TOP TEN ANXIETIES 1. Sounding sophisticated and still

TOP TEN ANXIETIES 1. Sounding sophisticated and still

TOP TEN ANXIETIES 1. Sounding sophisticated and still answering the question 2. Remembering Quotes 3. Wider/multiple interpretations 4. Linking back to the question 5. Concise arguments 6. How to use gothic concepts and why they are relevant 7. Do I know my Genre? 8. Should I use a critic and if so how? 9. Context of the texts how do I use this information? 10. We have forgotten how to AO2 Understanding The Genre Making intertextual links Dracula Control of Female roles in society Lady Macbeth counters this. Setting and entrapment (Locked doors The Bloody Chamber and Lady of the house. Upper class Males having more power/getting away with brutality

The Marquis (Countered by the classless Heathcliff) and Macbeth. Blood and sexual desire The Bloody Chamber, Snow Child, Lady of the house of love, Macbeth. Dorian Gray Fall from Grace Macbeth and Heathcliff downfall. Guilt and Sin recorded on the Canvas Lady Macbeth Out damn spot Symbol of the dagger Macbeth murder weapon. Image and vanity Cathy changing depending on her social surroundings. Jekyll and Hyde Transformation of Jekyll Metamorphoses in the Bloody Chamber Wolf-Alice, Tigers bride etc. Emotional transformation Macbeth/Lady Macbeth, Cathy. Becoming capable of violence Macbeth + Heathcliff Duality Macbeth, Lady Macbeth Famous Gothic Novels

Read through the synopsis and extracts. 1. Identify Gothic features. 2. Identify links/connections to our Gothic texts. 3. Highlight quotes/references from the extract that you could of used in the mock. TOP TEN ANXIETIES 1. Sounding sophisticated and still answering the question 2. Remembering Quotes 3. Wider/multiple interpretations 4. Linking back to the question 5. Concise arguments 6. How to use gothic concepts and why they are relevant 7. Do I know my Genre? 8. Should I use a critic and if so how? 9. Context of the texts how do I use this information? 10. We have forgotten how to AO2

Multiple interpretations Exploring different perspectives 3. Wider/multiple interpretations Review these common interpretations of key ideas in Macbeth. Offer an alternative interpretation with textual support. Consider Marxist or Feminist if relevant. Character: The Witches. For most of Shakespeare's contemporary audience, Macbeth would appear to be at the mercy of the witches and therefore not entirely responsible for his actions. Character: Three characters in one: Macbeth, Lady Macbeth and the three witches can be seen as one person. Lady Macbeth and the witches are the inner voices of Macbeth and they guide him and force him to do the terrible actions. They are a symbol of his divided consciousness. Concepts: A play of political and social realism: This focus will be on the oppressive hierarchical society and how it produces corrupt individuals. Macbeth is one of these corrupt individuals of high birth. In the beginning, when Macbeth is

thane of Glamis, he already is in the top of the hierarchy, but because of the lust for a greater power he gets corrupt and murders the king. Review these common interpretations of key ideas in Macbeth. Offer as many alternative interpretations as possible. Please use textual support. Consider Marxist or Feminist if relevant. Character: The Witches. For most of Shakespeare's contemporary audience, Macbeth would appear to be at the mercy of the witches and therefore not entirely responsible for his actions. Character: Three characters in one: Macbeth, Lady Macbeth and the three witches can be seen as one person. Lady Macbeth and the witches are the inner voices of Macbeth and they guide him and force him to do the terrible actions. They are a symbol of his divided consciousness. Concepts: A play of political and social realism: This focus will be on the oppressive hierarchical society and how it produces corrupt individuals. Macbeth is one of these corrupt individuals of high birth. In the beginning, when Macbeth is thane of Glamis, he already is in the top of the hierarchy, but because of the lust for a greater power he gets corrupt and murders the king.

