Teacher Edition Book 1 Table of Contents Pacing

Teacher Edition Book 1 Table of Contents Pacing

Teacher Edition Book 1 Table of Contents Pacing Calendar.. LT.1611 LT.1611 LT.1611 LY.1704 LA.150 7 LY.1698 LT.1611 LA.150 5 LY.1705 LY.1705 LA.150 4 LT.1610 LY.1701 LA.150 8 Australian Curriculum English Year 5, Book 1 LT.1610 i Use Compound Sentences... 1 10 22 33 Identify Complex Sentences. 46 Explain How Idioms Convey Ideas and Opinions Use Figurative Language... 55 65 Recognise Different Ways to Start Sentences. 78 Identify and Interpret Similes. Identify and Interpret Metaphors Identify and Interpret Personification. 95 10 Revise Text.. 9 12 Recognise the Attributes of a Narrative... 1 13 Identify the Narrator 4 14 Identify the Language Features of Imaginative Text 7 15 Add Descriptions to Writing.. 8 17

Explain How Points of View Affect the Story2014 All rights reserved. Edit Text... Sentences & Figurative Language Day 1 Opening Classroom Norms (PBIS) Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Consonant Clusters Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Consonant Clusters Spelling Activity Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Consonant Clusters NAPLAN Editing p. 7 p. 8 5 minutes Spelling & Spelling Workbook: Grammar Review of Year 4 15 minutes Consonant Clusters Pretest pp. 3-4 Picture Dictionary: identify, interpret, literal Spell Incorrect Words 5 Times pp. 5-6 Day 5 Review Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Consonant Clusters Posttest pp. 9-10 Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1694 Write compound sentences. Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1694 Write

compound sentences. p. 4 pp. 2-3 Reading Fluency ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of 30 minutes Lessons 100 minutes your choosing. ACELT1611 Identify and interpret similes. p. 1 your choosing. ACELT1611 Identify and interpret metaphors. your choosing. ACELT1611 Identify and interpret metaphors. (continued) p. 10 p. 10 ACELT1611 Identify and interpret similes. [email protected] p. 22 ACELT1611Identify and interpret metaphors. p. 7 Year 5 your choosing. ACELT1611 Identify and interpret personification. p. 18 i 2014 All rights reserved. Sentences & Figurative Language Day 6 Opening Classroom Norms (PBIS) Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS)

Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Diphthongs Spell Incorrect Words 5 Times Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Diphthongs Spelling Activity Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Diphthongs NAPLAN Editing p. 15 p. 16 5 minutes Spelling & Spelling Workbook: Grammar Review of Year 4 15 minutes Diphthongs Pretest pp. 11-12 Day 10 Review Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Diphthongs Posttest pp. 17-18 pp. 13-14 Picture Dictionary: determine, describe Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1493 Identify prepositional phrases. Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1493 Identify prepositional phrases. p. 5 p. 6 Reading Fluency ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of 30 minutes your choosing. Lessons ACELY1704 Use 100 minutes compound sentences. p. 33 ACELT1611 Identify and interpret personification. p. 30 your choosing. ACELY1704 Use

compound sentences. (continued) your choosing. ACELA1507 Identify complex sentences. p. 46 p. 33 ACELY1704 Use compound sentences. ACELT1611 Identify and interpret similes. p. 43 p. 8 ACELT1611 Identify and interpret metaphors. your choosing. ACELA1507 Identify complex sentences. (continued) p. 46 ACELT1611 Identify and interpret personification. p. 31 p. 19 Year 5 [email protected] ii 2014 All rights reserved. Sentences & Figurative Language Day 11 Opening Classroom Norms (PBIS) Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Multisyllable Words Spell Incorrect Words 5 Times Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Multisyllable Words Spelling Activity

Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Multisyllable Words NAPLAN Editing p. 23 p. 24 5 minutes Spelling & Spelling Workbook: Grammar Review of Year 4 15 minutes Multisyllable Words Pretest pp. 19-20 pp. 21-22 Picture Dictionary: explain, convey, literal Day 15 Review Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Multisyllable Words Posttest pp. 25-26 Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1495 Determine the function of prepositional phrases Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1493 Identify prepositional phrases. p. 7 p. 8 Reading Fluency ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of 30 minutes your choosing. Lessons ACELY1698 Explain 100 minutes how idioms convey ideas and opinions. p. 55 ACELA1507 Identify complex sentences. p. 52 Year 5 [email protected] your choosing. your choosing. ACELY1698 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. (continued) ACELT1611 Use figurative language.

p. 55 p. 65 ACELT1611 Identify and interpret personification. ACELY1704 Use compound sentences. your choosing. Quiz1 p. 32 p. 44 iii 2014 All rights reserved. Sentences & Figurative Language Day 16 Opening Classroom Norms (PBIS) Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Double Consonants Spell Incorrect Words 5 Times Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Double Consonants Spelling Activity Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Double Consonants NAPLAN Editing 5 minutes Spelling & Spelling Workbook: Grammar Review of Year 4 Double 15 minutes Consonants Pretest pp. 27-28 Picture Dictionary: language, recognise, variety pp. 29-30 Grammar Workbook:

Review of Year 4 ACELA1495 Determine the function of prepositional phrases. p. 31 Day 20 Review Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Spell words with Double Consonants Posttest pp. 33-34 p. 32 Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1495 Determine the function of prepositional phrases. pp. 9-10 p. 11 Reading Fluency ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of 30 minutes your choosing Lessons ACELT1611 Use 100 minutes figurative language. (continued) p. 65 ACELY1698 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. p. 62 your choosing. your choosing. your choosing. ACELT1611 Use figurative language. (continued) ACELA1505 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. ACELA1505 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. (continued) p. 65 p. 78 ACELA1507 Identify complex sentences. ACELT1611 Use figurative language. p. 53

p. 75 ACELT1611 Identify and interpret similes. [email protected] ACELY1698 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. p. 63 ACELT1611 Identify and interpret metaphors. p. 9 Year 5 p. 78 p. 20 iv 2014 All rights reserved. Sentences & Figurative Language Day 21 Opening Classroom Norms (PBIS) Day 22 Day 23 Day 24 Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Silent Beginning Consonants Spell Incorrect Words 5 Times Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Silent Beginning Consonants Spelling Activity Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Silent Beginning Consonants NAPLAN Editing 5 minutes Spelling & Spelling Workbook: Grammar Review of Year 4 Silent 15 minutes Beginning Consonants Pretest pp. 35-36 p. 39

pp. 37-38 Picture Dictionary: edit, revise, text your choosing. 100 minutes p. 95 ACELA1505 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. p. 89 pp. 41-42 p. 40 p. 13 Reading Fluency ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of 30 minutes Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Silent Beginning Consonants Posttest Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1495 Determine the function of prepositional phrases. Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1495 Determine the function of prepositional phrases. p. 12 Lessons ACELY1705 Edit text. Day 25 Assessment your choosing. ACELY1705 Edit text. (continued) your choosing. ACELY1705 Revise text. p. 95 your choosing. Review Assessment 1 p. 109 ACELT1611 Use figurative language. ACELY1705 Edit text. p. 106 p. 76 ACELY1698 Explain how

idioms convey ideas and opinions. ACELY1704 Use compound sentences. p. 45 p. 64 Year 5 [email protected] v 2014 All rights reserved. Working with Narratives Day 26 Opening Classroom Norms (PBIS) Day 27 Day 28 Day 29 Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Words With E-Drop Spell Incorrect Words 5 Times Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Words With E-Drop Spelling Activity Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Words With E-Drop NAPLAN Editing 5 minutes Spelling & Spelling Workbook: Grammar Review of Year 4 Words 15 minutes With E-Drop Pretest pp. 43-44 Picture Dictionary: attributes, language, feature pp. 45-46 p. 47 Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1492 Use quotation marks. 30 minutes

ACELA1490 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. p. 122 Lessons ACELA1504 100 minutes Recognise the attributes of a narrative. p. 121 ACELY1705 Edit text. p. 107 ACELY1705 Revise text. p. 118 [email protected] pp. 49-50 p. 48 p. 16 Selection from ACELT1610 Identify the narrator. ACELY1702 Read book of your choosing. p. 135 Selection from ACELY1701 Identify the language features of imaginative text. p. 148 ACELT1610 Identify the narrator. ACELT1610 Identify the narrator. (continued) p. 134 p. 134 ACELA1505 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. ACELA1504 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. p. 91 p. 131 ACELT1611 Identify and interpret metaphors. ACELA1507 Identify complex sentences. ACELY1701 Identify the language features of imaginative text. p. 147 ACELT1610 Identify the

narrator. p. 144 p. 21 p. 54 Year 5 Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Words With E-Drop Posttest Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1492 Use quotation marks. pp. 14-15 Reading Fluency Selection from Day 30 Review vi 2014 All rights reserved. Working with Narratives Day 31 Opening Classroom Norms (PBIS) Day 32 Day 33 Day 34 Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Homophones Spell Incorrect Words 5 Times Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Homophones Spelling Activity Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Homophones NAPLAN Editing pp. 53-54 p. 55 p. 56 5 minutes Spelling & Spelling Workbook: Grammar Review of Year 4

15 minutes Homophones Pretest pp. 51-52 Picture Dictionary: replace, describe, specific Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1492 Use quotation marks. Day 35 Review Spelling Workbook: Review of Year 4 Homophones Posttest pp. 57-58 Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1494 Identify direct and indirect speech. p. 17 pp. 18 Reading Fluency Selection from 30 minutes ACELA1490 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. ACELY1702 Read book of your choosing. ACELY1702 Read book of your choosing. ACELA1508 Add descriptions to writing. (add nouns and adjectives to a description). ACELA1508 Add descriptions to writing. (add nouns and adjectives to a description). (continued) ACELY1702 Read book of your choosing. p. 132 Lessons ACELY1701 Identify the 100 minutes language features of imaginative text. (continued) p. 147 ACELT1611 Use figurative language. p. 77

ACELA1504 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. p. 132 Year 5 [email protected] p. 158 p. 158 ACELT1610 Identify the narrator. ACELY1701 Identify the language features of imaginative text. Quiz 2 p. 145 p. 155 ACELY1705 Revise text. p. 119 vii 2014 All rights reserved. Working with Narratives Day 36 Opening Classroom Norms (PBIS) Day 37 Day 38 Day 39 Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Spelling Workbook: ACELA1513 Spell Words With Prefixes Spell Incorrect Words 5 Times Spelling Workbook: ACELA1513 Spell Words With Prefixes Spelling Activity Spelling Workbook: ACELA1513 Spell Words With Prefixes NAPLAN Editing 5 minutes Spelling & Spelling Workbook: Grammar ACELA1513 Spell Words 15 minutes With Prefixes Pretest

pp. 59-60 Picture Dictionary: affect, appearance, trait pp. 61-62 p. 63 30 minutes Lessons 100 minutes Selection from ACELY1701 Identify the language features of imaginative text. p. 171 ACELT1610 Explain how points of view affect the story. p. 156 ACELT1610 Explain how points of view affect the story. (continued) ACELA1508 Add descriptions to writing. (add nouns and adjectives to a description). p. 167 Year 5 [email protected] pp. 65-66 p. 64 p. 20 ACELT1610 Explain how points of view affect the story. p. 170 Spelling Workbook: ACELA1513 Spell Words With Prefixes Posttest Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1494 Identify direct and indirect speech. Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1494 Identify direct and indirect speech. p. 19 Reading Fluency Selection from Day 40 Review

Selection from ACELT1612 Explain character traits. p. 183 p. 170 ACELY1701 Identify the language features of imaginative text. ACELT1612 Explain character traits. p. 182 ACELA1505 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. p. 93 p. 156 Selection from ACELT1610 Explain how points of view affect the story. p. 179 ACELT1612 Explain character traits. (continued) p. 182 ACELT1610 Explain how points of view affect the story. p. 179 ACELY1705 Edit text. p. 108 viii 2014 All rights reserved. Working with Narratives Day 41 Opening Classroom Norms (PBIS) Day 42 Day 43 Day 44 Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Classroom Norms (PBIS) Spelling Workbook: ACELA1513 Spell Words With Prefixes Spell Incorrect Words 5 Times Spelling Workbook: ACELA1513 Spell Words With Prefixes Spelling Activity Spelling Workbook: ACELA1513 Spell Words With Prefixes

NAPLAN Editing 5 minutes Spelling & Spelling Workbook: Grammar ACELA1513 Spell Words 15 minutes With Prefixes Pretest pp. 67-68 Picture Dictionary: plan, write, organise pp. 69-70 p. 71 Lessons ACELY1704 Plan a 100 minutes narrative. p. 193 ACELT1612 Explain character traits. p. 190 ACELA1504 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. p. 133 pp. 73-74 Grammar Workbook: Review of Year 4 ACELA1494 Identify direct and indirect speech. Reading Fluency ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of ACELY1702 Read book of your choosing. Spelling Workbook: ACELA1513 Spell Words With Prefixes Posttest p. 72 p. 21 30 minutes Day 45 Assessment your choosing. your choosing. ACELY1704 Plan a narrative. (continued) ACELY1704 Write a narrative. Review Assessment 2 p. 207

p. 193 ACELT1610 Explain how points of view affect the story. p. 180 ACELY1705 Revise text. ACELY1704 Plan a narrative. p. 201 ACELT1612 Explain character traits. p. 191 p. 120 ACELT1610 Identify the narrator. p. 146 Year 5 [email protected] ix 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will identify and interpret similes. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELT 1611 Recognise that ideas in literary texts can be conveyed from different viewpoints, which can lead to different kinds of interpretations and responses. Embedded Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY 1702 Read with fluency. Prerequisite(s): Special Instructions: Year 5 ACELT 1611 has been split into six objectives that dig deeper into the types of figurative language students will come across in literature. This objective will address similes, while subsequent lessons will address metaphors, personification, imagery, sound devices and figurative language as a whole. Vocabulary Academic: Content: interpret, literal figurative language, simile Support: EDI Lesson Overview A1 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will identify and interpret1 similes. Read the learning objective to your partner.

