The Renaissance and Reformation (13001650) Lesson 1 The

The Renaissance and Reformation (13001650) Lesson 1 The

The Renaissance and Reformation (13001650) Lesson 1 The Italian Renaissance The Renaissance and Reformation (13001650) Topic 4 Lesson 1 The Italian Renaissance Learning Objectives Describe the characteristics of the Renaissance and understand why it began in Italy. Identify Renaissance artists and explain how new ideas affected the arts of the period.

Understand how writers of the time addressed Renaissance themes. Explain the impact of the Renaissance. The Italian Renaissance

A New Worldview Ren thinkers did not break with European past but now brought new attitudes toward culture and learning Ren ideal was a person with many talents and skills in diff fields A Spirit of Adventure and Curiosity The Ren lead people to explore new worlds or reexamine old ones. Christopher Columbus is one of these adventurers Renaissance Humanism Humanist scholars studied classical Greek and Latin cultures in order to learn about their own times

Humanist believe that education should stimulate the individuals creative powers Petrarch (1300s) lived in Florence and he hunted down Greek and Roman manuscripts like Homer, Virgil, Cicero from monasteries and churches The Italian Renaissance The growth of urban areas helped spur and encourage a renewal of culture known as the Renaissance. This 19th century reconstruction of a 15th century painting shows Florence, Italy, in 1490.

The Italian Renaissance Analyze Charts Read the chart comparing medieval and Renaissance Europe. How were the achievements of individuals judged in the different eras? The Renaissance Begins in Italy Analyze Maps The states and kingdoms of Italy lay at the center of Europes sea trade. Why were so many banking centers located in Italy? The Renaissance Begins in Italy

Italys History and Geography Italys historical artifacts was a constant reminder of the past

Italian cities thrived during the Middle Ages, ports did as well Wealthy and powerful merchants promoted the Ren. They supported the arts Florence and the Medicis Florence was a wealthy Italian city state that produced a number of poets, architects, artists, scholars, and scientists. 1400s the Medicis organized a banking business. They became successful and in 1434 gained control of the city Lorenzo The Magnificent Medici was the Ren ideal. He was a clever politician, helping Florence through difficult times and was a generous patron of the arts

The Renaissance Begins in Italy Analyze Information This painting from the 1400s depicts a typical scene in an Italian banking house. How is the wealth of the banker shown in this image? The Renaissance Begins in Italy Analyze Charts Review the chart about the Medici family in Renaissance Italy. During Lorenzos rule of Florence, in which years did he probably have more money to spend on the arts?

Art Flourishes in the Renaissance Art Reflects New Ideas and Attitudes Ren artists drew religious figures, well known figures of the day, scenes from Greek and Roman mythology, and depicted historical events

Donatello creates the first life-style statue of a soldier on horseback since ancient times. New Techniques and Styles Ren artists return back to Roman realist art when they draw They discover perspective allowing them to show 3D on 2D surfaces They also study anatomy and drew live models making their art appear more lifelike Art Flourishes in the Renaissance

Renaissance Architecture Rejected Gothic architecture, instead went back to columns, arches, and domes from the Ancient Greeks Brunelleschi created a dome for his cathedral, using his talents as an engineer to create the equipment needed to make it

Leonardo da Vinci Born in 1452, considered the most brilliant artist of the age His masterpieces include the Mona Lisa and the Last Supper Even though he was an artists, his interests ran into botany, anatomy, optics, music, architecture, and engineering. He sketched flying machines and undersea boats centuries before the first planes and submarines Art Flourishes in the Renaissance

Michelangelo Born in 1475, he was a sculptor, engineer, painter, architect, and poet. He creates the statue of David which was very similar to Greek

sculptors In 1508 he starts to paint on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. It takes 4 years He designs the dome in St. Peters Cathedral in Rome Raphael Younger than Leonardo and Michelangelo he studies the work of those great artists His art blends Christian and Classical styles His painting School of Athens had many famous ancient scholars and a few Ren ones

Art Flourishes in the Renaissance In this painting by Italian Renaissance artist Tintoretto, Mary Magdalene anoints the feet of Jesus. Classical columns in the background reflect the Renaissance style. New Books Reflect Renaissance Themes

Castigliones Ideal Courtier Baldassare Castiglione wrote The Ideal Courtier to show the manners, skills, learning, and virtues a courtier should know Machiavellis Advice to Princes Niccolo Machiavelli was a diplomat who observed many kings and princes in foreign courts and studied Ancient Rome In 1513 he writes The Prince as a guide for rulers to gain and maintain power He stressed that the ends justified the means, urging rulers to do

whatever necessary to achieve their goals Critics attacked his advice (Machiavellian refers to lying in politics) His work continues to spark debate because it raises important ethical questions about government and the use of power New Books Reflect Renaissance Themes This 1474 painting by Italian Renaissance artist Andrea Mantegna is called The Court of Mantua. An Italian nobleman was Mantegnas patron and commissioned art works like this.

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