Sentential Logic - michaeljohnsonphilosophy.com

Sentential Logic - michaeljohnsonphilosophy.com

Sentential Logic One of our main critical thinking questions was: Does the evidence support the conclusion? How do we evaluate whether specific evidence supports a specific conclusion? How do we answer this question? Arguments The word argument as it is used normally in

English, means something like this: An exchange of diverging or opposite views, typically a heated or angry one: I've had an argument with my father. Arguments In philosophy, we use the word argument differently. A philosophical argument: Is not an exchange of views

Doesnt need to present opposing or contrary views Is not typically heated or angry. Arguments Instead, a philosophical argument consists of two parts: the premises and the conclusion. The premises are the evidence that are given in support of the conclusion.

The conclusion is the claim that the premises are supposed to support. Example Premise 1: Either the butler is the murderer, or the gardener is the murderer. Premise 2: The butler is not the murderer. Therefore, Conclusion: The gardener is the murderer.

Relevance There is no requirement that the premises of an argument have anything to do with the consequent. For example, this is an argument: Premise: There are exactly 117 hairs on my hand. Conclusion: Its half past three oclock.

Deductive Validity We say that an argument is deductively valid when it has the following property: If the premises of the argument are true, then the conclusion of the argument must be true. A valid argument is truth-preserving: the truth of the premises gets passed on to the conclusion. Note

In ordinary English, the meaning of valid is slightly different. Deductive validity is a relation between premises and conclusion. Validity ordinarily means something like true or relevant. A valid criticism is a criticism that is true or relevant to some issue being discussed. Inductive Validity

We say that an argument is inductively valid when it has the following property: If the premises are true, then the conclusion is likely to be true. An inductive argument probably preserves truth. Example Suppose I eat at McDonalds. I eat there 100 times. The first time I eat there, I get sick. The

second time I eat there I get sick. In fact, on every occasion, each of the 100 times I ate there, I got sick every time. Example Premise 1: The first time I ate at McDonalds I got sick. Premise 2: The second time I ate at McDonalds I got sick.

Premises 3-99: Premise 100: The 100th time I ate at McDonalds I got sick. Conclusion: Next time I will get sick again! Example This is an inductively valid argument. If the premises are true, the conclusion is likely to be true too.

But it is not a deductively valid argument. (Why?) Soundness A sound argument is one that (i) is valid and (ii) has true premises. [And we can distinguish between deductively and inductively sound arguments.] Every sound argument is valid (by definition),

but the reverse is not true. Some valid arguments are not sound. Example Consider the following argument: Premise 1: All dogs have eight legs. Premise 2: I am a dog. Therefore, Conclusion: I have eight legs.

Example This argument is valid. If the premises are true, then the conclusion must also be true. If all dogs truly have eight legs, and I am truly a dog, then it is true that I have eight legs! However, the argument is not sound. The premises are false (and so is the conclusion). Comprehension Questions

Can arguments that are deductively valid have false conclusions? False premises? Can arguments that are not deductively valid have true conclusions? True premises? Can deductively sound arguments have false conclusions? Can arguments that are not deductively sound still be deductively valid?

Deductive Logic Deductive logic (often just called logic) is the study of deductively valid argument forms. Argument Forms Example Premise 1: If horses had wings, they could fly. Premise 2: Horses cannot fly. Therefore, Conclusion: Horses dont have wings.

Argument Forms Example Premise 1: If the butler committed the murder, then the murder weapon is the candlestick. Premise 2: The murder weapon is not the candlestick. Therefore, Conclusion: The butler did not commit the murder.

Argument Forms Example Premise 1: If Sally is free this evening, George will take her to dinner. Premise 2: George did not take Sally to dinner. Therefore, Conclusion: Sally was not free this evening. Argument Forms Example

All of these arguments share a deductively valid argument form: Premise 1: if A, then B. Premise 2: not B. Conclusion: not A. Any argument with this form is valid, no matter what A and B are. Argument Forms Example

Premise: Everyone is happy. Conclusion: There is not someone who is not happy. Premise: Everyone is F. Conclusion: There is not someone who is not F. Argument Forms Example Premise: You cant be happy and succesful. Conclusion: If youre happy, youre not

successful. Premise: not (A and B). Conclusion: if A then not B. Argument Forms Example Premise: Either Fred took the train or he took the ferry. Premise 2: Fred did not take the ferry. Conclusion: Fred took the train.

Premise: Either A or B. Premise: not B Conclusion: A Deductive Logic The goal of deductive logic is to identify deductively valid argument forms. We can use these as a formal test for validity: if an argument has a certain form, then that

argument is deductively valid. Invalidity An argument that is not valid is called invalid. Valid: If the premises are true, then the conclusion must be true. Invalid: The premises can be true while the conclusion is false.

Invalidity Unfortunately, there is no formal test for (deductive) invalidity. There is no way of looking at the form of an argument and telling that the premises do not guarantee the conclusion. Fallacies A fallacy is an invalid argument***, usually one that might mislead someone into thinking its

valid. ***Exception: Circular reasoning. Weve already encountered a number of fallacies in this course: the fallacy of quoting out of context, the regression fallacy, the conjunction fallacy, the base rate neglect fallacy, etc. No Formal Fallacies We must remember, however, that there are no formal fallacies (Wikipedia, for instance, is wrong

about this very fact). There is no way to tell, simply by looking at an arguments form that it is a bad argument (invalid). Logic can tell us that certain arguments are good, but it cant tell us that the rest are bad. Sentential Logic Sentential Logic (SL, also known as Propositional Logic, or the Propositional Calculus) is a formal

logical system that represents logical relations among sentences (or propositions). Syntax Every formal logical system has a syntax (or grammar) that defines which sequences of symbols are well-formed expressions (called well-formed formulas or WFFs) and which are ill-formed.