A Freudian interpretation of Wuthering Heights 1. Find evidence to support the interpretation. 2. Evaluate the value of the interpretation. 3. Offer an alternative interpretation She sees in the symbiosis of Catherine, Heathcliff, and Edgar the relationship of Freud's id, ego, and superego. At a psychological level, they merge into one personality with Heathcliff's image of the three of them buried (the unconscious) in what is essentially one coffin. Heathcliff, the id, expresses the most primitive drives (like sex), seeks pleasure, and avoids pain; the id is not affected by time and remains in the unconscious (appropriately, Heathcliff's origins are unknown, he is dark, he runs wild and is primitive as a child, and his three year absence remains a mystery). Catherine, the ego, relates to other people and society, tests the impulses of the id against reality, and controls the energetic id until there is a reasonable chance of its urges being fulfilled. Edgar, the superego, represents the rules of proper behaviour and morality inculcated by teachers, family, and society; he is civilized and cultured. As conscience, he compels Catherine to choose between Heathcliff and himself. TOP TEN ANXIETIES 1. Sounding sophisticated and still answering the question

2. Remembering Quotes 3. Wider/multiple interpretations 4. Linking back to the question 5. Concise arguments 6. How to use gothic concepts and why they are relevant 7. Do I know my Genre? 8. Should I use a critic and if so how? 9. Context of the texts how do I use this information? 10. We have forgotten how to AO2 Gothic Concepts Identifying and explaining the relevance Identifying Gothic concepts and explaining the relevance Macbeth Timeline: Act 1 Supernatural: It is used to shock/scare the audience and to introduce the key themes

of fate and desire within the play. Scene 1: Witches meet and plan when to meet Macbeth Scene 2: Duncan waits with his men to hear the outcome of the battles. Macbeth is praised for his bravery, the title of Thane of Cawdor is to be given to Macbeth Scene 3: Macbeth and Banquo meet Scene 4: Macbeth meets Duncan the witches. They make prophesies Duncan states that he will to Macbeths for both men, Macbeth will be king home. Duncan names Malcolm, his son, while Banquos sons will be kings as Prince of Cumberland. Macbeth states:

the witches disappear that is a step, On which I must fall down Scene 5: Lady Macbeth reads a letter sent by Macbeth telling her of the witches prophesies. she fears he is too full of kindness to act to take the throne by force. She calls on powers of evil to make her evil and masculine so she has no compassion. She advises Macbeth on how to behave in front of the guests Scene 6: Duncan arrives at the castle and remarks how pleasant it is. He is greeted by Lady Macbeth

Scene 7: Macbeth has doubts about killing Duncan. He wonders where it will lead. Will murder cause further murders? Lady Macbeth attacks her husbands masculinity and claims he is a coward. Macbeth decides to do it but fears they will be discovered but Lady Mac. reassures him and he states a woman should only have sons. Identifying Gothic concepts and explaining the relevance Macbeth Timeline: Act 1 Scene 1: Witches meet and plan when to meet Macbeth Scene 2: Duncan waits with his men to hear the outcome

of the battles. Macbeth is praised for his bravery, the title of Thane of Cawdor is to be given to Macbeth Scene 3: Macbeth and Banquo meet Scene 4: Macbeth meets Duncan the witches. They make prophesies Duncan states that he will to Macbeths for both men, Macbeth will be king home. Duncan names Malcolm, his son, while Banquos sons will be kings as Prince of Cumberland. Macbeth states: the witches disappear that is a step, On which I must fall down Scene 5: Lady Macbeth reads a letter sent by Macbeth telling her of the witches prophesies. she fears he is too full of

kindness to act to take the throne by force. She calls on powers of evil to make her evil and masculine so she has no compassion. She advises Macbeth on how to behave in front of the guests Scene 6: Duncan arrives at the castle and remarks how pleasant it is. He is greeted by Lady Macbeth Scene 7: Macbeth has doubts about killing Duncan. He wonders where it will lead. Will murder cause further murders? Lady Macbeth attacks her husbands masculinity and claims he is a coward. Macbeth decides to do it but fears they will be discovered but Lady Mac. reassures him and he

states a woman should only have sons. Act 2: Scene 1: Banquo and Fleance are preparing for bed when Macbeth appears.Banquo speaks of the Kings gifts to Lady Macbeth. He also tells Macbeth he has been dreaming about the three witches. Macbeth lies saying he has not. Banquo goes to bed. Macbeth suddenly sees a dagger appear infront of him. He does not know if it is real or an illusion, he follows it to Duncans room at the chimes of the bell from Lady Macbeth. Scene 4: ross talks to Macduff and an old man. Duncans sons have run away to England and Ireland

which makes them look guilty. Macduff is not going to watch Macbeth be crowned instead he will go home. He wishes Ross good fortune. Scene 2: Lady Mac. is waiting to see if he has killed Duncan. He appears with the daggers which Lady Macbeth takes back to paint the faces of the guards in order to implicate them. Macbeth is troubled by what he has done. He talks of sleep being murdered, a knocking comes. Macbeth is strained mentally by such noise. Lady Mac. takes him to get him into his nightgown to avoid suspicion. Scene 3: A porter opens the door for Macduff. and Lennox. They have been ordered to wake

