2015-2016 Washington Statewide Waste Characterization Study MEGAN WARFIELD

2015-2016 Washington Statewide Waste Characterization Study MEGAN WARFIELD

2015-2016 Washington Statewide Waste Characterization Study MEGAN WARFIELD MRW COORDINATOR MEETING MAY 18, 2017 Purpose of the Study State law directs Ecology to do studies and provide data to the locals (70.95.280). Support the State Solid and Hazardous Waste Plan, Moving Washington Beyond Waste and Toxics. Support the W2R Data Strategy take a critical look at the results and use them to steer future work and make decisions. Additional analysis tasks A packaging versus product analysis which group each of the 156 material types into packaging, products, or one of six other material groups. Detailed composition results for six waste generation areas Central, East, Northwest, Puget Sound, Southwest, and West. A comparison with the 2009 Study. A supplementary analysis which combines the data collected with an additional seven studies completed by other jurisdictions. Waste Generation Areas Total Number of Samples - West = 106 - Northwest = 57 - Puget Sound = 58 - Southwest = 120 - Central = 115

- East = 150 Annual Disposed Tonnage by Waste Generation Area, 2014 WASTE GENERATION AREAS ANNUAL DISPOSED TONNAGE Central WGA 518,121 East WGA 737,889 Northwest WGA 278,420 Puget Sound WGA 2,463,256 Southwest WGA 423,608 West WGA 168,243 Total 4,589,537

Estimate d Tons of Disposed Waste by Sector EST. PERCENTAGE OF DISPOSED EST. TONS DISPOSED WASTE SECTOR STATEWIDE Commercial 43.7% 2,007,171 Residential 34.0% 1,561,810 Self-hauled C&D 12.8% 589,638 Self-hauled Other 9.4% 430,918

100.0% 4,589,537 SECTOR Totals Material Classes & Types MATERIAL CLASSES NUMBER OF MATERIAL TYPES WITHIN CLASS Paper Packaging Paper Products Plastic Packaging Plastic Products Glass Metal Organics Wood Wastes Construction Materials Consumer Products Hazardous Wastes Residues Total 7 9 17 12 6 9 11 8 13 18

41 5 156 Overall Statewide Disposed Waste Stream Composition by Material Class, Combined Packaging and Products 0% 10% Paper 10.2% 2.3% Metal 5.8% Organics 28.5% Wood Wastes 12.3% Construction Materials 12.2% Consumer Products Hazardous and Special Waste Residues 30% 14.9%

Plastic Glass 20% 7.3% 1.1% 5.5% 40% 50% Overall Statewide Disposed Waste Stream - Fifteen Most Prevalent Material Types Material Inedible Food - Vegetative Edible Food - Vegetative Yard & Garden Waste - Leaves & Grass Disposable Diapers Compostable Paper Products Animal Manure Cardboard/KraftPaper Packaging Asphalt Roofing Painted Wood Engineered Wood R/C Metals Other Ferrous Metal Inedible Food - Meats, Fats, Oils Edible Food - Meat, Fats, Oils Dimensional Lumber Total Est. Percent 6.6% 6.1% 5.7%

4.6% 4.0% 3.5% 3.1% 3.0% 2.7% 2.6% 2.4% 2.3% 2.2% 2.1% 2.0% 52.8% Subtotals and totals in tables and figures may not exactly match due to rounding Cum. Percent 6.6% 12.7% 18.4% 23.0% 27.0% 30.4% 33.6% 36.6% 39.3% 41.8% 44.2% 46.5% 48.7% 50.8% 52.8% Est. Tons 305,174 278,572 260,664

209,214 184,006 159,100 143,398 139,459 122,526 118,266 108,017 106,823 99,891 95,918 91,815 2,422,843 Hazardous & Special Wastes Pesticides Fertilizers Herbicides Fungicides HID Lamps CFLs Fluorescent Tubes UV & Germicidal Lamps Asbestos Water Based Paints Solvent Based Adhesives Water Based Adhesives Oil Based Paint Oil Based Clear Coating Lacquer Varnish Urethane Coatings Deck Coatings & Floor Paint Field & Lawn Markings Rust Preventative Coatings Primers, Sealers, Undercoats Stains Water Repellants

Concrete, Masonry & Wood Water Proofers Solvents Caustic Cleaners Dry-Cell Batteries, Single Use Dry-Cell Batteries, Rechargeable Wet-Cell Batteries Gasoline/Kerosene Motor Oil Antifreeze Other Vehicle Fluids Oil Filters Explosives Medical Wastes Sharps Pharmaceuticals & Vitamins Other Cleaners/Chemicals Personal Care Products Other Potentially Hazardous Wastes Most Prevalent Hazardous Material Types Hazardous and Special Waste Tons Personal Care Products 5,212 Water Based Paints 2,580 Water Repellants 2,458 Solvent-based Glues