What does interpret mean? Interpret means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge Jim is as tall as a skyscraper. Is Jim really as tall as a skyscraper? What do you think the sentence means? (Pair-Share) Make the Connection Students, when we want to say or write something so it sounds more interesting, we use figurative language. Now, we will identify and interpret a type of figurative language called a simile. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.1 Identify and interpret similes. 1 explain 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development Figurative language refers to words or phrases that go beyond their literal 2 meaning. Figurative language is used to help the reader see and feel what is happening. One type of figurative language is a simile. Similes compare two unlike things using like or as. To interpret similes we explain what they mean. Similes My Cat Lola 1. My cat, Lola, is a lot of fun. 2. Lola jumps as high as a kangaroo. 3. She jumps to catch her ball. 4. She even flips like a circus animal! 5. I have the best time playing with Lola. By using a simile, the author painted a picture in your mind of what Lola looks like when she jumps and flips! 36 words Checking for Understanding Similes Meaning Lola jumps as high as a kangaroo. She even flips like a circus animal! Lola jumps very high. Lola does amazing flips. Which sentence is an example of a

simile? How do you know? A His backpack was heavy. B His backpack was as heavy as a load of bricks! In your own words, what is a simile? A simile is __________. Non-Example: She likes to jump and catch her ball. Definitions 2 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.1 Identify and interpret similes. 2 exact 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Similes compare two unlike things using like or as. To interpret similes we explain what they mean. Checking for Understanding Identify and interpret similes. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the simile. (underline) Identify the two things being compared. (circle) Interpret the meaning of the simile. (complete the sentence) 1 How did I/you identify the simile? 2 How did I/you identify the two things being compared? 3 How did I/you interpret the simile? 1. Yvette knows all her multiplication facts. Yvettes brain is like a calculator! Yvettes brain is like a calculator The simile ___________________________________means Yvette is very good at maths __________________________________________. 2. The day was as hot as an oven! Jessica and Maria decided to go the day was as hot as an oven swimming. the day was extremely hot The simile ___________________________________means __________________________________________. 3. The web is beautiful. It looks like dreamcatcher it looks like aa dream catcherfor forspiders. spiders the web was very beautiful The simile ________________________________________means __________________________________________.

4. The new baby is adorable. She is as cute as a kitten! she is as cute as a kitten The simile ___________________________________means the baby is very cute __________________________________________. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.1 Identify and interpret similes. 3 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Similes compare two unlike things using like or as. To interpret similes we explain what they mean. 1 Identifying and interpreting similes will help you understand what you are reading. The cheetah was as fast as a flash of light. This means the cheetah is very fast. 2 Identifying and interpreting similes will help you do well on tests. Understanding the Relevance Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to identify and interpret similes? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to identify and interpret similes? You may give me one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.1 Identify and interpret similes. 4 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Identify and interpret similes. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the simile. (underline) Identify the two things being compared. (circle) Interpret the meaning of the simile. (complete the sentence) Similes compare two unlike things using like or as. To interpret similes we explain what they mean. 1. At the zoo, Matthew saw a snake as long as a garden hose. snake as long as a garden hose The similea___________________________________means the snake was very long __________________________________________. 2. He even saw a flamingo as pink as bubble gum! a ___________________________________means flamingo as pink as bubble gum The simile the flamingo looked bright pink __________________________________________.

Extended Thinking Which sentence uses a simile? How do you know? A Kelsi was as busy as a squirrel before winter. B Kayla was very busy all day at school. Word Bank identify Summary Closure What did you learn today about identifying and interpreting similes? interpret figurative similes language (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.1 Identify and interpret similes. 5 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Identify and interpret similes. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the simile. (underline) Identify the two things being compared. (circle) Interpret the meaning of the simile. (complete the sentence) Similes compare two unlike things using like or as. To interpret similes we explain what they mean. 1. Lily mixed the biscuit ingredients together. The dough was as sticky as glue. dough was as sticky as glue The simile ___________________________________means the dough was very sticky __________________________________________. 2. When the biscuits were finished, they were as big as soccer balls! were as big as soccer balls The similethey ___________________________________means the biscuits were very big __________________________________________. 3. Rosies brother is like a bulldozer. He breaks everything! Rosies brother is like a bulldozer The simile ___________________________________means Rosies brother is very destructive __________________________________________. 4. Last week he flattened our sandcastle like a pancake! like a pancake

The simile sandcastle ___________________________________means the sandcastle was knocked down flat __________________________________________. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.1 Identify and interpret similes. 6 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Identify and interpret similes. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the simile. (underline) Identify the two things being compared. (circle) Interpret the meaning of the simile. (complete the sentence) Similes compare two unlike things using like or as. To interpret similes we explain what they mean. 1. Surfing off the east coast can be like swimming in a shark tank! Surfing is like swimming in a shark tank The simile _________________________________________means surfing is very dangerous __________________________________________. 2. The roadway looked like water in the bright sun. The simile ___________________________________means roadway looked like water __________________________________________. the roadway seemed to be shiny and ripple in the sun Extended Thinking Read the passage below and underline any similes. The Soccer Game 1. Joe was excited to play in his first soccer game. 2. However, when he saw the other team he began to worry. 3. They were as big as giants! 4. Joe walked carefully on to the field. 5. He noticed the mean look on the opposing goalies face, and his legs began to wobble like those of a baby animal taking its first steps. 6. I can do this! thought Joe. 7. I can do this! he repeated as he stepped up to the ball, ready to kick off. 65 words How do the similes make the story more interesting? (Pair-Share) (Answers vary) The similes make the story more interesting by Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.1 Identify and interpret similes. 7 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2

Remember the Concept Identify and interpret similes. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the simile. (underline) Identify the two things being compared. (circle) Interpret the meaning of the simile. (complete the sentence) Similes compare two unlike things using like or as. To interpret similes we explain what they mean. 1. Julias room is like a pig pen. She cant even walk around. Julias room is like a pig pen The simile ________________________________________means Julias room is very messy __________________________________________. 2. After cleaning for three hours, her room was as organised as a library. her room was as organised as a library The simile ________________________________________means her room was very organised __________________________________________. Extended Thinking Read the passage below and underline any similes. Recess 1. Rebecca and Alicia cant wait for recess! 2. They have so many exciting games to play. 3. Rebeccas favourite game is tag because she is as fast as the wind. 4. Nobody can ever catch her! 5. Alicia is good at jump rope because her feet are like lightning bolts. 6. The two girls are counting the minutes until the bell rings. 58 words How do the similes make the story more interesting? (Pair-Share) (Answers vary) The similes make the story more interesting by Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.1 Identify and interpret similes. 8 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept Identify and interpret similes. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the simile. (underline) Identify the two things being compared. (circle) Interpret the meaning of the simile. (complete the sentence) Similes compare two unlike things

using like or as. To interpret similes we explain what they mean. 1. My mum makes the best scones! Eating one is like biting into a fluffy cloud. eating one is like biting into a fluffy cloud The simile ________________________________________means the scones are very soft and light __________________________________________. 2. When my mum makes a batch of scones, people come like a plague of locusts to eat them. people come like a plague of locusts The simile ________________________________________means people come quickly and in large groups __________________________________________. Extended Thinking hich of the following sentences contain a simile? (select all that apply) e ready to explain your answers. A The rain came down in buckets. B Rain came down like a waterfall over a steep cliff. C The lightning lit up the sky as if it were daytime. D After the clouds parted, a rainbow of light appeared. E Clouds moved across the sky like mice scurrying to their hole. F The thunder growled angrily causing the ground to rumble. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.1 Identify and interpret similes. 9 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will identify and interpret metaphors. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELT 1611 Recognise that ideas in literary texts can be conveyed from different viewpoints, which can lead to different kinds of interpretations and responses. Embedded Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY 1702 Read with fluency. Prerequisite(s): Special Instructions: Year 5 ACELT 1611.1 Identify and interpret similes. Year 5 ACELT 1611 has been split into six objectives that dig deeper into the types of figurative language students will come across in literature. This objective will address metaphors, while subsequent lessons will address personification, imagery, sound devices, and figurative language as a whole. Vocabulary Academic: Content: interpret, literal, unfamiliar, qualities figurative language, metaphor Support: EDI Lesson Overview A10

2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will identify and interpret1 metaphors. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does interpret mean? Interpret means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge The house was covered in a blanket of snow. Was the house really covered with a blanket? What do you think the sentence means? (Pair-Share) Make the Connection Students, when we want to say or write something so it sounds more interesting, we use figurative language. Now, we will identify and interpret a type of figurative language called a metaphor. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. 10 explain 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development Figurative language refers to words or phrases that go beyond their literal2 meaning. Figurative language is used to help the reader see and feel what is happening. One type of figurative language is a metaphor. Metaphors describe something unfamiliar3 by comparing it to the qualities4 of something familiar. To interpret metaphors we use prior knowledge of the familiar to understand the meaning of the unfamiliar thing. Metaphors Charlie the Crab 1. Charlie the crab lived on the north side of the beach. 2. When he moved along the shore, Charlie was a dancing pair of scissors, clicking across the sand. Metaphor Two things being compared Charlie was a dancing pair of scissors Charlie the crab and a pair of

scissors 28 words Prior Knowledge Meaning I know scissors open and close Charlie opened and closed his claws as he moved across the sand. By using a metaphor, the author painted a picture in your mind of how Charlie looked while he moved. Checking for Understanding Which sentence is an example of a metaphor? How do you know? A B His backpack was a heavy dumbbell on his back! In your own words, what is a metaphor? A metaphor is __________. Definitions 2 3 Non-Example: Charlie the crab lived on the north side of the beach. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. 11 His backpack was heavy. 4 exact unknown features 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Metaphors describe something unfamiliar by comparing it to the qualities of something familiar. To interpret metaphors we use prior knowledge of the familiar to understand the meaning of the unfamiliar thing. Identify and interpret metaphors. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the metaphor. (underline) Identify the two things being compared. (circle) Interpret the meaning of the metaphor. (complete the table) Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you identify the

metaphor? 2 How did I/you identify the two things being compared? 3 How did I/you interpret the metaphor? 1. Marty is a calculator. She knows all her multiplications facts by memory. Metaphor Prior Knowledge Marty is a calculator I know calculators help us do maths. Meaning Marty must be good at maths. 2. The sun was an oven, baking us on the playground. Metaphor Prior Knowledge The sun was an oven I know ovens get very hot. Meaning The sun must have been very hot. 3. The kitten was a cloud of white fur. Metaphor Prior Knowledge Kitten was a cloud I know clouds are fluffy. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. Meaning The kitten must be fluffy. 12 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Checking for Understanding Read the passage, paying close attention to the underlined metaphor. 1. Amy and Elliot had walked to school together every day since they were five. 2. But when Amy made new friends at school, she began ignoring Elliot and calling him the same mean names that her new friends used for him. 3. Elliot knew that their friendship was an unsinkable ship, and he hoped that eventually Amy would apologise. 4. Finally, Amy did apologise to Elliot. 5. She decided that her new friends were not friends at all.