the king to help prepare his departure from the castle. The porter talks of alcohol and how it creates urges for sex but stops you from being able to function sexually. There have been strange signs in the weather which bode danger. and tragedy. Macbeth meets them, Macduff. discovers the king. Macbeth pretends to be alarmed and kills the guards. Both sons of Duncan decide to leave. Act 3 Scene 1: Banquo thinks about what has taken place - thou hast it now, king, Cawdor, glams He does not know how he got it but he fears mischief . There is a feast that night and Macbeth invites Banquo, he will come but is riding first He wishes him a good ride and promises to discuss things with him in much more depth later.

Macbeth then on his own considers his position the witches promised Banquo that his sons would be king. Macbeth feels he is nothing and is unsafe in his position. He decides to act and stop fate from making Banquo king. He speaks to murderers and plans Banquos murder. Scene 2: Lady Mac. goes to see her husband. She asks him why he is alone and is not happy. Macbeth exclaims we have scotched the snake but they are still in danger as long as Banquo lives. He says he will have no rest. Lady Mac. rebukes him and tells him to be happy and joyful for for his guests. He confesses to plans to kill Banquo

he refuses to tell his wife what will happen Scene 5: the three witches are together Scene 6:Lennox and a lord discuss speaking to goddess Hecate. She is the state of affairs, Macbeths angry that they have set Macbeth in kingdom. Malcolm has gone to ask motion. She tells them he will come the king of England for help in to know his fate tomorrow. She will ridding him of Macbeth. have no part in this. Scene 3: The murderers wait to Scene 4: Macbeth is in the Banquet hall. kill Banquo, a third one has He fakes sadness at Banquos absence. joined them under Macbeths. He is joyful and merry. He raises a drink orders. Banquo approaches,

in honour of his friend. they attack, Fleance escapes. He is asked to sit down with some men The table is full according to Macbeth everyone else thinks it is empty. The person in the chair turns around it is Banquo. He is disturbed and Lady Mac. explains it is a childhood illness. the ghost appears and disappears at intervals. Macbeth states that blood will have blood He believes he is being punished for his wickedness. He decides to visit the witches again. Act 4 Scene 1: Macbeth goes to see the witches. He asks to know from their masters several things. He sees three visions, the spirit knows his thoughts

He should beware Macduff Macbeth must be brave and vicious no man born of woman can kill him. He will be safe till Great Burnam Wood to High Dunsinane moves towards him. He decides to kill Macduff. He sees a man looking like Banquo wearing a crown which is so bright hurts his eyes. He sees Banquos descendants going on forever. He wakes and is told Macduff has run to England. Scene 2: Lady Macduff and her Scene 3:Macduff is meeting Malcolm family are killed. She was neither of them trusts the other. questioning her husbands They talk about Edward the Confessor

motives to leave for England the English king who can heal the sick before the murderers arrive and Malcolm apologises for his mistrust towards slaughter all her children, servants Macduff. Ross arrives and speaks of the deaths and herself. of his family. Macduff promises to kill Macbeth. Act 5 Scene 1: A Doctor and Lady Macbeths servant Scene 2: Malcolms armies meet. Macbeth Scene 3:Macbeth asks the Doctor about his are watching her. Lady Macbeth has been sleep has been preparing for battle. wife. she is suffering from the unnatural. walking. She complains of seeing a spot of blood They will meet all the rest of the army at Macbeth fears not the approaching army. on her hands. she is haunted by memories of Birnam Wood

He repeats the prophecy of Birnam Wood. Duncans death and the deaths of Lady Macduff The Doctor decides to leave soon. and her children. The Doctor concludes that it is a sign of her guilt that it regret comes to light during sleep. Scene 4: Malcolm and his armies arrive they Scene 5: Macbeth commands to hang out Scene 6:Malcolm commands his army now that cut down the trees of Birnam Wood to move the banners showing eh is there. A woman they are close to throw down their disguise and in camouflage. screams. It is Lady Macbeth, she is dead. attack. He concludes it would have been better if she dies after this period. A servants tells him of the approach of Birnam Wood. Scene 7: Macbeth is stuck in his fate and decides to fight to the death. He fights Young Siward and kills him, declaring he as born of woman. Macduff hears the noise and approaches.

