you. Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 2 Ability to locate, select, interpret and integrate information. Question #7 Prompt: How does the video The Story of a Pony Express Rider, add meaning to the passage A Pony Express Rider? Use details and examples from both versions. Teacher /Rubric Language Response The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to locate and select information that supports specifically how the video The Story of a Pony Express Rider, adds or contributes to the passage A Pony Express Rider. The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to interpret and integrate information from the video, The Story of a Pony Express Rider and support with key details how it contributes to meaning or understanding the passage A Pony Express Rider better. Information students could use to support how the video contributes to meaning of the passage may include (1) the excitement and tone of the speaker helps understand how it must have felt to be a rider on the Pony Express, (2) hearing the language from a real rider, (3) how the riders were thrilled to be doing their jobs even though it was dangerous they were a different kind of folks, (4) the dangers didnt deter them from signing up, (5) the personal story of going into bad weather and the difficulties encountered, (6) the personal anxiety of not making the station in time, (7 ) protecting the mochila was all important the rider carried it over his head when in water so it wouldnt get wet and (8) how difficult it was for some to sign a contract, not use bad words or gamble but they did anyway. Student Language Response Example The student locates and selects sufficient information to explain how the video contributes meaning to the passage while integrating examples from both versions. 2 The passage A Pony Express Rider is about how a boy who became a Pony Express rider. The video The Story of a Pony Express Rider is narrated by an older man who is remembering his own days as a Pony Express rider. The video added meaning to the passage for me by giving the Pony Express rider a real voice with excitement. When I listen to the video I can imagine how the boy must have felt too when he signed the contract to be a rider. The old man said being a rider was more important than giving up a few things . The old man encountered dangerous weather and was afraid he wouldnt make his route in 8 hours. The entire time he protected the mochila. The boy in the story spoke about the built-in pouch on his special saddle to hold the mochila. It adds meaning to how important the mochila was and to always make sure it got to its owners safely. Overall the video just brought more life to the story which made it more exciting to read and think about. The student locates and selects minimal information to explain how the video contributes meaning to the passage but does not integrate examples from both versions.

1 The passage about the boy who wants to become a Pony Express rider told how he did it. He had to sign a contract and be strong as well as not be afraid of anything. Pony Express riders were really brave. More than anything they had to get their mail through. The video was good too. The guy in the video talked about how he used to be a Pony Express rider too. The student does not give enough evidence of the ability to locate, select, interpret and integrate information. 0 Pony Express riders were really young kids who could ride horses fast. We saw a video and read a story about Pony Express riders. If I were a rider I would have to be born over 100 years ago and Im not sure if I could ride a horse that well anyway. I think they were brave. Toward R.6.7 DOK 4 - SYH Synthesize the experiences of reading, listening or viewing the same version of a text in order to make a recommendation of the benefits of each. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Note: Brief writes are scored with a 2-3 point rubric. Full compositions are scored with a 4 point rubric. The difference between this rubric and the constructed response reading rubrics, is that the Brief Write Rubric is assessing writing proficiency in a specific area, while the reading rubrics are assessing comprehension. Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 3 Ability to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information such as fact from opinion Question #8 Prompt: How are the themes in the video The Story of a Pony Express Rider, and the passage A Pony Express Rider similar? Use details and examples from both versions in your answer. Teacher /Rubric Language Response The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information. Students must first identify the theme that is common across both versions/ sources. Relevant information would include evidence that supports similarities between common themes. A theme is different than a topic. A topic would be Pony Express Riders the theme could allude to: that there are benefits and drawbacks to being a Pony Express rider. Relevant information to support the similarities between this theme in both versions as benefits of being a rider could include that: (1) both riders felt money was a benefit to being a Pony Express rider, (2) there was a sense of pride for both riders, (3) being able to do a difficult job well and (4) always getting the mochila through to the next rider or owner. Relevant information to support the similarities between themes in both versions as drawbacks to being a rider could include (1) having to sign a contract to give up activities, (2) fear of being attacked and (3) the long rides at top galloping speeds. Student Language Response Example Student is able to identify a common theme between both versions and distinguish relevant information supporting that theme using details and examples from both sources. 2 The theme in both versions of being a Pony Express rider is that the riders experienced both the good and the bad. The good part about being a Pony Express rider is that in the video version the Pony Express rider stated how much money he earned and in the passage the rider expressed that $100.00 a month was a lot of money. There was also pride for being able to be a rider. In the video , the narrator said that he and the other riders were young, strong and fast and excited to be riders. The boy in the passage also mentioned that he was a good horseman and could rider faster than any of his friends. Another common good thing was that both were proud to be able to deliver the mochila, safely. The video rider even held the mochila above his head to keep it safe from getting wet. Some of the bad things about being riders in the Pony Express are that both sources talked about the dangerous territory and the fear of being attacked. The boy encountered trouble at a station where a rider had been killed, while the video narrator had to go through dangerous weather. Although there were good and bad throughout both sources, I there was more pride than anything about being able to do such a tough job! Student is able to somewhat identify a common theme between both versions and use some relevant information supporting that theme but with minimal or no details from both sources. 1 0 Both of the stories about being a Pony Express rider were about what it was like and how it was sometimes great and sometimes scary like when the riders were attacked. Riding for a long time really