1 How did I/you determine the purpose for reading? 2 How did I/you locate information that matches the purpose? 3 How did I/you ensure my/your response matched the purpose? 74 words The underlined metaphor suggests that: A Elliot was on a ship thinking about his friendship with Amy. B Their friendship could never end. C Amy was trying to sink their friendship by being mean to Elliot. D Even if Amy apologised, their friendship was already Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. damaged. 13 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Metaphors describe something unfamiliar by comparing it to the qualities of something familiar. To interpret metaphors we use prior knowledge of the familiar to understand the meaning of the unfamiliar thing. 1 Identifying and interpreting metaphors will help you understand what you are reading. The cheetah was a lightning bolt. I know lightning bolts flash so fast that if you blink you will miss them. So, the cheetah must be very fast! 2 Identifying and interpreting metaphors will help you do well on tests. Understanding the Relevance Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to identify and interpret metaphors? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to identify and interpret metaphors? You may give me one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. 14 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept

Identify and interpret metaphors. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the metaphor. (underline) Identify the two things being compared. (circle) Interpret the meaning of the metaphor. (complete the table) Metaphors describe something unfamiliar by comparing it to the qualities of something familiar. To interpret metaphors we use prior knowledge of the familiar to understand the meaning of the unfamiliar thing. 1. The snake at the zoo was a garden hose, ready to strike. Metaphor Prior Knowledge The snake at the zoo was a garden hose. I know garden hoses are usually long and green. Meaning The snake must be long and green. 2. The bubble gum flamingo ate fish from the water! Metaphor Prior Knowledge bubble gum flamingo I know bubble gum is pink. Meaning The flamingo must be pink. Extended Thinking Which sentence uses a metaphor? How do you know? A Mels hope was a fragile seed. B Mel felt hopeless about her chances of winning. Summary Closure Word Bank identify interpret metaphors familiar unfamiliar What did you learn today about identifying and interpreting metaphors? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors.

15 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Identify and interpret metaphors. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the metaphor. (underline) Identify the two things being compared. (circle) Interpret the meaning of the metaphor. (complete the table) Metaphors describe something unfamiliar by comparing it to the qualities of something familiar. To interpret metaphors we use prior knowledge of the familiar to understand the meaning of the unfamiliar thing. 1. Aaron was a rocket blasting down the soccer field. Metaphor Prior Knowledge Aaron was a rocket blasting down the soccer field. I know a rocket goes very fast. Meaning Aaron must be going very fast down the soccer field. 2. The car seat was a hot barbeque that fried my legs. Metaphor Prior Knowledge Meaning The car seat was a hot barbeque I know that a barbeque is very hot to cook food. The car seat was very hot. 3. Mr Tomlins computer was a dinosaur. It needed to be replaced. Metaphor computer was a dinosaur Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. Prior Knowledge Meaning

I know that dinosaurs are old and extinct. Mr Tomlins computer must be old. 16 2014 All rights reserved. ndependent Practice (continued) Remember the Concept Read the passage, paying close attention to the underlined metaphor. Metaphors describe something unfamiliar by comparing it to the qualities of something familiar. To interpret metaphors we use prior knowledge of the familiar to understand the meaning of the unfamiliar thing. 1. When William stayed home sick from school last week, his friend Jacob brought him some soup and a new book to read. 2. It was then that William realised friends are the flowers in the garden of life. 37 words The underlined metaphor suggests that: A Gardening is best done with friends. B Friends will bring you flowers when you are sick. C Life is like a garden that is blooming with friends. D Friends are beautiful and colourful parts of our life. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. 17 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept 1. Bree was a lighthouse beacon in a sea of blue water. Metaphor Prior Knowledge Bree was a lighthouse beacon I know that lighthouse beacons are bright so they can be easily seen. Meaning Bree must stand out from the crowd. Metaphors describe something unfamiliar by comparing it to the qualities of something familiar. To interpret metaphors we use prior knowledge of the familiar to understand the meaning of the

unfamiliar thing. 2. The weather forecast was a dream come true. Metaphor Prior Knowledge weather forecast was a dream come true I know a dream come true means that you get just what you want. Extended Thinking Meaning The weather forecast must have been just what he wanted. Read the passage, paying close attention to the underlined metaphor. An Autumn Greeting "Come," said the Wind to the Leaves one day. "Come over the meadow and we will play. Put on your dresses of red and gold. For summer is gone and the days grow cold." excerpt from http://www.storyit.com/Classics/JustPoems/autumngreet.htm The underlined metaphor suggests that: A Autumn is greeting the wind and wants to get dressed up. B The season is changing to autumn, and leaves are compared to red and gold dresses as their colours change. C Red and gold dresses are the sign that summer is over. D Once summer is over the leaves fall off the trees and then winter arrives. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. 18 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept 1. I cant fit another thing into my timetable. My plate is already too full. Metaphor My plate is already too full. Prior Knowledge Meaning I know a plate is a flat, limited space. The timetable must be too full to fit anything else. Metaphors describe something unfamiliar by comparing it to the qualities of something familiar. To interpret metaphors we use prior knowledge of the familiar to understand the meaning of the

unfamiliar thing. 2. Children have an enormous appetite for learning. Feed them well. Metaphor Prior Knowledge Children have an enormous appetite for learning. I know having an enormous appetite means that you can eat a lot. Meaning Children must be able to learn a lot. Extended Thinking Identify metaphors in the passage below. 1. There were other trees in the garden, and one of the things which made the place look strangest and loveliest was that climbing roses had run all over them and swung down long tendrils 1 which made light swaying curtains 2. and here and there they had caught at each other or at a far-reaching branch and had crept from one tree to another and made lovely bridges of themselves. 70 words adapted from The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. What two things are being compared in the passage above? (PairShare) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. 19 Definitions 1 thin leafless curling stems of a plant 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept 1. The player was a superhero. Metaphor The player was a superhero Prior Knowledge Meaning I know superheroes do amazing things. The player must have done something amazing. Metaphors describe something unfamiliar by comparing it to the qualities of something familiar. To interpret metaphors we use

prior knowledge of the familiar to understand the meaning of the unfamiliar thing. 2. The whale vacuumed the plankton from the ocean. Metaphor Prior Knowledge Meaning The whale vacuumed the plankton I know vacuums suck up everything off the floor. The whale must have sucked up all the plankton. Extended Thinking Which of the following sentences contain a metaphor? (select all that apply) A The rain came down in buckets. B Rain came down like a waterfall over a steep cliff. C The lightning was a night-light for the animals below. D After the clouds parted, a rainbow of light appeared. E Clouds moved across the sky like mice scurrying to their hole. F The thunder rumbled causing the ground to shake. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. 20 2014 All rights reserved. Writing Extension Activity Metaphors often compare concrete nouns (flower, cloud, person) to abstract nouns (love, trust, evil). Concrete Nouns skateboard pizza backpack movie flower chains necklace truck milk cloud sun

earth Abstract Nouns love hate betrayal jealousy envy sacrifice trust friendship commitment anxiety confidence hope Select one concrete noun and one abstract noun and explore 1. ____________ is a ______________ the relationship between the two items. _________________________________________ Use the formula below. The first one is done for you. ____________________________________________________________________________ (abstract noun) is a (concrete noun) (explain how they are similar). _ Love flower the more you nurture it the 2. ____________ is a ______________ more beautiful it _________________________________________ becomes. ____________________________________________________________________________ _ 3. ____________ is a ______________ _________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ _ 4. ____________ is a ______________ Australian Curriculum English _________________________________________ Year 5 Literature 1611.2 Identify and interpret metaphors. 21 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will identify and interpret personification. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELT 1611 Understand, interpret and experiment with sound devices and imagery, including simile, metaphor and personification, in narratives, shape poetry, songs, anthems and odes Embedded Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY 1702 Navigate and read texts for specific purposes applying appropriate text processing strategies, for example predicting and confirming, monitoring meaning, skimming and scanning. Year 5 ACELY 1703 Use comprehension strategies to analyse information, integrating and linking ideas from a variety of print and digital sources. Prerequisite(s):

Year 4 ACELT 1606 Understand, interpret and experiment with a range of devices and deliberate word play in poetry and other literary texts, for example nonsense words, spoonerisms, neologisms and puns Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: Reading and comprehending poetry is difficult for students. Make sure to use several reading strategies to help students make meaning of the text. Teachers, please note that no distinction has been made in this lesson between personification (when human-like traits are assigned to non-human things) and anthropomorphism (when an animal or object acts as a human would). Vocabulary Academic: qualities, visual Content: personification Support: crag, azure, thunderbolt, famine, threefold, paddocks, dandelion tuft, expression, anxiously, beckoned, sheltered A22 EDI Lesson Overview 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will identify and interpret1 personification. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does interpret mean? Interpret means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge Which sentences describe things that rivers cannot do? 1. The river gave a gentle kick to the pebbles underneath. 2. The river was moving the pebbles underneath. 3. The river angrily twirled the pebbles underneath. 4. The river was rapidly moving the pebbles underneath. Make the Connection Students, you already know that rivers cannot do some things that humans can like kick and express anger. Now, you will learn that this type of writing is called personification. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.3 Identify and interpret personification. 22 explain 2014 All rights reserved.

Concept Development Personification is giving the qualities2 of a person to an animal or an object. Authors use personification to help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. dentify personification An Autumn Greeting "Come," said the Wind to the Leaves one day. "Come over to the meadow and we will play. Put on your dresses of red and gold. For summer is gone and the days grow cold. Checking for Understanding Which sentence has personification? How do you know? A The dogs tail moved back and forth when his owner came back from work. excerpt from Interpret personification http://www.storyit.com/Classics/JustPoems/autumngreet.htm The wind cannot talk to the leaves. The leaves cannot play or put on dresses. B The author uses personification to create a visual of what happens at the beginning of autumn. Autumn is the time of the year in which leaves change colour, fall off the trees and the weather starts to get cold. The dog danced with joy when the owner came back from work. C The dog was hungry when the owner came back from work. In you own words, what is personification? Personification is __________. Definitions 2 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.3 Identify and interpret personification. 23 traits 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Personification is giving the qualities of a person to an animal or an object. Authors use personification to help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Identify and interpret personification. 1 2 3

Read the question. Read the text. Select an answer. (circle) Checking for Understanding How did I/you select the answer? The Eagle by Alfred, Lord Tennyson He clasps the crag3 with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring'd with the azure4 world, he stands. Application When Tennyson uses azure world, what is he talking about? A B The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls. 1. When Tennyson uses crooked 2. When Tennyson uses crawls, hands, what is he talking about? what is he talking about? A B C D a child an eagle the sea a man It is personification because________. A B C D When Tennyson uses like a thunderbolt he falls, what is he creating a picture of? B how the eagle looks when flying how the sea moves underneath C how it looks when it is raining hard It is personification because________. Definitions 3 4 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.3 Identify and interpret personification. the clouds C the eagle

A a child. an eagle the sea a woman the sky 24 steep, rocky cliff bright blue 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Personification is giving the qualities of a person to an animal or an object. Authors use personification to help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Identify and interpret personification. 1 2 3 Read the question. Read the text. Select an answer. (circle) Checking for Understanding How did I/you select the answer? The Eagle by Alfred, Lord Tennyson He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring'd with the azure world, he stands. World Connection The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls. 3. Why did Tennyson use the words crooked hands? A To give the reader an example of how hard it is to hold on to the crag. B To help the reader better understand the danger of talons. C To give the reader an example of what the eagles talons look Australian Curriculum English like. Year 5 Literature 1611.3 Identify and interpret personification. Alfred Tennyson (18091892) In the last half of the 19th century he was considered England's greatest poet. People from every walk of life read and loved his work. 4. Why did Tennyson use the word crawls? A To give the reader an example of the movement of the sea. B To give the reader an example of the movement of the clouds. C To give the reader an example of the movement of the eagles

talons. 25 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Read the poem and answer the questions My Country by Dorothea Mackellar Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you determine the purpose for reading? 2 How did I/you locate information that matches the purpose? 3 How did I/you ensure my/your response matched the purpose? Core of my heart, my country! Land of the Rainbow Gold, For flood and fire and famine1 She pays us back threefold2, Over the thirsty paddocks3, Watch after many days, The veil ofuse greenness Why didfilmy Mackellar personification when she wrote that the That pays thickens we gaze. country us as back? Interpret the personification. Mackellar used personification to show that even though the ______________________________________________________________________________ land has flood, fire and famine, it still provides more than it _ Cultural Connection Dorothea Mackellar (1885 1968) was an Australian poet and fiction writer. Her poem My Country is perhaps the best known Australian poem. She wrote the poem when she was 19 years old. Listen to Dorothea Mackellar recite her poem. Listen to Dorothea Mackellars poem as a song. ______________________________________________________________________________ takes away. _ Mackellar used personification to show that the fields were dry Why did Mackellar use personification when she wrote that the paddocks

are thirsty? the are personification. and needed watering. ByInterpret saying they thirsty, Mackellar ______________________________________________________________________________ creates an emotional response from the reader. _ Australian Curriculum English ______________________________________________________________________________ Year 5 Literature 1611.3 26 Identify and interpret personification. _ Definitions 1 2 3 food shortage three times as much small fields 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Personification is giving the qualities of a person to an animal or an object. Authors use personification to help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. 1 Identifying and interpreting personification will help you understand literature. I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud by William Wordsworth Ten thousand (daffodils) saw I at a glance. 2. Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. 3. The waves beside them danced; but they out-did the sparkling waves in glee. 1. 2 Identifying and interpreting personification will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to identify and interpret personification? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to identify and interpret personification? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.3 Identify and interpret personification. 27 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Identify and interpret personification.