Scene 8: Macbeth and MAcduff fight. Macbeth learns the truth about Macduff he will not surrender and kill himself like a Roman soldier. He is beaten and all rejoice. Another consideration that is opposed to the original statement has to be the idea that the innocent people of Scotland suffer under Macbeths rule. Macbeth shows no guilt despite his politics and tyranny being wholly repressive and negative on his subjects, bleed, bleed, poor country. By personifying the poor country Shakespeare is emphasising the human suffering that goes with fallible politics. Macbeths desire to make Scotland bleed emphasises his remorseless soul and the gothic motif here is used to portray a slow, painful suffering of the country rather than the more horrific and kitsch use of blood in texts like Dracula and The Bloody chamber. This political argument is valuable and valid because it emphasises Shakespeares social awareness and critique; how dependent a society is on a rational leader. This is perhaps also a knowing wink towards James I and Shakespeares attempt to appease his king. The denouement of the

play supports this idea with the noble, rational Malcolm promising grace and labelling Macbeth as a butcher who will no longer cause Scotland to suffer. The Final Countdown March 10th 22nd Easter April 11th to May 27th Half term June 6th 17th Exam Friday 17th June 9am

Bloody Chamber Lady of the house + Wolf stories + Puss in boots Section B 3 texts Memory activities core quotes group analysis (board) AO2 refresh Add critical references couple with quotes Disgusting, no choice section A/B Essay structure checklist Writers intentions context (Angela Carter context) linking into response Vocab sophistication How to discuss value of ideas Devices Language, form and structure - Practical tasks - More exam focus

- More detailed feedback AO2 Starter The mass of lilies that surrounded me exhaled, now, the odour of their withering. They looked like the trumpets of the angels of death. Pg 37 Language/structural features Surface level Deeper meaning Multiple interpretations Gothic features Section B 1. To explore all three texts for quality quotes. 2. To understand the concepts, criteria and structure of section B 3. To analyse the type of questions given. Question Macbeth

Wuthering Heights The Bloody Chamber SWAP Do any of their quotes fit your original question? (steal) Do any of your quotes fit the question? (share) Add one quote per text (help) Gothic writing is exciting because it allows us to think the unthinkable. How far do you agree with this view? Tess and Holly To what extent do you think gothic writing is a disturbing exploration of the unknown? Olivia and Emily To what extent do you agree with the view that gothic writing shows that human beings are naturally inclined to be evil rather than good? Alicia and Abbie To what extent do you agree that, in gothic writing, fear and pain are sources of pleasure?

Lauren and Katie Mad, bad and dangerous. How accurate is this as a description of the gothic villains in the texts you have studied? - Eloise and Lana How do you respond to the view that gothic writing explores potential threats to normal values? Frankie and Liv In gothic writing, the presentation of places is often more interesting than the presentation of characters. How far do you agree with this view? Laura, Emily and Frankie Consider the significance of forms of entrapment in gothic literature. Miles and Andrea Gothic writing is exciting because it allows us to think the unthinkable. How far do you agree with this view? Olivia and Emily

SWAP To what extent do you think gothic writing is a disturbing exploration of the unknown? Holly and Tess To what extent do you agree with the view that gothic writing shows that human beings are naturally inclined to be evil rather than good? Frankie and Liv To what extent do you agree that, in gothic writing, fear and pain are sources of pleasure? Miles and Andrea Mad, bad and dangerous. How accurate is this as a description of the gothic villains in the texts you have studied? Frankie, Emily and Laura How do you respond to the view that gothic writing explores potential threats to normal values? Alicia and Abbie In gothic writing, the presentation of places is often more interesting than the presentation of characters. How far do you agree with this view? Eloise and Lana

Gothic writing is exciting because it allows us to think the unthinkable. How far do you agree with this view? Frankie, Emily and Laura SWAP To what extent do you think gothic writing is a disturbing exploration of the unknown? Alicia and Abbie To what extent do you agree with the view that gothic writing shows that human beings are naturally inclined to be evil rather than good? Miles and Andrea To what extent do you agree that, in gothic writing, fear and pain are sources of pleasure? Frankie and Liv Mad, bad and dangerous. How accurate is this as a description of the gothic villains in the texts you have studied? Olivia and Emily How do you respond to the view that gothic writing explores potential threats to normal values? Holly and Tess