made them tired. Sometimes theyd have to go for 100 miles at a fast gallop. Both the stories talked about this. Student is not able to identify a common theme between both versions or identify relevant information to support a common theme. I liked the video the best. The man was dressed like a real Pony Express rider. The passage was OK but it was harder to really get into because there were so many words. RL.6.9 DOK 4 - SYU Synthesizes information across multiple sources or texts for the purpose of comparing approaches to similar themes or topics. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Note: Brief writes are scored with a 2-3 point rubric. Full compositions are scored with a 4 point rubric. The difference between this rubric and the constructed response reading rubrics, is that the Brief Write Rubric is assessing writing proficiency in a specific area, while the reading rubrics are assessing comprehension . Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Constructed Response Answer Key Standard RI.6.8 Point Reading Constructed Response Rubric Question #15 Prompt: Support the claim that the exploration of Naru Island was important. Give reasons and evidence from the article PT-109. Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: Sufficient Evidence should connect important points that show why the exploration of Naru Island was important. Students should locate information form Part 2 of PT-109 that supports why the exploration was important. Specific identifications (supporting details) would be that (1) candy and water were found as well as a canoe and (2) two islanders saw the captain and the other PT-109 crew members. Full Support (other details) could include (1) that the candy and water possibly helped keep the men alive, (2) and the canoe enabled them to take the candy and water to the other crewmen. Students could d also include that if the two islanders had not seen the captain and the crewman on Naru Island the crew of PT-109 might not have been rescued. Student gives sufficient reasons and/or examples from the article to support the claim that the exploration of Naru was important. 3 2 1 0 The exploration of Naru Island was very important in two ways. The captain and one crewman went ahead to Naru Island. First, the two men found candy and water an old wrecked vessel. They also found a canoe. The canoe provided a way for the men to return to the other crewmen. This was important because they men needed water and food to stay alive. Secondly, the captain and one crewman were spotted by two islanders. This was important because the islanders eventually helped the crew of PT-109 get rescued. This is why the exploration of Naru was important! Student gives some reasons and/or examples from the article to support the claim that the exploration of Naru was important. It was very important that the captain and another man went to explore Naru Island. They found candy and water. They found a canoe. They were even seen by two islanders. Later the same two islanders helped rescue the men. The student gives minimal reasons and/or examples from the article to support the claim that the exploration of Naru was important. Naru Island had lots of things on it for the men to explore. It was a good thing they explored the island because they needed some of the things they found on it to survive . The student does not address the prompt specifically. The men on PT-109 were really brave and were stranded. It was important for them to find a way to be rescued. Toward RI.6.8 DOK 3- APx Explain how a claim supports a specific argument using reasons and evidence Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Note: Brief writes are scored with a 2-3 point rubric. Full compositions are scored with a 4 point rubric. The difference between this rubric and the constructed response reading rubrics, is that the Brief Write Rubric is assessing writing proficiency in a specific area, while the reading rubrics are assessing comprehension.

Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Research Constructed Response Answer Key Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 4 ability to cite evidence to support opinions and/or ideas Question #16 Prompt: List two examples with reasons supporting the U.S. Navys claim that John F. Kennedy, showed extreme heroic conduct. Use facts and details found explicitly in the article PT-109. Teacher /Rubric Language Response The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to cite evidence to support the idea or opinion stated by the U.S. Navy that John F. Kennedy showed extreme heroic conduct. Students should select two examples (with reasons of how or why) supporting this prompt. Students should select two examples from of the captains heroic courage from the article PT-109. Some of the examples and reasons why the examples showed heroism : (1) After the collision the captain searched for his crew. Reason - The captain swam alone in the night until all of the men were accounted for. (2) The decision to swim 3 miles away. Reason - The captain had to pull a man to safety with his teeth for 5 hours and then went back to help another. (3) The captain swam to look for help when he saw a Japanese barge nearby. Reason The captain almost drowned searching for help. (4) He directed his men to Olasa Island . Reason Once again he had to direct men in open waters to safety and some were injured. (5) He explored Naru Island. Reason He risked again being spotted by the enemy. He saw two islanders that could have not been friendly. There may be other examples justifiable within the article. Student Language Response Example 2 Student presents sufficient evidence by citing two examples with reasons to support the idea that the captain of PT109 showed heroism. The emphasis being on supporting the statement. John F. Kennedy showed extreme heroic conduct in 1943 when a Japanese Destroyer collided with and sank the PT109 boat. One example of this courage occurred after he made the decision that his remaining crew should swim to island for safety over three miles away. This decision required heroic courage because the captain (John F. Kennedy) did not worry about himself. His concern was getting his men to safety. For instance, he pulled a badly burned crewman with his teeth for five hours in the ocean. Then, he went back to help a man with an injured leg! Another example of his courage after he spotted a Japanese barge near the island where he had taken his men. He decided to try to find help and started to swim to search for other PT Boats. This decision was courageous because again he did not worry about his own well-being. He almost drowned when a strong ocean current pulled him into deeper waters. These are only two examples of why John F. Kennedy showed, extreme heroic courage. 1 Student presents limited evidence by citing two examples to support the idea that the captain of PT-109 showed heroism. One example has supporting evidence and reasons, but one does not. John F. Kennedy received a medal for having courage and being a hero by the U.S. Navy. I agree that he was a hero. One example was after his boat collided with a destroyer John F. Kennedy did not give up. He looked for all of his crew and told them to go back to the wreckage. I think this took courage because he could have been exhausted and just waited for help instead of doing something about it. Another example is when he went to Naru Island. That also took courage. 0 Student presents no evidence to support the idea that the captain of PT-109 showed heroism. A hero is someone who helps other people and dont worry about how it could hurt them. Toward RI.3.9 and Research Target 4 Target 4 Ability to cite evidence to support opinions and ideas. RI.6.9 Synthesize key details presented in two texts about the same topic, correlating the most important points into one conclusion. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Note: Brief writes are scored with a 2-3 point rubric. Full compositions are scored with a 4 point rubric. The difference between this rubric and the constructed response reading rubrics, is that the Brief Write Rubric is assessing writing proficiency in a specific area, while the reading rubrics are assessing comprehension. Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Brief Write Narrative Constructed Response Answer Key Organization: Conclusion and Temporal Words Writing Standard: W.6.3c Target: 1a Narrative Writing Write a Brief Text, W.3c Temporal Words, Writing Target 1a Question #17 Prompt: In one or two paragraphs, write an ending for the narrative that follows naturally from the events or experiences in the narrative.

Before Long Traveling alone to Missouri from California has been a long, difficult journey. I left behind three little brothers and my dad. But now as a Pony Express rider I have made enough money to send for my brothers and my dad to join me. My mother had died long ago, but at least the rest of us could once again be together. Teacher /Rubric Language Response Directions for Scoring: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text. Be very specific and detailed. Teacher Language and Scoring Notes: The student response should provide a conclusion (1-2 paragraphs) that logically follows and supports the preceding information about the events and experiences of the characters in the story. The conclusion should have a statement that explains what happened after the Pony Express rider sent for his brothers and dad to join him in Missouri. Students should use temporal words to signify event changes from beginning to end. Student Language Response Example The response provides a transition from the body of the story to the conclusion and provides a satisfying ending to the narrative that follows logically from the events or experiences in the story. 2 1 0 So, I put enough money for my dad and three brothers in letter and sent it on its way through the Pony Express (of course!). It would take at least two weeks to make it all the way back to California. Eventually though my letter and the money will get there and I know theyll all be excited. Then, theyll have enough money to purchase their own wagon and everything they need to make the long journey to Missouri. I can hardly wait to see them all once again! The response provides a limited transition from the body of the story to the conclusion and provides a general or partial ending to the narrative that may provide some closure and/or somewhat logically from the events or experiences in the story. I sent some money right away to my dad. I know hell get here as soon as possible. They will all have a long way to go. The response does not complete the narrative in a logical way. They were all together and then had a wonderful time. They even built a house. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Grade 6 - Quarter 3 Pre-Assessment Selected Response Answer Key Question 1 Based on this sentence, which is an example of a Pony Express rider having the heart of a lion? Toward RL.6.4 DOK-2 APn A Question s What can the reader conclude about Pony Express Riders who are not in tip-top shape? RL.6.4DOK-3 ANA C Question 3. How is reading A Pony Express Rider most different than watching the Video Story of a Pony Express Rider? Toward RL.6.7 DOK-1 Cf B Question 4 From the video Story of a Pony Express Rider, what generalization can the listener assume about the mochila? Toward RL.6.7 DOK-3 Cu D Question 5 How is the experience of listening to the video, Story of a Pony Express Rider similar to reading A Pony Express Rider ? Toward RL.6.9 DOK-2 APn A Question 6 How is the experience of listening to the video, Story of a Pony Express Rider different than reading A Pony Express Rider ? Select the two answers that apply. Toward RL.6.9 DOK-2 ANr (both answers must be correct) B,D Question 7