1 2 3 Read the question. Read the text. Select an answer. (circle) The Moon Was But a Chin of Gold by Emily Dickinson Personification is giving the qualities of a person to an animal or an object. Authors use personification to help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. The moon was but a chin of gold A night or two ago, And now she turns her perfect face Upon the world below. 1. When Dickinson uses Chin of Gold, what is she talking about? A a girl B the moon C the night It is personification because________. 2. Why did Dickinson use the words chin of gold? A To show that there is a lot of gold in the moon. B To give a visual of what the crescent moon looks like C To show how the moon appears at night. Extended Thinking Blake says that the poem above only has one example of personification. Do you agree or disagree with Blake? I agree with Blake. The text is comparing the moon to a face. Word Bank personification qualities visual feelings Summary Closure What did you learn today about identifying and interpreting personification? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.3 Identify and interpret personification. 28 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Personification is giving the qualities of a person to an animal or an object. Authors use personification to help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story.

Identify and interpret personification. 1 2 3 Read the question. Read the text. Select an answer. (circle) Rikki-Tikki-Tavi World Connection by Rudyard Kipling 1. Then inch by inch out of the grass rose up the head of Nag, the big black cobra, and he was five feet long from tongue to tail. 2. When he had one-third of himself clear of the ground, he stayed balancing to and fro exactly as a dandelion tuft1 dances in the wind; and he looked at Joseph Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was an English short-story writer, poet and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. Is Rikki-Tikki-Tavi a book for children or for soldiers? Explain. Rikki-tikki with wicked snake eyes that never change their expression2, whatever the snake may be thinking. 1. When Kipling uses dances in the wind,what is he talking about? 2. Why did Kipling use the words dances in the wind? A the wind A To show how the cobra moves. B the dandelion B To show how a dandelion tuft is carried C Rikki-tikki by the wind. C To show how Rikki-tikki likes to play It is personification because________. with the dandelion tuft. Application When Kipling uses he in Sentence 2, he is talking about? A Rikki-tikki B the dandelion tufts C the big black cobra Why does Kipling compares Nags balancing to and fro to the dandelions tuft dancing? A to show how pretty they look B to show that both like the wind C to show how they both have the same movement Definitions 1 2

Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.3 Identify and interpret personification. 29 (dandelion tuft) fluffy seeds that blow in the wind look 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Identify and interpret personification. Rikki-Tikki-Tavi by Rudyard Kipling 1. Then inch by inch out of the grass rose up the head of Nag, the big black cobra, and he was five feet long from tongue to tail. 2. When he had one-third of himself clear of the ground, he stayed balancing to and fro exactly as a dandelion tuft dances in the wind; and he looked at Rikki-tikki with wicked snake eyes that never change their expression, whatever the snake may be thinking. 1. When Kipling uses wicked and thinking, what is he talking about? Personification is giving the qualities of a person to an animal or an object. Authors use personification to help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. 2. Why did Kipling use the words wicked and thinking? A Rikki-tikki B a dandelion C Nag, the big black cobra A To show that the Nag can outsmart Rikki-tikki. B To show that Nag was a mean It is personification because________. character in the story. C To show that cobras are dangerous Extended Thinking animals. Connect the sentences that use personification to the ones that do not use personification. Explain. 1 The tsunami1 raced towards the city. A It was raining a lot. 2 The storm attacked the town with great anger. B It made a creaking sound.

The floor moaned2 as I stepped on it. C C 1 Connect Sentence _______ with Sentence _______. 3 It was moving fast. Definitions A 2 Connect Sentence _______ with Sentence _______. 1 2 B 3 Connect Sentence _______ with Sentence _______. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.3 Identify and interpret personification. 30 huge waves make a low sound 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Identify and interpret personification. How Kangaroo Got Its Pouch Australian Aboriginal Legend 1. "Joey! Where are you?" beckoned1 Mother Kangaroo, anxiously2 searching for her son. 2. "Come here now." 3. Mother Kangaroo searched every place, but couldn't find her Joey. 4. "That boy is always getting lost," she mumbled to herself. 5. "He's always hopping off." 6. Using her paw, she sheltered3 her eyes from the bright sun and went looking for 1. When the legend says Joey! Where are 2. Why did the legend use the words her you? Joey. who is talking? Joey! Where are you? A the son B Mother Kangaroo C the bushes It is personification because________. A To show that joeys are always getting lost. B Some people believe animals could talk in Dreamtime stories. C To show how human mothers act Extended Thinking Personification is giving the qualities of a person to an animal or an object. Authors use personification to help the reader see and feel

what is happening in the story. Cultural Connection A legend has been passed on from person-to-person and has important meaning for the culture in which it started. Why do you think the legend How Kangaroo Got Its Pouch is important in Australia? when looking for their children. Connect the sentences that use personification to the ones that do not use personification. Explain. 1 The blinking and winking stars of the night sky. A I wanted to drink it. The hot chocolate was whispering my name. 1 Connect Sentence _______ with Sentence 3 The coconut tree rocked its limbs with delight. 2 Connect Sentence _______ with Sentence B They were moving back and forth. 2 C _______. C They were shining brightly. A _______. Definitions 1 2 B 3 Connect Sentence _______ with Sentence _______. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.3 Identify and interpret personification. 3 31 called nervously shaded 2014 All rights reserved.

Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept Identify and interpret personification. Kangaroo Gets a Pouch Australian Aboriginal Legend "Joey! Where are you?" beckoned Mother Kangaroo, anxiously searching for her son. "Come here now." Mother Kangaroo searched everyplace, but couldn't find her Joey. "That boy is always getting lost," she mumbled to herself. "He's always hopping off." Using her paw, she sheltered her eyes from the bright sun and went looking for her Joey. 1. When the legend says she sheltered 2. Why did the legend use the words her eyes who is it talking about? she sheltered her eyes? A the joey B the Mother Kangaroo C the boy It is personification because________. A To show how mothers look for their children. B To show how humans act when trying to see when facing the sun. C To show how kangaroos use their paws when trying to see during a sunny day. Extended Thinking Write three sentences using personification. You may refer to the list of human qualities, if necessary. 1 2 The flowers gave a sweet kiss to the buzzing bees. This is how the elephants and crocodiles became best friends. The monkeys shed tears of sorrow when the trees fell. 3 (Answers vary) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.3 Identify and interpret personification. 32 Personification is giving the qualities of a person to an animal or an object. Authors use personification to help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Human Qualities love kiss sorrow friendship talking Animals & Things bees flowers monkeys trees elephants crocodiles 2014 All rights reserved.

Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will use compound sentences. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY 1704 Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive print and multimodal texts, choosing text structures, language features, images and sound appropriate to purpose and audience. Embedded Content Descriptor: Prerequisite(s): Year 4 ACELY 1694 Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts containing key information and supporting details for a widening range of audiences, demonstrating increasing control over text structures and language features. Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: This lesson only covers compound sentences. Subsequent lessons will cover complex sentences. In many sentences either and or but can be used to link the clauses. The meaning of the sentence is slightly different, but as long as students can justify their choice by explaining the relationship, either is correct. The conjunction nor requires the wording of the second clause be changed to avoid a double negative. Vocabulary Academic: determine, identify Content: compound sentence, coordinating conjunction Support: plane, astronomer, astronaut EDI Lesson Overview A33 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will use compound sentences. Read the learning objective to your partner. Activate Prior Knowledge Identify the conjunctions1 in the sentences below. (circle) Coordinating Conjunctions as, for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so 1.Paul is going to the river, and Bethany is staying at school. 2.I love pizza, but I dont like pineapple on it. 3.She was late for class, so she missed the test. 4.He set his alarm, yet he still overslept.

Make the Connection Students, you already know what conjunctions are. Now we will use conjunctions in compound sentences. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. 33 a word that connects words or clauses 2014 All rights reserved. Compound Sentence Concept Development A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction. Using nor requires changing the verb in the second clause to avoid a double negative. Compound Sentences I thought the video was very funny. Nathan did not like the humour. I thought the video was very funny, yet Nathan did not like the humour. SV, cSV Coordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships2) and (addition) but, yet (difference/contrast) or (choice) so (result) nor (negative choice) as, for (reason) Checking for Understanding Which sentences have a relationship of addition? How do you know? Sylvia does not eat meat. She had a cheese pizza. Sylvia does not eat meat, so she had a cheese pizza. A A doctor treats sick people, and they help keep people well. Go to Skill Dev 1 B A doctor treats illnesses. A doctor does not fix teeth. Checking for Understanding Which sentence correctly shows a negative choice? Explain. He will need to leave early. It is a long drive. He will need to leave early, as it is a long drive.

A She doesnt like snakes, nor she doesnt like spiders. B She doesnt like snakes, nor does she like spiders. I dont like spiders. I dont like bugs. I dont like spiders, nor do I like bugs. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. Go to Skill Dev 2 34 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice 1 A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction. Use compound sentences. 1 2 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the relationship between the sentences. (circle) a Determine which coordinating conjunction to use. b Many sentences may have two correct choices. Explain your choice. 3 Rewrite the sentences as a compound sentence. Relationshi p 1. The outer planets are mostly made of gas. These planets are huge compared to Earth. , and The outer planets are mostly made of gas _____________ these planets are huge compared to Earth. 2. There are eight planets in the solar system. They all orbit around the sun. , and There are eight planets in the solar system ________________ they all orbit around the sun. Checking for Understanding 2 How did I/you identify the relationship between the sentences? 2a How did I/you determine which coordinating conjunction to use? Compound Sentence Contrast SV, cSV Addition Coordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) and (addition) but, yet (difference/contrast) or (choice) so (result)

nor (negative choice) as, for (reason) Contrast Addition 3. All of the orbits are in the same plane4. The orbits are at different distances from the sun. , but All of the orbits are in the same plane _________________ the orbits are at different distances from the sun. , It but 4. Pluto was once called the ninth planet. was reclassified as a dwarf planet. Pluto wasEnglish once called the ninth planet _______________ it Australian Curriculum Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 was reclassified as a dwarf planet. 35 Use compound sentences. Contrast Addition Definitions 2 3 Contrast 4 find figure out flat surface Addition 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice 1 (continued) A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction. Use compound sentences. 1 2 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the relationship between the sentences. (circle) a Determine which coordinating conjunction to use. b Many sentences may have two correct choices. Explain your choice. 3 Rewrite the sentences as a compound sentence. Checking for Understanding Relationshi p 5. In 2006 the definition of a planet was changed. Pluto is no longer considered a planet. , so In 2006 the definition of a planet was changed

___________ Pluto is no longer a considered a planet. 6. The sun is the source of all our energy. The sun is very important , so The sun is the source of all our energy ________________ the sun is very important. 7. I want to become an astronomer5. I could become an astronaut6. , or I want to become an astronomer __________ I could become an astronaut. 8. I could study stars and planets. I might be able to go to , or another planet someday. I could study stars and planets ___________ I might be Australian able Curriculum to goEnglish to another planet someday. Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. 36 2 How did I/you identify the relationship between the sentences? 2a How did I/you determine which coordinating conjunction to use? Compound Sentence SV, cSV Choice Coordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) Result and (addition) but, yet (difference/contrast) or (choice) so (result) nor (negative choice) as, for (reason) Choice Result Choice Back to Concept Dev Result Definitions Choice

5 6 scientist who studies stars and planets someone who travels to space Result 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice 2 A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction. Use compound sentences. 1 2 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the relationship between the sentences. (circle) a Determine which coordinating conjunction to use. b Many sentences may have two correct choices. Explain your choice. 3 Rewrite the sentences as a compound sentence. Relationshi p 1. Astronomers have discovered new moons and planets. Telescopes have improved. Astronomers have discovered new moons and , as planets _______________ telescopes have improved. 2. The planet Neptune was first seen with a telescope. It is too far away to see with your eyes. The planet Neptune was first seen with a , as telescope ____________ it is too far away to see with your eyes. 3. No human being has been to another planet. We havent landed a spacecraft on any planet except Mars. , nor have we No human being has been to another planet ____________ landed a spacecraft on any planet except Mars. 4. Most of the planets are too hot or too cold for living things. There isnt any liquid water on their surfaces. Most of theisplanets , nor there are too hot or too cold for living things ___________ any liquid water on their surfaces. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. 37 Checking for Understanding 2 How did I/you identify the relationship between the sentences? 2a How did I/you determine which coordinating conjunction to use? Compound Sentence Negative Choice SV, cSV

Reason Coordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) Negative Choice Reason and (addition) but, yet (difference/contrast) or (choice) so (result) nor (negative choice) as, for (reason) Negative Choice Reason Negative Choice Reason 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Checking for Understanding Use compound sentences. 1 2 1 Read the sentences carefully. Explain the mistake. 2 3 5. Joseph rewrote the sentences below into a compound sentence. His teacher said that he used the wrong coordinating conjunction. Explain the mistake he made. David likes soccer. Jack prefers football. 4 5 How did I/you determine what the question or prompt is asking? How did I/you determine the ELA concept required? How did I/you determine the relevant information? How did I/you answer the question? How did I/you determine if all parts of the question have been answered? David likes soccer, so Jack prefers football. The relationship between the two clauses is not a result. The conjunctions and or but would be correct.

