Learning to Read in a Balanced Literacy Environment

Learning to Read in a Balanced Literacy Environment

Learning to Read in a Balanced Literacy Environment Beginning Readers August 27, 2013 Presenters from Nanaimo Ladysmith Public Schools Linda Baldwin Carole Hutchinson Shona Sneddon Balanced Literacy Definition

The aim of balanced literacy is to encourage the development of skills in Speaking Writing Reading Listening Representing Viewing speaking and listening (oral language), reading and viewing, writing and representing to make meaning of the world and to prepare our students to be engaged,

reflective lifelong learners. Balanced Literacy Definition Speaking Writing Reading Listening Representing Viewing Our balanced literacy approach recognizes that learners need to use a variety of strategies and authentic tasks

to become efficient readers, writers and communicators through a variety of literature and media. As practitioners, we continually utilize ongoing assessment to inform our practice and to be responsive to student needs. Balanced Literacy Definition Within balanced literacy, the gradual release of responsibility Speaking Writing

Reading Listening Representing Viewing (I do/We do/You do) is used to empower students to apply strategies and skills to new learning opportunities. COMPONENTS OF BALANCED LITERACY - GRADUAL RELEASE OF RESPONSIBILITY MOST SUPPORT Modeled Reading

Teacher reads a selection aloud to students Modeled Writing Teacher writes in front of students Shared (Interactive) Reading Teacher and students read text together Shared (Interactive) Writing Teacher and students both act as scribes to plan and create text Guided Reading Teacher supports students as they apply reading

strategies and skills to read text at students instructional level Guided Writing Teacher supports students as they apply writing strategies and skills to write text at students instructional level Independent Reading Students choose and read self-selected texts independently Independent Writing Students write text independently

LEAST SUPPORT Principles of Learning Learning requires the active participation of the student People learn in a variety of ways and at different rates Learning is both an individual and a group process Activity What are classroom activities or

instructional practices that would support each of these elements of reading? Add to your handout, and write on post-it notes throughout to share at the end Current research in literacy instruction suggests that successful literacy programs include

10 Essential Characteristics (BC Ministry of Education IRP) Ten Essential Characteristics of a Successful Literacy Program Literacy learning in Kindergarten is critical to later success A comprehensive and co-ordinated literacy program is crucial. Ten Essential Characteristics of a Successful Literacy Program

Professional learning communities support a comprehensive and co-ordinated literacy program. An extended and uninterrupted block of time for literacy learning is essential. Ten Essential Characteristics of a Successful Literacy Program Literacy experiences must strongly support student engagement. Ongoing assessments are used to drive

instruction and support learning. Ten Essential Characteristics of a Successful Literacy Program Focussed teaching is essential. A resource-rich environment makes a big difference. Ten Essential Characteristics of a Successful Literacy Program Struggling and/or reluctant literacy learners

benefit from research-based interventions Ten Essential Characteristics of a Successful Literacy Program Successful family-school partnerships improve student literacy learning Five Elements of Reading Phonological Awareness Vocabulary

Independent Reader Comprehension Decoding and Word Recognition Fluency Five Elements of Reading Phonological awareness: is auditory and is the ability to recognize, combine and

manipulate basic sound units of the spoken word there is no evidence that phonological awareness is taught in a specific order, however, below is a progression of elements which range from the easiest to the most difficult it is the foundation upon which reading is taught and can be integrated into every component of the primary literacy program Five Elements of Reading Decoding and word recognition: the ability to accurately sound out words and is fostered through explicit and systematic phonics instruction phonics teaches the principles of letter-sound relationships, including letter patterns and how to correctly pronounce words

Five Elements of Reading understanding the letter sound relationship enables the reader to more efficiently figure out words they havent seen before. although models may vary slightly, elements to teach phonics are systematic Five Elements of Reading There are four main approaches to phonics instruction: A. Synthetic approaches that start by teaching the individual sounds and then how to blend them into words B. Analytic approaches that teach the whole word first, then the component sounds within the word are analyzed C. Analogic approaches teach students to apply word parts they

know to identify and write new words D. Phonics through spelling which is an approach that introduces letters, sounds and patterns with immediate links to writing Five Elements of Reading Fluency: the ability to read smoothly and accurately with appropriate expression and intonation if able to successfully decode, fluent readers can concentrate on making connections and develop a deeper understanding of what they are reading