Literary Constructed Response Toward RL.6.7 DOK 4- SYH 2 pts. Question 8 Literary Constructed Response Toward RL.6.9 DOK 4 -SYU 2 pts. Question 9 Why did the author choose to use the word home? Toward RI.6.4 DOK-2 APg A Question 10 What does from out of nowhere mean? Toward RI.6.4 DOK-2 APn B Question 11 Which summary statement best explains the captains reason to have his crew swim to an island three miles away? Toward RI.6.8 DOK-2 Ck C Question 12 What evidence would not support a claim that PT-109s mission was hazardous? Toward RI.6.8 DOK-2 ANs D Question 13 Why are the facts in the U.S. Navy citation different than those in the article PT-109? Toward RI.6.9 DOK-2 APn C Question 14 How are the events depicted in both the U.S. Navy citation and the article PT-109 alike and different? Toward RI.6.9 DOK-4 APn B Question 15 Informational Text Constructed Response Toward RI.6.8 DOK 3 APx 3 pts. Question 16 Informational Text Constructed Response Toward RI.6.9DOK 4 - SYU 2 pts. Write and Revise Question 17 Brief Write W.6.3c Question 18 Write/Revise: Which sentence would provide the best transition into a new paragraph? W.6.3b D Question 19 Choose the best two words to replace the underlined words. L.3a, L.6 B Question 20 A student needs to edit her sentences. Which two sentences do not have errors in grammar usage? L.6.1b (both must be correct). Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond B,D Grade

6 6 Student Copy Pre-Assessment Quarter 3 Name ____________________ Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Read the Directions. Part 1 You will read several literary and informational text sources and a video, about people who have overcome incredible challenges in their lives and can be thought of as heroes. As you read, take notes on these sources. Then you will answer several research questions about these sources. You are going to write a narrative about a fictional character who is or becomes a hero. Use details from the texts you have read or the video you watched to add to your narrative. Details could include a character in a similar situation as in the texts or character traits you've noted about heroes from the texts. Steps you will be following: In order to help you plan and write your narrative you will do all of the following: 1. Read the literary and informational texts and watch the video. 2. Answer several questions about the sources. 3. Plan your story. Directions for beginning: You will now read several literary and informational texts. Take notes because you may want to refer to your notes when you later plan your narrative story. You can refer to any of the sources as often as you like. Questions Answer the questions. Your answers to these questions will be scored. Also, they will help you think about the sources youve read, which should help you plan your narrative story. Part 2 Your assignment: These will help you plan to write a fictional narrative story about a character who is or becomes a hero. Use details from the texts you have read to add to your narrative. You will: 2. Plan your writing. You may use your notes and answers. 3. Write revise and edit your first draft (your teacher will give you paper). 4. Write a final draft of your narrative story. How you will be scored Purpose how well you maintain your focus, and establish a setting, narrator and/or characters. Organization how well the events logically flow from beginning to end using effective transitions and how well you stay on topic throughout the story. Elaboration: of evidence how well you elaborate with details, dialogue, and description to advance the story or illustrate the experience. Elaboration: of language and vocabulary Conventions how well you effectively express experiences or events using sensory, concrete, and figurative language that is appropriate for your purpose. how well you follow the rules of grammar, usage, and mechanics (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, etc.). Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond A Pony Express Rider Retold by Elizabeth Yeo Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3UmYfJEoEo