In gothic writing, the presentation of places is often more interesting than the presentation of characters. How far do you agree with this view? Katie and Lauren Consider the significance of forms of entrapment in gothic literature. Lana and Eloise ELEMENTS OF THE GOTHIC The question generally follows this pattern (Not always in this order) What would you pick? EITHER Conceptual Question 19 1 9 Gothic writing warns of the dangers of aspiring beyond our limitations. How far does your reading of gothic writing support this view? (40 marks) OR Question 20 2 0 To what extent do you agree that obsession is a significant element in the gothic writing

you have studied? (40 marks) Theme OR Question 21 2 1 How do you respond to the idea that gothic villains make evil seem attractive? (40 marks) Character Breaking down the question/Writing an Intro How do you respond to the idea that gothic villains make evil seem attractive? 1. What is the purpose of a villain and why are villains important in the gothic? 2. Identify some famous gothic villains. 3. Define your villains from your texts what makes them villains? 4. What makes these villains attractive? 5. What makes these villains unattractive (evil)? 6. Establish your viewpoint

Antagonists play a crucial role in establishing reader interest and adding jeopardy to a plot. They play a particularly pertinent role in gothic literature, which lends itself more to dark, troubling content and moral arguments about good versus evil. Also in gothic literature the antagonist is often most remembered, from the brooding and mysterious Dracula to the tortured and destructive monster in Frankenstein, villains tend to drive the narrative more in a gothic story. This is certainly true in Macbeth with the aforementioned lead, Heathcliff in Wuthering heights and the Marquis and the Erl-King in The Bloody chamber collection. These villains have different appeals, from the sexualised and ominous Heathcliff to the vulnerable and unhinged Macbeth. Even the Marquis and The Erl king have an attractive mystery to them. However these characters also reflect evil ideals, from murder to mutilation, betrayal to butchery, these villains possess the ability to repulse the audience just as much as they entice. How do you respond to the idea that gothic villains make evil seem attractive? 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. What is the purpose of a villain and why are villains important in the gothic? Identify some famous gothic villains. Define your villains from your texts what makes them villains? What makes these villains attractive? What makes these villains unattractive (evil)? Establish your viewpoint Antagonists play a crucial role in establishing reader interest and adding jeopardy to a plot. They play a particularly pertinent role in gothic literature, which lends itself more to dark, troubling content and moral arguments about good versus evil. Also in gothic literature the antagonist is often most remembered, from the brooding and mysterious Dracula to the tortured and destructive monster in Frankenstein, villains tend to drive the narrative more in a gothic story. This is certainly true in Macbeth with the aforementioned lead, Heathcliff in Wuthering heights and the Marquis and the Erl-King in The Bloody chamber collection. These villains have different appeals, from the sexualised and ominous Heathcliff to the vulnerable and unhinged Macbeth. Even the Marquis and The Erl king have an attractive mystery to them. However these

characters also reflect evil ideals, from murder to mutilation, betrayal to butchery, these villains possess the ability to repulse the audience just as much as they entice. Breaking down the question/Writing an Intro How do you respond to the idea that gothic villains make evil seem attractive? 1. What is the key term and how does it relate to the gothic 2. Identify some famous gothic examples. 3. Define your examples from your texts what makes them relatable to the key term? 4. Establish the conflict/argument in the question. 5. Offer examples for both sides of the argument. 6. Establish your viewpoint Planning a response Macbeth Wuthering Heights

Arguments Quotes Multiple interpretations Gothic features Connections The Bloody Chamber Examiners feedback Section B and critical links The best answers in Section B were those where students dealt with each of the three texts in turn and not those which dodged backwards and forwards from one text to another. Tackling each text in turn allowed students to deal with each one substantially. There were some answers where the writing on the third text was very brief or sketchy. Such responses could not be described as substantial and they lost marks accordingly. Time management is an important skill for students to practise. Many students have now grasped the specifications philosophy regarding AO4 and AO3 and used helpful, integrated context and critical opinions which arose from studying the texts. However, there were still some examples where context was unproductively bolted on to the answer and not at all relevant. This very commonly arose with regards to James 1s views on