1,145 Other Potentially Hazardous Waste 1,066 Dry-cell Batteries - Single Use 1,037 Caustic Cleaners 640 Antifreeze 615 HID Lamps 578 Motor Oil 572 15,901 86% Comparisons to the 2009 Study Waste Categories (in tons) 2009 2016 Overall Statewide Disposed Waste Stream

4,978,496 4,589,537 Hazardous & Special Wastes 198,588 52,470 Hazardous & Special Wastes (minus diapers, medical waste, explosives, pharmaceuticals) 32,134 18,383 MRW Disposed vs. MRW Collected TONS OF MRW 60000 50000 Column1 40000 MRW in MSW 30000 Percent Collected: 20000 2009 = 33% 2015 = 38% 10000

0 2009 2015 Conventional Wisdom MRW is 2% of the MSW waste stream (1% HHW + 1% CESQG) Total MSW Tons 4,589,537 2% 91,791 MRW Tons Collected (2014) 11,334 Collection Rate 11% Waste Characterization Subtracting out medical waste, explosives, sharps, and pharmaceuticals: Total MSW Tons 4,589,537 MRW Tons 18,410 MRW Tons Collected (2014) 11,334

Collection Rate 38% But due to variability in the data, the range is actually 22% - 88% Impact of Product Stewardship Consumer Electronic Products Tons 2009 Tons 2015 E-Cycle Covered Products 32,102 6,004 Non-E-Cycle Products 40,202 28,219 Tons 2009 Tons 2015 CFLs 184 55 Fluorescent Tubes 64

14 HIDs n/a 578 LightRecycle Products Impact of Product Stewardship Special & Hazardous Wastes Tons 2009 Tons 2015 Latex 6,213 2,580 Oil-Based Paint 2,086 209 Other Paint Care Products n/a 3,053 Dry-Cell Batteries (if we had a battery program) 1,465

1,144 Pharmaceuticals 1,343 680 Total 11,107 7,666 Paint Care Products (if we had a paint program) Question s? Gretchen Newman: 360-407-6097 [email protected] Megan Warfield: 360-407-6963 [email protected] http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/swfa/solidwastedata/ Electronic Products in Disposed Wastes Overall Electronic Products 2009 Est. Percent Televisions - CRT Televisions - LCD VCR's, DVD's, DVR's Computer Monitors - CRT Computer Monitors - LCD Computers

Computer Peripherals* Computer Printers n/a Audio Equipment Gaming Equipment Other Consumer Electronics *Includes printers in 2009. +/- 0.583% 0.000% 0.033% 0.030% 0.006% 0.026% 0.074% 0.58% 0.00% 0.03% 0.03% 0.01% 0.02% 0.06% 0.083% 0.015% 0.603% 1.45% 0.05% 0.01% 0.32% 2009 Est. Tons 29,012 0

1,646 1,476 322 1,292 3,674 n/a 4,109 742 30,031 72,304 2015-16 Est. Percent 0.075% 0.008% 0.078% 0.027% 0.003% 0.019% 0.022% 0.081% 0.199% 0.001% 0.233% 0.75% +/0.06% 0.01% 0.10% 0.03% 0.00% 0.03% 0.03% 0.07% 0.30% 0.00% 0.25%

2015-16 Est. Tons 3,422 353 3,596 1,228 122 880 1,019 3,711 9,131 55 10,706 34,223 Batteries in Disposed Wastes Batteries Overall Est. Tons Dry-cell Batteries - Single Use Dry-cell Batteries - Rechargeable Wet-cell Batteries Totals 1,037 107 89 1,233 Residential Self-Haul (combined) Commercial Est. Tons

Est. Tons Est. Tons 833 14 0 847 42 8 31 81 162 85 58 304 Paint in Disposed Wastes Paints & Stains Overall Est. Tons Water Based Paints Oil-based Paint Oil-based Clear Coatings Lacquer Varnish Urethane Coatings Deck Coatings/Floor Paint Field/Lawn Markings Rust Preventive Coatings Primers/Sealers Stains Totals

2,580 209 23 0 225 173 0 0 0 29 0 3,239 Residential Self-Haul (combined) Commercial Est. Tons Est. Tons Est. Tons 1,972 10 4 0 225 0 0 0 0