Grade Equivalent: 7.4 Lexile Measure:1010L Mean Sentence Length:15.90 Mean Log Word Frequency: 3.54 Word Count: 652 I had traveled by covered wagon to Sacramento California in 1860 all the way from Missouri. It was a long, difficult journey. I left behind three little brothers and my dad. My mother had died when I was little from consumption. I wanted to make money so I could send for my brothers and dad. I heard that in California you could join up with the Pony Express riders and make $100.00 a month. Important mail was sent through the Pony Express, because it guaranteed fast delivery. Dad always said I had the heart of a lion, because I dont scare easily. Even so, dad wasnt excited about my wanting to become a Pony Express rider. The job is known to be dangerous but I have all of the qualifications. Slight, wiry and only 16, Im a good horseman and can ride faster than any of my friends. Im not afraid of hard work and I never give up. As I entered the Pony Express Office I read a sign Guaranteed 14day delivery to most places, five day delivery to most places, five dollars. It wasnt as hard to get the job as I had thought. Not too many young men were willing to risk death. I had to sign a contract of sorts. I had to vow not to use bad words, gamble, or drink while I worked for the company. I always had to be in tiptoptop physical shape to protect myself from attacks. Several Pony Express riders had so far been killed enroute. I prayed that no disaster would strike me as I ferried the mail along the Pony Express Route. I was given a specialized, light-weight saddle that was developed with built-in pouches called the mochila, to carry the mail. Hazards abounded, including weather, terrain, hostile attackers and bandits. On my first run I rode the first leg of the journey to Texas. The letters were secured firmly under my saddle, in the mochila. I rode 100 miles at a fast gallop, and then passed the mochila along to another rider who took it through the dangerous territory of the Sierra Nevada Mountains before passing it onto the next man. Each of us riders would stop several times along the way to change horses, because a single horse would not be able to keep up such a fast galloping speed (around 25 miles an hour) for the 1,900day delivery to most places, five mile journey to Texas. After a few more turnovers, the letters would finally reach their destination and the local mailman delivered them. Sometimes I did encounter trouble. Once when I arrived at the Nevada station where I was supposed to hand off the mochila to the next rider, I found the station had been ransacked and the stationmaster and the next rider were both killed. I decided not to think of the devastation and just kept riding, driving my horse hard until I got to the next station. Other times, travelers on the trail would keep an expectant eye out for the appearance of us Pony Express riders. Suddenly, they would see us--a speck would appear in the distance, rapidly grow larger and a cheer would arise as we sped by and gave a wave of acknowledgement. That was always encouraging! It was always a pleasant surprise to hear a Hooray, or Thanks so much, from people who were waiting for important mail. I would usually just smile and nod. I never mentioned that their mail could have been lost along the way had I been hijacked. What mattered was that in the end, the letters would arrive on time. As far as I was concerned, it was a job well done, and there was nothing more to say about it. Before too long I would be able to send for my brothers and my dad. Thats the most important part of my job! Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 1. Read this sentence from Pony Express Rider. Dad always said I had the heart of a lion, because I dont scare easily. Based on this sentence, which is an example of a Pony Express rider having the heart of a lion? A. The Pony Express rider entered the dangerous territory of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. B. The rider waved to the crowd as he flew by on his horse. C. He rode faster than any other rider. D. The rider took pride in doing his job well. Toward RL.6.4 DOK 2 - APn Use context to determine the meaning (L.6.4a) of figurative, technical or connotative meaning of words and phrases. L.6.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context.

2. What can the reader conclude about Pony Express Riders who are not in tip-top shape? A. They are not willing to work long hours. B. They can rider faster than other riders. C. They can not protect themselves from attacks. D. They can better protect themselves from attacks. Toward RL.6.4 DOK 3 - ANA Analyze the impact of figurative word or phrases on meaning and tone. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 3. How is reading the story, A Pony Express Rider most different from watching the video Story of a Pony Express Rider? A. The passage, A Pony Express Rider explains what a Pony Express Riders job is. B. The reader has to use words to imagine what a Pony Express Rider may look, talk or act like. C. The importance of the mochila is mentioned. D. It is a longer story. Toward RL.6.7 DOK 1 Cf` Students can explain what they see and what they hear when reading a text. Do they see and hear the same thing when listening or watching a story, drama or poem? 4. Read the sentence from A Pony Express Rider. I was given a specialized, light-weight saddle that was developed with built-in pouches called the mochila, to carry the mail. From the video Story of a Pony Express Rider, what generalization can the listener assume about the mochila? A.The narrator did not mention the mochila. B.The mochila was kept in a special place. C.Pony Express Riders always carried a mochila. D.The safety and contents of the mochila were always protected. Toward RL.6.7 DOK 3 - Cu Connect specific characteristics of text, audio, visual or live versions of a story to examples seen or heard. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 5. How is the experience of listening to the video, Story of a Pony Express Rider similar to reading A Pony Express Rider ? A. Many of the same words are used and the overall meaning is about a Pony Express riders experience. B. Each version relies more on the readers own interpretation. C. Reading and listening to both versions take about the same amount of time. D. There are few if any similarities. Toward RL.6.9 DOK 2 - APn Applies understanding of how different genre approach themes topics. 6. How is the experience of listening to the video, Story of a Pony Express Rider different than reading A Pony Express Rider ?