6. Ella rewrote the sentences below into a compound sentence. Her teacher said that she used the wrong coordinating conjunction. Explain the mistake she made. There are many types of snakes or some types are poisonous. The relationship between the two clauses is not a choice. The conjunction and would be correct. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. 38 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction. 1 Using compound sentences will help you connect sentences in your writing. We could set up our tent under the tree. We could set it up over by the big rock. We could set up our tent under the tree, or we could set it up over by the big rock. 2 Using compound sentences will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to use compound sentences? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to use compound sentence? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. 39 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction. Use compound sentences. 1 2 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the relationship between the sentences. (circle) a Determine which coordinating conjunction to use. b Many sentences may have two correct choices. Explain your choice. 3 Rewrite the sentences as a compound sentence. Relationshi p 1. Olivia can watch the video with us. She can watch it at home , or Olivia can watch the video with us ___________ she

can watch it at home 2. Soccer is my favourite sport. I watch it whenever I can. Soccer is my favourite sport, so __________ I watch it whenever I can. Extended Thinking Which conjunction should be used to link the two clauses? Why? Could you use another conjunction to link the two clauses? Explain. Choice Result Compound Sentence SV, cSV Coordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) Choice Result and (addition) but, yet (difference/contrast) or (choice) so (result) nor (negative choice) as, for (reason) Jack will go first. Molly will be second. A. Jack will go first, or Molly will be second. Word Bank compound sentence B. Jack will go first, and Molly will be second. coordinating Summary Closure What did you learn today about using compound sentences? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. 40 conjunction clause 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction.

Use compound sentences. 1 2 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the relationship between the sentences. (circle) a Determine which coordinating conjunction to use. b Many sentences may have two correct choices. Explain your choice. 3 Rewrite the sentences as a compound sentence. Relationshi p 1. Mia loves to draw. She wants to become an illustrator of childrens books. , so Mia loves to draw ________________ she wants to become an illustrator of childrens books. 2. She draws charming animals and people. She plans to go to art school to learn about illustrating. , and She draws charming animals and people ______________ she plans to go to art school to learn illustrating. 3. Mia does all of the art for our class posters. , asShe is the best artist in the class. Mia does all of the art for our class posters _________ she is the best artist in the class 4. She will have to study to become even better. She is determined to succeed. , but She will have to study to become even Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 better _________________ she is determined to succeed. 41 Use compound sentences. Choice Result Compound Sentence SV, cSV Coordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) and (addition) but, yet (difference/contrast) Contrast or (choice) so (result) Addition nor (negative choice) as, for (reason) Negative Choice Reason Contrast

Addition 2014 All rights reserved. ndependent Practice (continued) Remember the Concept A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction. Use compound sentences. 1 2 Read the sentences carefully. Identify the relationship between the sentences. (circle) a Determine which coordinating conjunction to use. b Many sentences may have two correct choices. Explain your choice. 3 Rewrite the sentences as a compound sentence. Relationshi p 5. Noah collects rocks and minerals. He has many beautiful stones. , and Noah collects rocks and minerals__________________ he has many beautiful stones Contrast Compound Sentence Addition SV, cSV 6. He wanted to show everyone his collection. He brought it to school. He wanted to show everyone his collection ___________ he brought , so it to school. Choice 7. He displayed the crystals in a black case. He had labelled each one. , and He displayed the crystals in a black case __________________ he had labelled each one. 8. At first, Noah was upset it took so long to set up his display. Noah is proud of his collection. At first, Noah was upset it took so long to set up his display , but ___________ he is proud of his collection. 9. He doesnt mind the effort of setting up the display. He doesnt mind the time it takes. He doesnt mind the effort of setting up the display, nor does __________________ mind the time it takes. he Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. 42 Result Contrast Addition Coordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships)

and (addition) but, yet (difference/contrast) or (choice) so (result) nor (negative choice) as, for (reason) Contrast Addition Negative Choice Reason 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Rewrite the sentences as a compound sentence. Relationshi p 1. Cooper doesnt like rock climbing. He is afraid of heights. , as Cooper doesnt like rock climbing _____________ he is afraid of heights. Negative Choice 2. Paige loves to swim. She is also learning to surf. and Paige loves to swim,____________ she is also learning to surf. Contrast 3. We might go to the city for our holiday. We might go to the beach. ,or We might go to the city for our holiday _____________ we might go to the beach. A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction. Reason Addition Choice Result Extended Thinking Ethan wanted to use more variety in his sentences, so he tried to use some different conjunctions. Did changing the conjunction change the meaning of the sentences? Explain. A. The dog was hungry, so it whined at the door. B. The dog was hungry, or it whined at the door.

Yes, changing the conjunction changes the meaning of the sentences. Sentence A states that the dog whining was a result of its being hungry. Sentence B makes it a choice: either the dog was hungry or it was whining. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. 43 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Rewrite the sentences as a compound sentence. Relationshi p 1. Tara likes to build things. She built a treehouse in the big tree in her yard. , so Tara likes to build things ______________ she built a treehouse in the big tree in her yard. 2. The tree is very tall., She so uses a ladder to climb up. The tree is very tall ___________ she uses a ladder to climb up. 3. Next she is going to build a bookcase. She might build a doghouse for her dog. , or Next she is going to build a bookcase ___________ she might build a doghouse for her dog. A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction. Contrast Result Choice Result Choice Result Extended Thinking Max wanted to use more variety in his sentences, so he tried changing the order of the clauses in his sentences. Did changing the order of the clauses change the meaning of the sentences? Explain. Which order makes more sense to you? A. It was raining, so we brought our umbrellas. B. We brought our umbrellas, so it was raining. Yes, changing the conjunction changes the meaning of the sentences. Sentence A states that the rain was the cause of bringing our umbrellas, but sentence B states the cause of the rain was that we had brought our Australian Curriculum English umbrellas. Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. 44 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept

Relationshi p Rewrite the sentences as a compound sentence. 1. Andrew finished his book before lunch. He brought a new one with him, just in case. , but Andrew finished his book before lunch _________he brought a new one with him, just in case. 2. He loves to read. He always has a book with him. , so He loves to read ____________ he always has a book with him. 3. He likes exciting books with lots of action. He likes mysteries as well. , and He likes exciting books with lots of action ___________ he likes mysteries as well A compound sentence has two main clauses, separated by a coordinating conjunction. Contrast Addition Choice Result Contrast Addition Extended Thinking Holly was writing about her family. She isnt sure which conjunction to use to link her sentences. Which sentence do you think is correct? Explain. Holly has red hair. Her brother James has brown hair. A. Holly has red hair, so her brother James has brown hair. B. Holly has red hair, for her brother James has brown hair. C. Holly has red hair, but her brother James has brown hair. Sentences A and B imply a cause-and-effect relationship, either Hollys red hair caused James brown hair or the other way around. Sentence C is correct because it states the relationship as contrast: Hollys hair is red while James Australian Curriculum English hair is brown Year 5 Literacy 1704.7 Use compound sentences. 45 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will identify complex sentences. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELA 1507 Understand the difference between main and subordinate clauses and that complex sentence involves at least one subordinate clause. Embedded Content Descriptor: Prerequisite(s): Year 4 ACELY 1682 Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts demonstrating increasing control over text structures and language features and selecting print, and multimodal elements appropriate to the audience and purpose.

Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: Vocabulary Academic: Content: identify complex sentence, main clause, subordinate clause, subordinating conjunction, simple sentence, compound sentence Support: EDI Lesson Overview A46 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will identify1 complex sentences. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does identify mean? Identify means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge A simple sentence has a subject and a verb. Are these simple sentences? Hint: Label the verb (V) and the subject (S). S V 1. I went outside this morning. S V 2. The rain should stop soon. Make the Connection Students, you already know how to identify parts of a simple sentence. We will call this sentence a main clause. Now, we will use main clauses and subordinating conjunctions to identify complex sentences. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1507.1 Identify complex sentences. 46 find 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development A complex sentence is a sentence that has one main clause2 and one subordinate clause3 connected by a subordinating

conjunction4. The main clause has a subject and a verb (SV). The subordinate clause has a subject, a verb and a subordinating conjunction (cSV). Complex A short way of writing a complex sentence is cSV, SV or SV c SV Sentences Subordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) after, before, when, while, until (time) because, since, now that, as (cause & effect) although, though, even though, whereas, while (disagree; opposition) if, unless, only if, whether or not, even if, in case (condition; situation) c S V S Checking for Understanding What is the difference between the example and the non-example? Which sentence is a complex sentence? How do you know? A Since I started school, I have enjoyed reading. B Since Year 1, I have enjoyed reading. In your own words, what is a complex sentence? A complex sentence is _____. V After I ate breakfast, I went to visit my friend. (after time relationship) S V c S V I received good grades because I studied hard. (because cause and effect) Definitions 2 3 Not a Complex Sentence After breakfast, I went to visit my friend.

Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1507.1 Identify complex sentences. 4 47 (main clause) sentence that contains a subject and a verb and can stand alone (subordinate clause) thoughts that are not in a complete sentence and cannot stand alone (subordinating conjunction) a conjunction that begins a subordinate clause 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice A complex sentence is a sentence that has one main clause and one subordinate clause connected by a subordinating conjunction. Identify complex sentences. 1 2 3 Read the sentence carefully. Label the conjunction (c), the subject (S) and the verb (V). If it is a complex sentence, identify the type (circle) and the relationship (write). c S V S Cause & Effect V c S S V Time V S V c Opposition S V S 2 How did I/you recognise the subordinating conjunction, the subject and the verb? 3 How did I/you identify the type and the relationship? Subordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) after, before, when, while, until (time)

because, since, now that, as (cause & effect) although, though, even though, whereas, while (disagree; opposition) if, unless, only if, whether or not, even if, in case (condition; situation) c V S Condition V S S Checking for Understanding V V Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1507.1 Identify complex sentences. 48 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance A complex sentence is a sentence that has one main clause and one subordinate clause connected by a subordinating conjunction. 1 Identifying complex sentences will help you write better sentences. 1. I went to the shop. 2. I ate breakfast. Complex sentence: After I went to the shop, I ate breakfast. 2 Identifying complex sentences will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to identify complex sentences? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to identify complex sentences? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1507.1 Identify complex sentences. 49 2014 All rights reserved.