18 0 2,230 143 193 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 355 465 5 0 0 0 173 0 0 0 12 0 654 Medical/Pharmaceutical/Personal Care Products in Disposed Wastes Medical/Pharmaceutical Overall Est. Tons Medical Wastes Sharps

Pharmaceuticals/Vitamins Personal Care Products Totals 33,380 27 680 5,212 39,299 Residential Self-Haul (combined) Commercial Est. Tons Est. Tons Est. Tons 3,525 22 373 4,481 8,400 4 0 252 594 850 29,851

5 55 137 30,049 Recoverable and NonRecoverable Materials in Waste Stream Overall Statewide Disposed Waste Stream Composition by Material Class 0% 10% Paper Packaging 7.2% Paper Products 7.7% Plastic Packaging Plastic Products Glass 20% 5.7% 4.5% 2.3% Metal 5.8% Organics 28.5%

Wood Wastes 12.3% Construction Materials 12.2% Consumer Products Hazardous and Special Waste Residues 30% 7.3% 1.1% 5.5% 40% 50% Overall Statewide Disposed Waste Stream Packaging, Products, and Other Material Groups 0% 10% Packaging 20% 15.2% Products

19.8% Metal 4.9% Organics 28.5% Wood Debris Construction Materials Hazardous and Special Waste Residues 30% 12.3% 12.2% 1.1% 6.0% 40% 50% Supplemental Section Supplemental Section Supplemental Statewide Results Overall Statewide Disposed Waste Stream Composition by Material Class 0% 10%

Paper Metal 10.2% 2.3% 5.3% Organics 21.3% Wood Wastes 15.2% Construction Materials Consumer Products Other Materials 30% 13.7% Plastic Glass 20% 13.3% 6.8% 11.9% 40% 50% Supplemental Statewide ResultsOverall

Statewide Disposed Waste Stream Ten Most Prevalent Material Types Carpet & Padding in Disposed Wastes Carpet & Padding Overall Est. Tons 64,873 43,981 108,854 Carpet Carpet Padding Totals Overall Carpet Carpet Padding 2009 Est. Percent 2.9% 0.7% 3.60% Residential Est. Tons 6,984 4,526 11,510 2009 Est. +/Tons 1.8%

145,282 0.8% 33,211 178,493 Self-Haul (combined) Est. Tons 54,893 36,102 90,995 2015-16 Est. Percent 1.4% 1.0% 2.40% Commercial Est. Tons 2,997 3,353 6,350 2015-16 Est. +/Tons 0.9% 64,873 0.8% 43,981 108,854 Other Consumer Products in Disposed Wastes Other Consumer Products Overall

Est. Tons Textiles - Organic 91,615 Textiles - Synthetic, Mixed, Unknown 75,742 Shoes, Purses, Belts 11,951 Tires & Rubber 30,118 Furniture 59,842 Mattresses 32,988 Totals 302,256 Residential Est. Tons 54,433 16,476 6,787 6,353 2,472 1,992 88,514 Self-Haul (combined) Est. Tons 12,038 6,652 705 5,025 27,025 23,624 75,068

Commercial Est. Tons 25,145 52,614 4,458 18,740 30,345 7,373 138,675 Commercial Waste Sector 0% 10% 20% Plastic 2.1% 7.6% Organics 26.6% 14.1% Wood Wastes 0% 50% Metal 3.4%

Organics 1.9% 2.4% Consumer Products 7.8% Consumer Products Residues 4.5% Hazardous and Special Waste Residues 40% 50% 42.5% Wood Wastes Construction Materials 30% 11.4% 3.2% 7.3% 1.7% 20% 18.6%

Glass Construction Materials Hazardous and Special Waste 10% Plastic 11.5% Metal 40% Paper 16.9% Paper Glass 30% Residential Waste Sector 6.5% 0.8% 9.3% Self-hauled C&D Waste Sector 0% Paper Plastic Glass

Metal Organics 10% 30% 40% 50% 60% 2.9% Glass 20% 10.6% 2.0% 8.1% Organics 2.1% 22.3% Wood Wastes 32.4% 54.2% 13.5% Construction Materials 12.9%

Consumer Products Hazardous and Special Waste 0.0% Hazardous and Special Waste Residues 0.2% Residues 30% 8.7% Metal 4.4% 1.1% 10% Plastic 0.5% Construction Materials 0% Paper 2.2% Wood Wastes

Consumer Products 20% Self-hauled Other Waste Sector 16.9% 1.3% 3.6% 40% 50%

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