Select the answers that apply. A.There is an emphasis on interpreting the meaning of words. B.The tone the story is told in creates a more dramatic mood. C.There are few if any differences. D.It is more interesting to listen to a real Pony Express Rider than to just read about one. Toward RL.6.9 DOK 2 - ANr Analyzes (compares and contrasts) how different text structures in different genres contribute to their approaches in similar themes and topics. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 7. How does the video The Story of a Pony Express Rider, add meaning to the passage A Pony Express Rider? Use details and examples from both versions. Toward R.6.7 DOK 4 - SYH Synthesize the experiences of reading, listening or viewing the same version of a text in order to make a recommendation of the benefits of each. 8. How are the themes in the video The Story of a Pony Express Rider, and the passage A Pony Express Rider similar? Use details and examples from both versions. RL.6.9 DOK 4 - SYU Synthesizes information across multiple sources or texts for the purpose of comparing approaches to similar themes or topics. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Article PT-109 Grade Equivalent: 6.1 Lexile Measure:860L Mean Sentence Length:13.23 Mean Log Word Frequency: 3.58 Word Count: 820 Elizabeth Yeo Part 1 August 1, 1943 The crew of 13 traveled in the night to avoid detection from the enemy. It was August 1, 1943 and America was at war. Their mission was to launch torpedoes at Japanese ships. U.S. Navy Patrol Torpedo (PT) boat 109 was nearing dangerous waters in the Pacific Ocean. The captain cut the engines so they wouldnt be heard. Then, the captain saw a shadow. He thought it was another PT boat. But, it wasnt. Suddenly a Japanese destroyer appeared from out of nowhere and collided with PT- 109, splitting it into two. One half of the boat quickly sank taking two crew members to an instant death. The explosion knocked the other 11 men into the water and away from the burning fuel. The captain of PT-109 searched for his crew. He sent them back to what was left of the boat. The men clung to the remaining wreckage, exhausted. The captain took stock of the situation. One man was badly burned, one had an injured leg, one had swallowed fuel and didnt know how to swim. Another man was not hurt but he also could not swim. At least they all wore life jackets. A decision had to be made. If they fired a flare gun it could attract the Japanese. If they waited there until daybreak for help they ran the risk of being spotted by the enemy. Regardless, the wrecked boat became their temporary home. But, it was taking in water and slowly sinking. The captain decided they would swim to the nearest island a little over three miles away. The two men who did not know how to swim held unto a plank from the boat while the others pushed and pulled them the best they could. The captain took hold of the badly burnt mans belt clasp with his teeth and pulled him as he swam to the island. It took over

five hours. Then, the captain returned to assist the man with the injured leg. The men collapsed and rested on the beach of the island they would begin to call Bird Island because of the bird guano on the bushes. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond PT-109 Part 2 August 2, 1943 The next day the captain was alarmed to see a Japanese barge pass close by Bird Island. He decided to swim where he thought other U.S. PT-boats would be, to try to get help. He found no other PT-boats. He nearly died when strong currents spun him into deeper waters. He rested the next day on Leorava island before he could find the strength to head back to Bird Island. August 4, 1943 When the captain arrived back at Bird Island he found the men hungry and thirsty. They all decided to swim to Olasana Island in hopes of finding food and fresh water. When they finally arrived, they found the small island had plenty of coconuts but they made the men sick. There was no fresh water and the night was cold and wet. August 5, 1943 The next day the captain and one crewman swam ahead to explore yet another island, Naru Island. There they found a wrecked Japanese vessel on a reef. Nearby was a small box containing Japanese candy. As they continued exploring Naru Island, they found a tin of water and even a canoe hidden in the bushes. Then they were discovered! Two frightened islanders saw them and paddled away in a canoe. The captain was disappointed that he could not make contact with the two islanders. August 6, 1943 They took the canoe they had found and headed back to Olasana Island where the other ten crew members were. They took with them the candy and water. They had a surprise when they got there. The two frightened islanders they had seen on Naru Island were talking to the other crew! Convinced they were Americans, the islanders said they wanted to help them. They agreed to deliver a help message to their allies (friends of the Americans). The captain scratched a help message on the husk of a green coconut. The islanders went off to deliver the message while the crew members of PT-109 waited. August 7, 1943 On August 7th, 1943 more islanders returned to the crew of PT-109. They brought food and water. and told the men that two U.S. Navy PT-boats were on their way to Olasana Island to rescue them. August 8, 1943 Early in the morning of August 8th, 1943 the exhausted men were awakened by yelling. The rescuers had arrived and the men were returned to an American base. The captain of the crew was Lieutenant John F. Kennedy. For his courage and leadership he was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal and a Purple Heart for his own injuries. Seventeen years later on November 8th, 1960 he would become the 35th president of the United States! Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond *Citation from THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY *Citation from THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY WASHINGTON WASHINGTON The President of the United States takes pleasure in The President theNAVY United States takes pleasure into presentingofthe & MARINE CORPS MEDAL presenting the NAVY & MARINE CORPS MEDAL to [Captain] LIEUTENANT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY [Captain] LIEUTENANT JOHN NAVAL FITZGERALD KENNEDY UNITED STATES RESERVE UNITED STATES RESERVE