Skill Closure Remember the Concept Identify complex sentences. 1 2 3 Read the sentence carefully. Label the conjunction (c), the subject (S) and the verb (V). If it is a complex sentence, identify the type (circle) and the relationship (write). c S Subordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) V S Cause & Effect V S c S A complex sentence is a sentence that has one main clause and one subordinate clause connected by a subordinating conjunction. V Condition V after, before, when, while, until (time) because, since, now that, as (cause & effect) although, though, even though, whereas, while (disagree; opposition) if, unless, only if, whether or not, even if, in case (condition; situation) Extended Thinking Stanley thinks that the sentence below is a complex sentence. Do you agree with Stanley? Why or why not? After lunch, I walked to the library. I disagree with Stanley because the first clause does not have a subject or a verb.

main clause Summary Closure What did you learn today about identifying complex sentences? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1507.1 Identify complex sentences. Word Bank 50 verb subordinate clause subject subordinating conjunction 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Identify complex sentences. 1 2 3 Read the sentence carefully. Label the conjunction (c), the subject (S) and the verb (V). If it is a complex sentence, identify the type (circle) and the relationship (write). Type of Sentence S 1. The way of life for the c S V Indigenous people changed V after the British came to c S V Australia. cSV, SV S V 2. My dad is going to cry if his S V favourite team loses. cSV, SV SV c SV SV c SV cSV, SV SV c SV 5. As of today, she is the best c S V team.

player on our cSV, SV SV c SV cSV, SV SV c SV Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1507.1 Identify complex sentences. after, before, when, while, until (time) because, since, now that, as (cause & effect) although, though, even though, whereas, while (disagree; opposition) if, unless, only if, whether or not, even if, in case (condition; situation) SV c SV cSV, SV after lunch. Subordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) Opposition V S 4. Because the day was too hot, all V melting. the ice creamSwas S 6. Denise will walk to the park Time Condition c S V 3. Dolphins have cone-shaped teeth while porpoises have flat c S teeth. V or spade-shaped Relationship A complex sentence is a sentence that has one main

clause and one subordinate clause connected by a subordinating conjunction. 51 Cause & Effect 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 c S Remember the Concept V S S Time Subordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) V S c cS V V Opposition V S c V Condition after, before, when, while, until (time) because, since, now that, as (cause & effect) although, though, even though, whereas, while (disagree; opposition) if, unless, only if, whether or not, even if, in case (condition; situation) V S

S A complex sentence is a sentence that has one main clause and one subordinate clause connected by a subordinating conjunction. Cause & Effect V Extended Thinking Martin wants to combine these two sentences into a complex sentence. Which conjunction should he use? Then write the complex sentence below. Martin assembled his model plane. He played with it. A. and B. nor C. before D. yet ___________________________________________________________________ Martin assembled his model plane before he played with Australian it. Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1507.1 Identify complex sentences. 52 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept S V c S S c S c S Cause & Effect V V V V Time S V Condition A complex sentence is a sentence that has one main clause and one subordinate clause connected by a subordinating conjunction.

Subordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) after, before, when, while, until (time) because, since, now that, as (cause & effect) although, though, even though, whereas, while (disagree; opposition) if, unless, only if, whether or not, even if, in case (condition; situation) Extended Thinking Martin wants to combine these two sentences into a complex sentence. Which conjunction should he use? Then write the complex sentence below. Martin guzzled coffee. He was hyper. A. and B. but C. so D. because ___________________________________________________________________ Because Martin guzzled coffee, he was hyper. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1507.1 Identify complex sentences. 53 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 c S V Remember the Concept V c S Condition A complex sentence is a sentence that has one main clause and one subordinate clause connected by a subordinating conjunction. Subordinating Conjunctions and (Relationships) S V Extended Thinking Martin wants to combine these two sentences into a complex

sentence. Which conjunction should he use? Then write the complex sentence below. Martin exaggerated his story. No one believed him. A. since B. or C. nor D. for Since Martin exaggerated his story, no one believed him. ___________________________________________________________________ after, before, when, while, until (time) because, since, now that, as (cause & effect) although, though, even though, whereas, while (disagree; opposition) if, unless, only if, whether or not, even if, in case (condition; situation) Martin wants to combine these two sentences into a complex sentence. Which conjunction should he use? Then write the complex sentence below. Martin was nominated as class captain. Tess was not. A. nor B. whereas C. yet D. for Martin was nominated as class captain whereas Tess was ___________________________________________________________________ Australian Curriculum English not. Year 5 Language 1507.1 Identify complex sentences. 54 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY 1698 Show how ideas and points of view in texts are conveyed through the use of vocabulary, including idiomatic expressions, objective and subjective language, and that these can change according to context. Embedded Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY 1702 Navigate and read texts for specific purposes applying appropriate text processing strategies, for example predicting and confirming, monitoring meaning, skimming and scanning. Prerequisite(s): Special Instructions: Vocabulary Academic:

Content: convey, identify, interpret idiom, phrase, literal, context clues Support: EDI Lesson Overview A55 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will explain how idioms convey1 ideas and opinions. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does convey mean? Convey means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge 1. My new scooter cost an arm and a leg. 2. While hiking, I slipped on some rocks and cut my arm and leg. Make the Connection Students, which of the sentences refers to an actual arm and a leg? (Pair-Share) Did the person really pay an arm and a leg for a scooter? Students, authors sometimes use groups of words with a special meaning to be more descriptive. We call these groups of words idioms. Now we will explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1698.1 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. 55 communicate 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development An idiom is a phrase2 that has a special meaning different from the literal3 meaning of its words. Context clues4 can be used to determine the meaning of the idiom. Idioms Idiom used in a sentence The meaning of an idiom After crashing his Dads car, Up a gum tree means you are Robert was definitely up a gum in trouble or in a big mess. tree. Janice says that her new

baby is the apple of her eye. The apple of someones eye is someone who is cherished or loved. Checking for Understanding Why is apple of her eye an example of an idiom? Explain your answer. Which example below has an idiom? How do you know? A It is raining cats and dogs. The entire street is flooded with water. B I have many cats and dogs. In your own words, what is an idiom? An idiom is _______________. Not Examples of Idioms: The tree was perfect for climbing. An apple is a healthy snack. Definitions 2 3 4 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1698.1 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. 56 group of words basic meaning (context clues) nearby words 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice An idiom is a phrase that has a special meaning different from the literal meaning of its words. Context clues can be used to determine the meaning of the idiom. Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. 1 Read the sentence with the bolded idiom. a Identify5 the context clues that help determine its meaning. (underline) 2 Determine the meaning of the idiom. (circle) 3 Interpret6 the sentence. Reread the sentence replacing the bolded idiom with its meaning. 1. I didnt come down in the last shower. You cant trick me that easily. A caught in the rain B stuck in a bottle C playing a joke C very angry B skipping class C only attracted to one person C received a good grade B liquid in a bottle C expert or very knowledgeable

Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1698.1 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. How did I/you identify the context clues? 2 How did I/you determine the meaning of the idiom? 3 How did I/you interpret the sentence? 4. I had to stay home from school today because I got the wog. A sick with a cold or flu B annoyed with someone 5. Robert is great with technology and teaches a computer class. Hes the full bottle. A not good with computers 1 2. After losing the rugby match, the team was as upset as a hornet in a bottle. A stinging each other B not foolish 3. Tara loves her boyfriend and she only has eyes for him. A stare at someone Checking for Understanding 6. Without any rain, the desert was as dry as a wooden god. A made from wood B very dry area C place to pray 57 Definitions 5 6 find explain 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) What is the difference between the sentences below? Explain your answer. Idiom: Shell be apples (everything will be all right) 1. No worries, mate! Everything will turn out just fine. 2. No worries, mate! Shell be apples! Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you determine what the question or prompt is asking? 2 How did I/you determine the relevant information? 3 How did I/you answer the question? 4 How did I/you determine if all parts of the question have been answered?

The use of the idiom makes the sentence more interesting to the ___________________________________________________________________________ reader. Sentence #2 also sounds more friendly. ___________________________________________________________________________ __ Idiom: Touch wood (avoiding bad luck) Application 1. Im so lucky I havent caught that flu that is going around. 2. Im so lucky I havent caught the flu that is going around - touch wood. Write a sentence using one of the idioms from above. Dont worry about the T: _________________________________ The use of the idiom sounds more hopeful that the speaker does ___________________________________________________________________________ not get sick. ___________________________________________________________________________ weather ruining the party. ___________________________________ S:Shell _________________________________ be apples! ___________________________________ __ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1698.1 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. 58 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance An idiom is a phrase that has a special meaning different from the literal meaning of its words. Context clues can be used to determine the meaning of the idiom. 1 Explaining how idioms convey ideas and opinions will help you understand what a speaker or writer is trying to describe. Everyone knows the surprise party is on Friday. Someone let the cat out of the bag! There was not an actual cat let out of a bag; instead, it means that someone told about the surprise before it happened. 2 Explaining how idioms convey ideas and opinions will help you do well on tests. Understanding the Relevance Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1698.1 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. 59 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure

Remember the Concept Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. 1 Read the sentence with the bolded idiom. a Identify the context clues that help determine its meaning. (underline) 2 Determine the meaning of the idiom. (circle) 3 Interpret the sentence. Reread the sentence replacing the bolded idiom with its meaning. 1. My teacher said to stop mucking around and finish my school work. A picking up bugs B wasting time C laughing out loud An idiom is a phrase that has a special meaning different from the literal meaning of its words. Context clues can be used to determine the meaning of the idiom. 2. Sarah is a great sales person and wins over all of our clients. She can talk the legs off an iron pot. A a really good cook B able to talk someone into something C loud and chatty Extended Thinking Kiras mum said, Belt up! Please dont wake the sleeping baby! What did her mum really mean? Explain your answer. Kiras mum wants her to be quiet. Belt up means to keep your mouth shut. Word Bank idiom Summary Closure context clues literal explain What did you learn today about explaining how idioms convey ideas and opinions? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1698.1 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. 60 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. 1

Read the sentence with the bolded idiom. a Identify the context clues that help determine its meaning. (underline) 2 Determine the meaning of the idiom. (circle) 3 Interpret the sentence. Reread the sentence replacing the bolded idiom with its meaning. 1. Jack took a sickie and went surfing instead of going to work. A taking time off without being sick B sick with the flu C curing a flu by surfing 3. Lola was in love and could not focus on her work; she was away with the pixies. A ignoring other people B dreaming C falling in love 5. Greta was tired of being on the wallaby track, and started looking for a job. A too busy B unemployed C chasing wallabies Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1698.1 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. An idiom is a phrase that has a special meaning different from the literal meaning of its words. Context clues can be used to determine the meaning of the idiom. 2. After the huge fight with his brother, Brian was mad as a cut snake. A very angry B slithered like a snake C bit his brother 4. My brother is in the dog house after he broke the tv and made our mum mad. A steal the dogs house B to be in trouble C to spend time outside 6. Stone the crows! I cant believe my family planned a huge surprise party for my birthday! A throwing rocks B shocked or surprised C angry crows 61 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Select the correct meaning for each bolded idiom. 1. Paul spat the dummy when he heard his favourite team had lost again. A bought match tickets B lost his temper C got excited 3. Its not cricket to make the students do schoolwork on a holiday. A not liking bugs B unfair or unreasonable

C nice and simple 2. The two boys did not get along. They could be heard having a blue outside the classroom. An idiom is a phrase that has a special meaning different from the literal meaning of its words. Context clues can be used to determine the meaning of the idiom. A an argument or fight B sharing food C trading blue jeans 4. The mobile phone bill is late and needs to be paid on the knocker. A do something immediately B ask for help C wait until later Idiom Bank Fight like cat and dog: frequently fighting Extended Thinking Use the idiom bank to match the pictures to the idiom they best represent. Happy little vegemite: happy person Feeling blue: very sad Work like a dog: work very hard Go and have a cuppa _________________ Feeling blue _________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1698.1 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. Fight like cat and dog _________________ 62 Go and have a cuppa: have a cup of tea or coffee 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Select the correct meaning for each bolded idiom. 1. Janie told her little sister to keep her nose out of other peoples business. 2. The painter was mad as a cut snake when the dog knocked over the paint can. A blow her nose B do not interfere

C ask a lot of questions 3. We took an early mark from the library and went to go see a movie instead. An idiom is a phrase that has a special meaning different from the literal meaning of its words. Context clues can be used to determine the meaning of the idiom. A afraid of snakes B feeling silly C very angry 4. The news that Kevins sister was going to run for council knocked his socks off! A to tick, or write on an item B leave early from something C stay late after everyone else A annoyed B impressed or shocked C take your socks off Extended Thinking Partner A: Act out or use some of the following idioms in a sentence. Partner B: Before the answers are revealed try to guess the idioms meaning. Hold your tongue (dont say anything, be quiet) Pull someones leg (tell a fib or small lie) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1698.1 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. Keep your fingers crossed (to hope for good luck) My hats off to you (to admire what someone has done) 63 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept Select the correct meaning for each bolded idiom. 1. It was a long, tough day at school. Im completely knackered. A ready for exercise B exhausted or very tired C missing home 2. Stop mucking around and get back to work! Your work is due today. An idiom is a phrase that has a special meaning different from the literal meaning of its words. Context clues can be used to determine the meaning of the idiom.