witchcraft, supposedly in relation to Macbeth, and Mary Shelleys biographical details which many candidates tried to make relevant to Frankenstein with minimal success. In a similar way, critical opinions quoted should be relevant to the task. There is no virtue in showing off learnt critical opinions if they do not add anything to the argument. Marxist and feminist perspectives are welcomed if relevant but they sometimes diverted or distorted the responses to the tasks . Band 5 (27-33 marks) AO1 use of appropriate critical vocabulary and well structured argument expressed accurately AO1 relevant with sharp focus on task/ detailed knowledge and understanding of texts AO2 exploration of several features of form and structure with evaluation of how they shape meanings AO2 exploration of several aspects of language with evaluation of how they shape meanings AO3 detailed and evaluative discussion of connections between texts through concept of gothic/pastoral AO3 clear consideration of different interpretations of texts with evaluation of their strengths and weaknesses and with significant supportive references AO4 detailed exploration of ways of contextualising gothic/pastoral AO4 detailed exploration of a range of other contextual factors with specific, detailed links between context/texts/task Band 6 (34-40 marks)

AO1 use of appropriate critical vocabulary and technically fluent style/ well structured and coherent argument AO1 always relevant with very sharp focus on task and confidently ranging around texts AO2 exploration and analysis of key features of form and structure with perceptive evaluation of how they shape meanings AO2 exploration and analysis of key aspects of form and structure with perceptive evaluation of how they shape meanings AO3 detailed and perceptive understanding of issues raised in connecting texts through concept of gothic/pastoral AO3 perceptive consideration of different interpretations of texts with sharp evaluation of their strengths and weaknesses and with excellent selection of supportive references AO4 excellent understanding of ways of contextualising gothic/pastoral AO4 excellent understanding of a Critical Perspective The supernatural elements found in both Wuthering Heights and Macbeth function metaphorically to address the complexity of human desire for divine intervention. - Hewitt Deconstruct the argument What evidence supports it?

What is an alternative view? Context and Quotes 1. To explore all three texts for quality quotes. 2. To understand the concepts, criteria and structure of section B 3. To analyse the type of questions given. Kahoot The Final Countdown March 10th 22nd Easter April 11th to May 27th Half term June 6th 17th

Exam Friday 17th June 9am Bloody Chamber Lady of the house + Wolf stories + Puss in boots Section B 3 texts Memory activities core quotes group analysis (board) AO2 refresh Add critical references couple with quotes Disgusting, no choice section A/B Essay structure checklist Writers intentions context (Angela Carter context) linking into response Vocab sophistication How to discuss value of ideas

Devices Language, form and structure - Practical tasks - More exam focus - More detailed feedback Examining Carter 1. How can the Bloody Chamber be linked to Medieval literature? 2. What are the main plot points of The Magic Toyshop and how can it be linked to The Bloody Chamber? 3. How might her divorce have influenced The bloody chamber? 4. What historical events took place between 1977-1981 and how could any of them link to The Bloody Chamber? 5. What is Postmodernism and how does it relate to The Bloody Chamber? 6. What is a magical realist? 7. How is Salman Rushdies work similar to The Bloody Chamber? 8. Carter's work embraces anarchy and champions the weak and disadvantaged. Do you agree with this statement? EXT: What quotes from the collection are useful when it comes to contextual links? 1. The sleeping and the dead are but as

pictures. Tis the eye of childhood that fears a painted devil. 1. What Language and Literary devices are present in these quotes? 2. What gothic features do they link to? 2. "What hands are here? ha! they pluck out mine eyes. Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand? 3. "Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player That struts and frets his hour upon the stage." 4. "So foul and fair a day I have not seen." 5. "I think our country sinks beneath the yoke;

It weeps, it bleeds. The Value of interpretations What role do the Witches play in Macbeth? The witches represent Macbeth's evil side. The witches in Macbeth serve to advance the story and reveal human weakness. The witches role is to control Macbeth through equivocation. The witches are used to create fear and chaos within the play and the audience The witches represent the struggle between the supernatural and natural world. The witches arent real. They are a figment of Macbeths imagination and represent his descent into madness. Write out each interpretation in order of which has the most value. (Warning: They

all have value so this will require you to have an opinion!) Underneath each interpretation write down the strengths and weaknesses of the interpretation. Explain its value. Did I miss any interpretations? The Erl King What do you remember 1. 2. 3. 4.

What is The Green Man motif? Why does Carter change the narrative perspective and tense so regularly? What obvious literary allusion is made? Mother, Mother, you have murdered me! What does this quote mean? Extended Metaphor and Symbolism Caged Birds The Woods The Erl-King Section A - Exam In the stories in The Bloody Chamber Carter is over critical in her presentation of Men? How far do you agree with this view?

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