for service as setNAVAL forth in the following for service as set forth in the following CITATION: CITATION: "For extremely heroic conduct as Commanding Officer of Motor Torpedo Boat 109 following the "For collision extremely heroic conduct Commanding Officer of Area Motor Boat1943. 109 following theof and sinking of thatasvessel in the Pacific War onTorpedo August 1-2, Unmindful collision and sinking of that vessel the Pacific War Area on August 1-2,unhesitatingly 1943. Unmindful of the personal danger, Lieutenant (theninLieutenant, Junior Grade) Kennedy braved personal danger, Lieutenant, Kennedy unhesitatingly braved difficulties andLieutenant hazards of (then darkness to directJunior rescueGrade) operations, swimming many hours to the secure difficulties and hazards of darkness to direct rescue operations, swimming many hours

to secure aid and food after he had succeeded in getting his crew ashore. His outstanding courage, aid and food he had contributed succeeded intogetting his crew ashore. Hisand outstanding courage, endurance andafter leadership the saving of several lives were in keeping with the endurance and leadership contributed to the saving of several were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United Stateslives Navaland Service." highest traditions of the United States Naval Service." *citation: to award a For the President, medal to honor For the President, Secretary of the Navy Secretary of the Navy someone who shows courage Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 9. Read the sentence from Part 1 of PT-109. The wreckage became their temporary home. Why did the author choose to use the word home? A. The word home represents safety. B. A home is a place to live. C. The word home means the men were like family. D. The men had no other home. Toward RI.6.4 DOK 2 - APg L.6.5c Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar definitions. 10. Read the sentence from Part 1 of PT-109 Suddenly a Japanese destroyer appeared from out of nowhere and collided with PT-109. What does the phrase from out of nowhere mean? A. The Japanese destroyer was nowhere to be found. B. The Japanese destroyer seemed to arrive suddenly and unexpectedly. C. The Japanese destroyer looked like a shadow. D. The Japanese destroyer collided with PT-109. RI.6.4 DOK 2 - APn Use context to determine the meaning (L.6.4a) of figurative, technical or connotative meaning of words and phrases. L.6.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context.

Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 11. Which summary statement best explains the captains reason to have his crew swim to an island three miles away? A. The men were injured. B. The men all wore life jackets. C. They might be spotted by the enemy. D. The wreckage was sinking. Toward RI.6.8 DOK 2- Ck Concludes if there is sufficient claim to support an argument. 12. What evidence would not support a claim that PT-109s mission was hazardous? A. The captain cut his engines so they wouldnt be heard. B. They were nearing dangerous waters in the Pacific Ocean. C. They traveled at night to avoid detection from the enemy. D. PT boats were essential to the U.S. Navy. Toward RI.6.8 DOK 2- ANs Distinguish between evidence that supports or not, specific claims in a text . Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 13. Why are the facts in the Citation from the Secretary of the Navy different than those in the article PT-109? A. The U.S. Navy citation states different facts than those in the article PT-109. B. The article PT-109 states facts about the experience Kennedy and the other crew-men had. C. The purpose of the U.S. Navy citation is different than the article PT-109 and requires different facts D. The article PT-109 states facts about how the captain and crew survived. Toward RI.6.9 DOK 2 - ANp Explain if a persons memoir presents events the same as a biography written about the same person. 14. How are the events depicted in both the Citation from the Secretary of the Navy and the article PT-109 alike and different? A. Both have facts and details about the captains courage. B. Both give examples of the captains courageous acts but from different perspectives. C. Both depict a sequence of events of PT-109s situation. D. Both present the same facts but in different ways. Toward RI.6.9 DOK 4-ANP Gather, analyze and organize multiple information sources from memoirs and biographies of two or more person Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 15. Why was the exploration of Naru Island important? Give details and examples from the article PT-109. DOK 3- APx Explain how a claim supports a specific argument using reasons and evidence 16. List two examples with reasons supporting the U.S. Navys claim that John F. Kennedy, showed extreme heroic conduct. Use facts and details found explicitly in the article PT-109. DOK 4 - SYU Synthesizes information across multiple sources or