Sentential Variables In SL, simple sentences are represented by capital letters A, B, C, D, etc. These are sometimes called sentence letters or sentential variables theyre variables, because A can represent the sentence snow is white or the sentence snow is green or the sentence turtles love noodles, or whatever. By

convention, we prefer the letters P, Q, R, S for sentential variables. Connectives In English (and most other languages, but not for example in Piraha) various words allow you to make new, complex sentences out of other sentences. For example, consider the sentences snow is green and turtles love noodles. The

word and lets us make the complex sentence snow is green and turtles love noodles out of these two simple sentences. Examples of Connectives Snow is white. Grass is green. It is false that snow is white. Michael believes that snow is white.

It is possible that snow is white. Snow is white and grass is green. If snow is white, then grass is green. Truth-functional Connectives A connective is truth-functional if the truth of sentences involving the connective depends only on the truth of the sentences they have as parts.

For example and is truth-functional. Whether a sentence like P and Q is true depends only on whether P is true and whether Q is true. Truth-Functional Connectives So the sentence snow is white and grass is green is true, because snow is white is true and grass is green is true. Replace snow is white with any other true sentence, and the

result is still true. If all you know about P and Q is that P is true and Q is true, then you know that P and Q is also true. Or if you know that Q is false, you know that P and Q is false. You dont have to know what P and Q are. Non-Truth-Functional Connectives Some connectives are not truth-functional. You can replace true sentences in them with other

true sentences, and this can change whether they are true. Or you can replace false sentences in them with other false sentences, and this can change whether they are true. Example 1. CY Leung believes that illegal structures at his house are OK. 2. Its false that illegal structures at CY Leungs

house are OK. 3. Its false that dogs have 17 legs. 4. CY Leung believes that dogs have 17 legs. Even if (1) is true, substituting another false sentence (3) for its false part (2) results in a false sentence. Truth-Functional Connectives Sentential logic only contains truth-functional connectives, not non-truth-functional

connectives like CY Leung believes that___ or Its possible that____. SL Connectives Each truth-functional English connective is given an SL counterpart: not: ~ (called tilde) and: & (called ampersand) or: v (called wedge)

ifthen: (called arrow) if, and only if,: (called doublearrow) Definition of WFF i. All sentence letters are WFFs. ii. If is a WFF, then ~ is a WFF. is a WFF. iii. If and are WFFs, then ( & ), ( v ), ( ), ( ) are also WFFs. iv. Nothing else is a WFF.

Question: why do we use and here instead of, for example, P and Q? Demonstration Using the definition we can show that certain sequences of symbols are WFFs. For example (P(Q&~ is a WFF.R)) is a WFF By (i), P, Q, and R are all WFFs. By (ii) ~ is a WFF.R is a WFF.

By (iii), since Q and ~ is a WFF.R are WFFs, (Q&~ is a WFF.R) is a WFF By (iii), since P and (Q&~ is a WFF.R) are WFFs, (P(Q&~ is a WFF.R)) is a WFF. Ill-Formed Formulas Some sequences of symbols are not wellformed. Some examples include:

))PQ((( (~ is a WFF.P) P&Q (P and Q) Grammatical Categories (&) is a conjunction where and are the

first and second conjunct respectively. (v) is a disjunction where and are the two disjuncts. () is a conditional sentence where is the antecedent and the consequent. () is a biconditional sentence. ~ is a WFF. is the negation of . Examples

"(P&Q)" is a conjunction. "((P&Q)(RQ))" is a disjunction.(RQ))" is a disjunction. "~ is a WFF.(P(Q(RQ))" is a disjunction.S))" is the negation of "(P(QvS))". "~ is a WFF.(P&Q)" is the antecedent of

"(~ is a WFF.(P&Q)((P&S)Q))". Scope Every occurrence of a connective in a WFF has a scope. The scope of that occurrence is the smallest WFF that contains it. For example The scope of & in (~ is a WFF.(~ is a WFF.P&Q)P) is (~ is a WFF.P&Q) (~ is a WFF.(~ is a WFF.P&Q)P) is not a WFF. (~ is a WFF.(~ is a WFF.P&Q)P) is not a WFF.

(~ is a WFF.(~ is a WFF.P&Q)P) is a WFF, but is bigger than (~ is a WFF.P&Q) Occurrences Notice that the same symbol can occur different times in the same formula, and that its different occurrences can have different scopes. ~ is a WFF.((~ is a WFF.P&Q)&(RQ)) ~ is a WFF.((~ is a WFF.P&Q)&(RQ))

~ is a WFF.((~P&Q)&(RQ)) ~((~ is a WFF.P&Q)&(RQ)) Main Connective The main connective in a formula is the occurrence of the connective whose scope is widest (the scope of the occurrence of the connective = the formula). A formula is a conditional if its main connective

is , a conjunction if its &, a negation if its ~ is a WFF., etc. Since SL connectives are truth-functional, we can summarize the truth-functions they stand for in a truth-table. Negation

T F ~ F T Conjunction

T T F F T F

T F ( & ) T F F F

Disjunction T T F F

T F T F ( v ) T T T

F Biconditional T T F F

T F T F ( ) T

F F T The Material Conditional T T

F F T F T F

( ) T F T T

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