Five Elements of Reading Vocabulary: a readers vocabulary can be developed in the classroom by using open ended questions and wherever possible paraphrasing their responses with a richer vocabulary there is a direct correlation between having a strong vocabulary base and having greater success in learning to read Five Elements of Reading Comprehension: is the active, fluent construction and revision of the meaning of text

when constructing meaning students engage in three different levels of thinking: literal, inferential and critical Learning Routines Why do we need to organize and teach the learning routines? -learning routines are habits of the mind that are selfdirected and self-monitored (Rog, 2013 Read, Write, Play, Learn)

-whichever structure you use it is important to model, demonstrate and practice what you want your students to be able to do (Gradual Release of Responsibility, Pearson & Gallagher 1983) The Daily 5 and The Cafe Daily 5 (Boushey & Moser, 2005) Building Muscle Memory The Daily 5 and The Cafe The Four Blocks

The Teachers Guide to the Four Blocks (Cunningham, Hall & Sigmon, 1999) Framework Represents four different approaches to teaching children to read Daily incorporating the different approaches Uses a variety of formats to make each block as multilevel as possible Learning Routines How do effective learning routines look in the context of a balanced literacy classroom?

Program Fits in the Working with Words section of a balanced literacy program and covers the phonological awareness, decoding and word recognition elements Review sounds Big Book Student sound book Practice sheet Word cards for blending Word games and segmenting Tricky words PWIM : Picture Word Inductive Model (Calhoun, 1998)

Program uses pictures containing familiar objects, action and scenes to draw out words from childrens listening and speaking vocabulary the purpose of PWIM is to develop the students vocabulary, concepts about words, sentence and paragraph structures the strategy can be used whole class, small groups, pairs or individuals Fits within the guided reading and writing sections of a balanced literacy program and covers the vocabulary and comprehension elements Program

Fits within the Working with Words part of a balanced literacy program and covers the phonological awareness element Assessment Primary purpose to guide instruction and meet needs of students Of learning confirm what students know: summative, marks For learning modify teaching or activities: formative, descriptive As learning role of the student: personal reflection Assessment

Screening brief test to asses an individual in order to identify a need for help or intervention Universal or district screening may indicate areas of curriculum that need supplemental support or identifies what students are at risk and may need additional diagnostic assessment Progress monitoring repeated assessment of target skills to see progress toward essential learning outcomes and to determine the effectiveness of an intervention Diagnostic assessments individually administered to discover specific areas of skills deficits and provide baseline data

Assessment Critical that students be assessed upon entering school and continue to be frequently assessed in the early years as they begin to read Initial assessment provides a baseline Informal throughout the year allows the teacher to address students individual needs and give extra assistance or change instruction Imbed in instruction when possible Examples include: anecdotal records, conferences, checklists, rubrics, products, response groups, learning logs, interviews Activity Completion

Put your post-it note activities on the appropriate chart paper Participant Activities for the 5 elements of reading Phonological Awareness Rubber band words Segmenting Decoding and Word Recognition Lexia

sticker scenes word searches Word sorts McCracken Explode the Code Primary Phonics Zoo Phonics Sort pictures by sounds initial, vowel, endings playing with sounds in words using blocks Games

flip books Bingo memory games with sight words Writing word within a word Primary Success Dolch words McCracken Explode the Code Primary Phonics rhyming

student created word games Lexia fill in the blank sentences Crosswords "does that look right? lots of easy reading books spelling Vocabulary

Lexia word searches Fluency short "fold and say" stories picture induction write out shared, choral reading with poetry or chants

pre-discuss daily practice word wall read aloud, read along Paraphrase stories with good vocabulary Dictionary practice

research projects use different voices partner reading repeated reading sing and definition spell aloud small group learning and discussion

1,2,3 Spell Apps model Comprehension literacy circles shared reading check for understanding reading power strategies re-tell - summarize story story elements word toss

open discussion write, read, write book reports literal, inferential, critical, evaluating Websites Foundations for literacy http:// foundationsforliteracy.cllrnet.ca/index.php/Foundation s_For_Literacy Jolly Phonics http://www.jollylearning.co.uk/ Summer Institute http://successforallsummerinstitute.weebly.com

Thank you for attending this workshop. Enjoy the last few days of summer!

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