texts for the purpose of comparing approaches to similar themes or topics. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 17. In one or two paragraphs, write an ending for the narrative that follows naturally from the events or experiences in the narrative. Brief Write, Organization, W.6.3c, writing a conclusion temporal words Target 1a Before Long Traveling alone to Missouri has been a long, difficult journey. I left behind three little brothers and my dad. But now as a Pony Express rider I have made enough money to send for my brothers and my dad to join me. My mother had died long ago, but at least the rest of us could once again be together. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 18. A student is writing a report about PT-109. The student wants to add a sentence to the paragraphs below with dialogue that would most logically transition into a third paragraph. Revise a Text, W.3b Dialogue Elaboration, Writing Target 1b By the time we reached the shore, the Captain and I were out of breath. Sweat was trickling into my eyes. Where . . .are. . .they? he asked in short gasps as we looked beyond the shore. The natives were our only hope for rescue. We had to make contact with them! I was dizzy from swimming so hard, so I didnt notice them until the Captain pointed. The natives saw us and were scared. They were running back to their canoe. Which sentence would provide the best transition into a third paragraph? A. It was nice to have spotted the natives. Were worn out, I said. Can we just rest here for awhile? B. The Captain and I wandered over to where the natives had been. Captain, I said, Would you mind telling me what time it is? \ C. Weve got to get out of here, I said. The Captain agreed. ` D. Now what are we going to do? I said. We needed to talk to the natives to get help. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond 19. A student is writing an article for his class newspaper, about how people show bravery in different ways. Read a section of the draft below and complete the task that follows. Language and Vocabulary, L.6.3a Audience, Writing Target 8 Many firefighters, police officers and rescue workers rushed to help the the victims. Many other men and women were helpers. Everyone wanted to bring relief and aid to the victims.

The student wants to make sure that his word choices are appropriate to inform his audience about his topic. Choose the best two words to replace the underlined words. A. hinder, agreeing B. assist, volunteers C. hold back, unpaid D. support, comforters 20. A student needs to edit her sentences. Which two sentences do not have errors in grammar usage? Edit and Clarify L.61b, speech order Intensive Pronouns Target 9 A. The soldiers himself was very brave. B. The horse itself made its way through the icy snow. C. We ourself decided to rescue the victims. D. I myself am exhausted from all this work. Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Part 2 You will: 1. Plan your writing. You may use your notes and answers. 2. Write revise and edit your first draft (your teacher will give you paper). 3. Write a final draft of your narrative story. Your assignment: You are going to write a narrative about a fictional character who is or becomes a hero. Use details from the texts you have read or the video you watched to add to your narrative. Details could include a character in a similar situation as in the texts or character traits you've noted about heroes from the texts. How you will be scored Purpose how well you maintain your focus, and establish a setting, narrator and/or characters. Organization how well the events logically flow from beginning to end using effective transitions and how well you stay on topic throughout the story. Elaboration: of evidence how well you elaborate with details, dialogue, and description to advance the story or illustrate the experience. Elaboration: of language and vocabulary Conventions how well you effectively express experiences or events using sensory, concrete, and figurative language that is appropriate for your purpose. how well you follow the rules of grammar, usage, and mechanics (spelling, punctuation,

capitalization, etc.). Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond STOP Close your books and wait for instructions! Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond Student Scoring Color the box green if your answer was correct. Color the box red if your answer was not correct. Literary Text 1 I use context to determine the meaning of figurative, technical or connotative meaning of words and phrases and interpret figures of speech. RL.6.4 2 I analyze the impact figurative words or phrases have on the meaning or tone of a text. RL.6.4 3 I describe what I see and hear when listening or watching a story, drama or poem. RL.6.7 4 I know specific differences in text, audio, visual or live versions of a story compared to examples Ive seen or heard. RL.6.7 5 I understand how different genres approach themes and topics. RL.6.9 6 I compare and contrast how the text structures of different genres contribute to their approaches in similar themes and topics. RL.6.9 7 I can read, listen or view the same version of a text and explain the benefits of each kind. RL.6.7 2 1 0 8 I compare approaches to similar themes or topics across multiple texts. RL.6.9 2 1 0 Informational Text 9 I can distinguish which connotations of words with similar definitions are best to use . RI.6.4 10

I can use context to determine the meaning (L.6.4a L.6.5a) of figurative, technical or connotative meaning of words and phrases. RI.6.4 11 I can conclude if a claim is sufficient enough to support an argument. RI.6.8 12 I can distinguish between evidence that supports a claim and evidence that does not support a claim. RI.6.8 13 I can explain how or why facts about a persons life are presented differently in two text types. RI.6.9 14 I can draw conclusions about the similarities-differences between texts (a memoir, biography , etc..) written about the same person. RI.6.9 15 I can explain how a claim supports a specific argument using reasons and evidence RI.6.8 2 1 0 16 I can gather, analyze and organize multiple information sources about a person in order to write an essay or present a speech. RI.6.9 2 1 0 2 1 0 3 Writing 17 In one or two paragraphs, write an ending for the narrative that follows naturally from the events or experiences in the narrative. W.6.3c 18 Which sentence would provide the best transition into a new paragraph? W.6.3b 19 Choose the best two words to replace the underlined words. L.6.3a, L.6.6 20 A student needs to edit her sentences. Which two sentences do not have errors in grammar usage? L.6.1b (both must be correct). Rev. Control: 01/07/2015 11/10/2014 HSD OSP and Susan Richmond

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