A hunting for bugs B a card game C wasting time Extended Thinking Use context clues to explain the meaning of the idioms in the passages below. Jasons teacher said, Be sure to pack everything you need for our camping trip. There will not be any place to stop for supplies. Were going camping 50kms south of Woop Woop. What did his teacher really mean? Explain your answer. Jasons teacher means they are going camping in the middle of ____________________________________________________________________________ nowhere, so they need to be prepared. ____________________________________________________________________________ Sami told her family, We should wait and see which way the cat jumps before we move. Maybe we can stay here if I can find a new job. What did Sami really mean? Explain your answer. Sami wants to wait before making an important decision to ____________________________________________________________________________ see how things develop. ____________________________________________________________________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1698.1 Explain how idioms convey ideas and opinions. 64 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will use figurative language. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELT 1611 Understand, interpret and experiment with sound devices and imagery, including simile, metaphor, personification, in narratives, shape poetry, songs, anthems, odes. Embedded Content Descriptor: Prerequisite(s): Year 2 ACELA 1468 Understand that nouns represent people, places, concrete objects and abstract concepts; that there are three types of nouns: common, proper and pronouns; and that noun groups/phrases can be expanded using articles and adjectives. Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: This symbol denotes the recommendation to proceed to Skill Development after teaching part of the Concept Development. This teaching strategy is referred to as looping. Click on the symbol to be sent to the correct location in the lesson. Year 5 ACELT 1611 has been split into six objectives that dig deeper into the types of figurative language students will come across in literature. This objective addresses using various types of figurative language and applying the concepts learned in earlier lessons. Vocabulary Academic: literal Content: figurative language, simile, metaphor, imagery, hyperbole Support: vivid, pillar EDI Lesson

Overview A65 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will use figurative language. Read the learning objective to your partner. Activate Prior Knowledge Read the following passages. Jerome was lost in the desert. There was no road or town in sight. He had a map, but it was useless without a landmark. Jerome was lost in the desert. The land was an empty moonscape. The emptiness stretched for millions of kilometres in every direction. Without any recognisable landmarks, his map was as much use to him as a bicycle to a fish. Which passage creates a more interesting picture of Jeromes situation? (Pair-Share) Make the Connection Students, you already know how authors use figurative language to create a picture in your mind. Now we are going to use figurative language to add interest to our writing. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. 65 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal1 meaning. To make their work more interesting, authors use figurative language such as similes, metaphors, imagery and hyperbole. compares two unlike things using as or like My love is like the red, red rose. Her face was as red as a beetroot. Metapho r describes something unfamiliar by comparing it to something familiar Becky is a lightning bolt on the running track.

Imagery uses vivid2 words that create a picture in the readers mind In the rock pool, the anemones bloomed like garden flowers, their tentacle petals swaying in the currents. deliberately describes something as much more or less than it actually is. It took me less than a second to decide I did not like the song. Hyperbol e Which is a simile? A Thomas is very tall. B She is a breath of fresh air. Checking for Understanding 2 B He was a shining star. Go to Skill Dev 2 Checking for Understanding 3 Which is an example of imagery? A The music was loud. Go to Skill Dev 3 B The music thundered and crashed. Checking for Understanding 4 Which is an example of hyperbole? Go to Skill Dev 4 A That dress is expensive. B That dress cost a million dollars. Definitions 1 2 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6

Use figurative language. Go to Skill Dev 1 Thomas is as tall as a tree. Which is a metaphor? A He was important. Figurative Language Simile Checking for Understanding 1 66 actual meaning of the words produces a clear image in the mind 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice 1 Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal meaning. To make their work more interesting, authors use figurative language such as similes. Use similes. 1 2 Read the sentence beginning. Add an appropriate simile from the list to complete the sentence. (write) a There can be more than one correct choice for each sentence. Be prepared to explain your choice (Answers will vary. There is more than one possibility for each sentence) D or 1. Brian runs B, __________. F Checking for Understanding 2 How did I/you add a simile to complete the sentence? A simile compares two unlike things using as or like. A. like a wall of water. B. like a speeding train. C or E 2. Lolas smile is __________. C. as warm as sunshine. 3. He drove the ball toward the goal B, D or F __________. D. as fast as a bullet. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. Write a sentence using a simile. You may use one from the list above or create your own. The rain came down like a

T: waterfall. __________________________________________ ____________________________________________ S: E. as bright as the sun. A, __________. B or F 4. The wave rose over the surfers Application F. like a charging __________________________________________ ____________________________________________ Back to Concept Dev elephant. 67 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice 2 Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal meaning. To make their work more interesting, authors use figurative language such as metaphors. Use metaphors. 1 2 Checking for Understanding Read the sentence beginning. Add an appropriate metaphor from the list to complete the sentence. (write) a There can be more than one correct choice for each sentence. Be prepared to explain your choice (Answers will vary. There is more than one possibility for each sentence) C or E 1. Patricia is so smart, that shes ____________. A. a bolt of lightning. 2 How did I/you add a metaphor to complete the sentence? A metaphor describes something unfamiliar by comparing it to something familiar. B. the key to our winning. B or F 2. Brian is a great player. He is___________. C. a human computer. Application Write a sentence using a metaphor. You may use one from the list above or create your own. T: The rain was a solid wall of A or D 3. The charging crocodile was ___________. D. a deadly bullet.

water pouring down. __________________________________________ ____________________________________________ S: E. a walking dictionary. A, B or 4. The game-winning goal was __________. D Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. F. the pillar of the team. 68 __________________________________________ ____________________________________________ Back to Concept Dev 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice 3 Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal meaning. To make their work more interesting, authors use figurative language such as imagery. Use imagery. 1 2 Checking for Understanding Read the sentence. Rewrite the sentence using imagery to make it more interesting. 2 How did I/you rewrite the sentence using imagery to make it more interesting? 1. My grandmothers face is lined and wrinkled. ___________________________________________________________________________ My grandmothers face is creased and lined like paper that has ___________________________________________________________________________ been folded over and over again. (Answers vary.) __ Imagery uses vivid words that create a picture in the readers mind. Application 2. The surface of the water reflected the sunlight. ___________________________________________________________________________ The surface of the water glittered and sparkled in the sunlight. ___________________________________________________________________________ (Answers vary.) __ Write a sentence using imagery to describe something with sensory details. T: The old tractor puffed and chugged its dusty way across __________________________________________ the field. ____________________________________________ S:

3. When she thought about giving the speech, she felt nervous. ___________________________________________________________________________ When she thought about giving the speech, her heart began to ___________________________________________________________________________ race, her palms began to sweat and she became dizzy and __ breathless. (Answers vary.) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. 69 __________________________________________ ____________________________________________ Back to Concept Dev 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice 4 Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal meaning. To make their work more interesting, authors use figurative language such as hyperbole. Use hyperbole. 1 2 Checking for Understanding Read the sentence. Use hyperbole to complete the sentence.(write) 2 How did I/you use hyperbole to complete the sentence? 1. He was afraid it would take him _______________________ to finish the until next Christmas project. (Answers vary) Hyperbole deliberately describes something as much more or less than it actually is. 2. We have been waiting ______________________________________to get forever (Answers vary) tickets. Application Write a sentence using hyperbole. the ground shook and birds fell out of 3. The band played so loud ______________________________________________. the sky (Answers vary) T: I am so tired I could sleep for a year. __________________________________________ ____________________________________________ 4. The fog was so thick it smothered the town like a large wool jumper (Answers vary) _____________________________________________________. S: __________________________________________ ____________________________________________

5. Last summer it was so hot the rocks caught fire (Answers vary) ________________________________________________. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. 70 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Checking for Understanding Compare the sentence pairs below. Which one is more interesting to read? Why? A. Amanda quickly tidied the room by picking up the clothes and toys. B. Amanda was a whirlwind, dashing around the room and scooping up clothes and toys into her arms. 1 How did I/you determine what the question or prompt is asking? 2 How did I/you determine the relevant information? 3 How did I/you answer the question? 4 How did I/you determine if all parts of the question have been answered? A simile compares two unlike things using as or like. A metaphor describes something unfamiliar by comparing it to something familiar. Imagery uses vivid words that create a picture in the readers mind. B I think sentence ________ is more interesting to read because: it creates a picture of Amanda as a whirlwind. _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. 71 Hyperbole deliberately describes something as much more or less than it actually is. 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal meaning.

To make their work more interesting, authors use figurative language such as similes, metaphors, imagery and hyperbole. 1 Using figurative language will help you write more interesting sentences and paragraphs. The principal walked slowly to the front of the stage. His footsteps sounded loud on the wood floor. The principal walked to the front of the stage, each step sounding like the slow beat of drum. 2 Using figurative language will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to use figurative language? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to use figurative language? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. 72 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Use figurative language. 1 2 Read the sentence. Add appropriate figurative language from the list to complete the sentence. (write) B 1. Her eyes were ________________. A. like a missile. A 2. He threw the stone _________________. C 3. The little girl skipped __________________. B. sparkling stars. C. as lightly as a fairy. Extended Thinking Compare the sentences below. Which simile creates a clear picture? A. Like a flash of light, the runner crossed the finish line metres ahead of her nearest rival. B. Like a flash of light, the tired soldier plodded wearily towards the tent. C. Like a flash of light, the mother lovingly tucked the child into bed. Write a sentence that explains why one of the other similes does not create a clear picture. Sentence C is not clear because a flash of light would be very fast ___________________________________________________________________________________________ and sudden, and that does not describe how a mother would tuck a ___________________________________________________________________________________________ child into bed. Summary Closure What did you learn today about using figurative language? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language.

73 Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal meaning. To make their work more interesting, authors use figurative language such as similes, metaphors, imagery and hyperbole. A simile compares two unlike things using as or like. A metaphor describes something unfamiliar by comparing it to something familiar. Imagery uses vivid words that create a picture in the readers mind. Hyperbole deliberately describes something as much more or less than it actually is. Word Bank figurative language simile metaphor imagery hyperbole 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Use figurative language. 1 2 Complete the sentences using one of the figurative language techniques. (write) Identify the figurative technique you used. (write) 1. Friendship is an anchor for our lives. (metaphor) ______________________________________________________________ 2. The sun came up like toast from a toaster. (simile) ________________________________________________________ 3. He ran with his feet pounding dust from the ground and his ___________________________________________________________________ breath puffing in hard, panting gasps. (imagery) 4. The dancer twirled and jumped as weightless as air. ______________________________________________________________ (simile/hyperbole) 5. The birds gossiped and chattered in the tree like a bunch of _________________________________________________________________ grandmothers. (simile) Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal meaning. To make their work more interesting, authors use

figurative language such as similes, metaphors, imagery and hyperbole. A simile compares two unlike things using as or like. A metaphor describes something unfamiliar by comparing it to something familiar. Imagery uses vivid words that create a picture in the readers mind. Hyperbole deliberately describes something as much more or less than it actually is. 6. The beach curved in a golden crescent against the deep green ______________________________________________________________ sea. (imagery) 7. The children drank a river of cordial. (hyperbole) _____________________________________________________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. 74 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Rewrite the sentence using a figurative expression such as a simile, (Answers vary) metaphor, imagery or hyperbole. Identify the type of expression you used. 1. He was very sleepy.He felt sleep try to pull him under like a rip current towing a swimmer out to sea. (simile) ______________________________________________________ 2. The rain was cold. The rain came down in icy drips, chilling and soaking him to the bone. (imagery) ________________________________________________________ Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal meaning. To make their work more interesting, authors use figurative language such as similes, metaphors, imagery and hyperbole. 3. They had to walk a long way. They had to walk halfway across the continent. (hyperbole) _____________________________________________ The children were a cage of twittering 4. The children were talking loudly.birds. (metaphor) __________________________________________ Extended Thinking Read the passage below and complete the sentence using hyperbole. (Answers vary) Olivia was walking to school. It was hot walking along the Hyperbole deliberately

describes something as much more or less than it actually is. road. The hot air made heat waves over the bitumen. Olivia cook thought it was hot enough to a sausage on the footpath ________________________________________. Pair-Share with a partner how you completed the sentence. Did your partner complete the sentence differently? Which sentence do you like better? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. 75 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept 1. Tasha worked on her maths work. 2. She had a hard time figuring out some of the problems. 3. She knew maths was an important subject, so she kept at it until the problems were all complete. 4. When she was done, she felt proud of Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal meaning. To make their work more interesting, authors use figurative language such as similes, metaphors, imagery and hyperbole. herself. Choose one sentence from the passage and rewrite it using figurative (Answers vary) language. _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ __ Find a partner who chose the same sentence. Extended Thinking Compare your sentences and the images they create. Andrew and William were completing sentences using similes. like the sun coming out after a week of rain. Andrew wrote: When she smiled she looked like a hungry shark spotting its next meal. William wrote: When she smiled she looked Explain the image that one of the boys created in his sentence. Andrews sentence creates the image of a warm and ________________________________________________________________________________________ welcoming smile. ________________________________________________________________________________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. 76 2014 All rights reserved.

Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept Similes and metaphors use comparison to create an image in the readers mind. Think about comparisons you could make between people you know and other things. 1. Choose a person from the first list and a thing from the second.(Answers vary) an old a rock I compared _______________ to _________________. woman 2. Write a simile or metaphor expressing the comparison. The old woman was a rock, her face aged and weathered _________________________________________________________________________ _by time, but still strong. Extended Thinking _________________________________________________________________________ Timothy wants to add some figurative language to his writing. He wrote _ the following sentences to describe the small town he lives in. Which sentence should he use? Why? (Answers vary) A. My town sits at the foot of the hills like a egg in a nest. Figurative language refers to words and phrases that go beyond their literal meaning. To make their work more interesting, authors use figurative language such as similes, metaphors, imagery and hyperbole. Person Thing an old woman a child a big man a pretty girl rock monkey flower tree bird B. My town is an egg plain and brown on the outside, but with a secret treasure inside. C. My town is so small people have to drive through it twice before they notice it. D. My town has dusty red streets and tiny faded houses that are the same colour as the dirt. I like sentence A because of the image of the town being sheltered by the hills. _________________________________________________________________________ _ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1611.6 Use figurative language. 77 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will recognise different ways to start sentences.

Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELA 1505 Understand that the starting point of a sentence gives prominence to the message in the text and allows for prediction of how the text will unfold. Embedded Content Descriptor: Prerequisite(s): Understand the structure of simple sentences. The students need to be able to identify nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives. Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: Vocabulary Academic: recognise Content: noun, adjective, pronoun, connective Support: severity, frequency, arsonists, toucans, cast, curtain call EDI Lesson Overview A78 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will recognise1 different ways to start sentences. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does recognse mean? Recognise means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge Which is more interesting, A or B? Why? (Pair-Share). Use your whiteboard. Which underlined word is a noun? A pronoun? An adjective? A. They played in the rain. B. Tom and Stephanie played in the drizzling rain. Make the Connection Students you already know how to identify nouns, pronouns and adjectives. Today, we will use this skill to recognise different ways to start sentences. Definitions 1

Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 78 know something when you see it 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives, or connectives. Different Ways to Start a Sentence Type of sentence starter Noun: Mary, father, school, shop Definition A word that names a person, place or thing. Example Snakes are reptiles. Checking for Understanding Which of the following sentences starts with a noun? How do you know? A It runs. B Tom runs. C Young Tom runs. Which of the following sentences starts with a pronoun? How do you know? A They sing. B The egg basket is full. C A dog swims. Which of the following sentences starts with an adjective? How do you know? A She cried for a long time. Pronoun: he, she, it, they, everyone, we, you A word that takes the place of a noun. They have scales and

no legs. Adjective: red, two, little, happy, many, all A word that describes a noun. Many snakes are poisonous. Connective: however, first, then, finally, A word or phrase daily, next, also, that links two both, therefore, ideas. besides, Australian Curriculumamong, English Year 5 Language 1505.1 before Recognise different ways to start a sentence. B Penny wrote a book. C Fuzzy puppies are fun. Which of the following sentences starts with a connective? How do you know? However, in Australia they are protected. 79 A First, finish your dinner. B The pencil is red. C Father cleans. In your own words, what are the different ways to start a sentence? The different ways to start a sentence are _____________. 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives, or connectives. Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 1 2 Checking for Understanding Read the sentence. Identify the sentence starter. (label N, P, A or C)

2 How did I/you identify the nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives? N 1. Elanora called her sister. Type of Sentence Starter Noun P They talked for a long time. Mary, father, school, shop A Two hours went by before they hung up. C Then, they went to the caf for supper. Pronoun he, she, it, they, everyone, we, you Adjective red, two, little, happy, many, all Connective A 2. however, first, then, finally, daily Cold and dry weather is awful. N The birds were too cold to even fly. P They sat in the tree all day. C Eventually, they warmed up and moved on. 3. P She wanted to learn to dance. N Bec learned by practising one step at a time. C Next, she found a partner and went dancing. A Popular music makes you want to dance more. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence.

80 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives, or connectives. Recognise different ways to start a sentence. Checking for Understanding 1 Read the sentence pairs. 2 Identify the noun sentence starter. (circle) 3 Replace the noun with a pronoun. (write) 1. 2 How did I/you identify the noun sentence starter? 3 How did I/you replace the noun with a pronoun? Koorine threw the apples down to her brother. __________ Shethrew the apples down to her brother. 2. Dogs play down by the river in the summer. Type of Sentence Starter Noun Mary, father, school, shop Pronoun he, she, it, they, everyone, we, you __________ play down by the river in the summer. They 3. Richard had a flat tyre on his bike. __________ He had a flat tyre. 4. Sam and I play on the same team. __________ We play on the same team. 5. The spider terrified Kevin. __________ It terrified Kevin. 6. Jeremy, bring us the receipt after you go shopping. __________ Youbring us the receipt after you go shopping. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 81 2014 All rights reserved.

kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives, or connectives. Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 1 2 1. Checking for Understanding Read the sentence pairs. Identify the adjective sentence starter. (circle) 2 How did I/you identify the adjective sentence starter? Red-haired Hudson should change his shoes. Hudson should change his shoes. 2. Type of Sentence Starter Adjective red, two, little, happy, many, all Music was heard in the park. Guitar music was heard in the park. 3. Fans watched the soccer game. Cheering fans watched the soccer game. 4. Chocolate cake and ice cream are good for dessert. Cake and ice cream are good for dessert. 5. Rob and the cat got into a fight. Clumsy Rob and the cat got into a fight. Application 6. Eight large stones blocked the road. Stones blocked the road. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 82 Pair-Share another adjective that could be used in the sentence. How does that change the meaning of the sentence? 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives, or connectives. Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 1 2

1. Checking for Understanding Read the sentence pairs. Identify the connective sentence starter. (circle) 2 How did I/you identify the connective sentence starter? Hudson should change his shoes. Maybe, Hudson should change his shoes. 2. Type of Sentence Starter Connective however, first, then, both, finally, daily The music played in the park. Daily, the music played in the park. 3. We watched the soccer game. Finally, we watched the soccer game. 4. Both cake and ice cream are good for dessert. Cake and ice cream are good for dessert. 5. The dog and cat got into a fight. Later, the dog and cat got into a fight. Application 6. You will clean your room. Pair-Share another connective that could be used in the sentence. How does that change the meaning of the sentence? Next, you will clean your room. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 83 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Checking for Understanding Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 1 2 1 Read the text. Answer the questions Butterflies 1. Butterflies start their lives as larvae in eggs. 2.

Caterpillars hatch from eggs and eat leaves or flowers. 3. They moult (lose their skin) as they grow. 4. They turn into pupae (chrysalis). 5. This is where the larvae change to butterflies. 6. Adults emerge. 7. There is no growth during this stage and butterflies have a very short life. 8. They lay their eggs, and new life begins. How did I/you determine what the question or prompt is asking? 2 How did I/you determine the relevant information? 3 How did I/you answer the question? 4 How did I/you determine if all parts of the question have been answered? 64 words 1. In sentence two, replace caterpillars with a pronoun. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. They hatch from eggs and eat leaves or flowers. 2. In sentence five, add a connective before this. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. So this is where the larvae change to butterflies. 3. In sentence six, add an adjective to adults. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. Beautiful adults emerge. 4. In sentence seven, add a connective to they. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. Then, they lay their eggs, and new life begins. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 84 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives, or connectives. 1 Recognising different ways to start sentences will make your writing more interesting and guide the reader. Rain fell for over an hour. (noun) It fell for over an hour. (pronoun) Misty rain fell for over an hour. (adjective) Later, the rain stopped and the sun came out. (connective) 2 Recognising different ways to start sentences will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to recognise different ways to start sentences? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to recognise different ways to start sentences? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence.

85 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives. Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 1 2 Read the sentence. Identify the sentence starter. (label N, P, A or C) A Food Web P 1. Most plants and animals eat or are eaten. 2. They transfer N energy from one to another as each animal eats another animal. C 3. Energy flows from one to another in the form of food. 4. Type of Sentence Starter Noun Mary, father, school, shop Pronoun he, she, it, they, everyone, we, you A However, there are many types of food chains in nature. 5. Planteating animals are eaten by meat-eating animals in a predator- Adjective red, two, little, happy, many, all Connective however, first, then, finally, daily prey food chain. 57 words Extended Thinking Read the sentence, paying attention to the bold word. After looking at the picture, Pair-Share a word you would use to describe the bold noun. What does your word describe about the noun? Windmills produce large amounts of electricity. Answers will vary. (tall, massive, huge, grey, whirling, etc.) Summary Closure What did you learn today about recognising different ways to start a sentence? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence.

86 Word Bank sentences meaning variety follow noun pronoun adjective connective 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives. Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 1 2 Read the passage. Identify the sentence starter. (label N, P, A or C) N Bushfires A 1. Bushfires in Australia occur all year-round. 2. Fire seasons are Type of Sentence Starter Noun grouped into years such as 2006-2007 Australian bushfire season. P Mary, father, school, shop C Pronoun 3. They run from June until May the next year. 4. To begin with, he, she, it, they, everyone, we, you Adjective Southeast Australian bushfires are most common and most severe red, two, little, happy, many, all A Connective during summer and autumn and in dry years. 5. Northern and however, first, then, finally, daily A Southwest Australia have bushfires during the dry season and fire severity1 tends to be more associated with seasonal weather N patterns. 6. The frequency2 of fire in the north is difficult to

C measure, as most fires are caused by human activity. 7. However, lightning strikes are as common a cause as human-caused P fires. N 8. Arsonists3 place people and property at serious risk. 9. They 1 are especially dangerous on extreme fire weather days. 2 113 words Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 87 Definitions 3 the extent to which something is bad the number of times something happens a person who sets fires on purpose 2014 All rights reserved. ndependent Practice (continued) Remember the Concept The Missing Jacket 1. Marty lost his jacket at school. 2. Marty asked his teacher if she would let him look for it. 3. Marty looked around the classroom. 4. The jacket was also not on the playground. 5. Marty looked in the office and in the canteen. 6. He did not find his jacket. 7. He knew he had worn it to school. 55 words Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives. Type of Sentence Starter Noun Mary, father, school, shop Pronoun he, she, it, they, everyone, we, you Adjective Word Bank missing he later Marty they happy red, two, little, happy, many, all Connective however, first, then, finally, daily 1. In sentence two, replace Marty with a pronoun. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. He asked his teacher if she would let him look for it.

2. In sentence four, add an adjective to jacket. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. The missing jacket was also not on the playground. 3. In sentence five, add a connective to the sentence. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. Later, Marty looked in the office and in the canteen. 4. In sentence seven, replace He with a noun. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. Marty knew he had worn it to school. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 88 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives. 1. C However, after the snow fell, the winter countryside was beautiful. N Spring is when flowers start to bloom. A Bright orange leaves cover the trees in autumn. P They will fall off the trees as winter approaches. 2. A Ordinary people didnt use umbrellas until the 17th and 18th century. N Umbrellas were first used by the Egyptians and Greeks. P They were used to protect people from sun and rain. C Also, in Malaysia, fancy umbrellas are used to show who is royal. 3. N Mums give their children food, shelter and love.

P They allow their children to make mistakes. A Hardworking mums are a good example to their children. C Yet, they make time to have fun with their children. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 89 2014 All rights reserved. Extended Thinking Remember the Concept Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives. 1. Which word starts this sentence correctly? _____ are like sleeping giants. A Toucans1 C Volcanoes B Ferns D Rivers 2. Which word starts this sentence correctly? _____ many years of not being alive, they awaken. A Before C Since B After Type of Sentence Starter Noun Mary, father, school, shop D But Pronoun he, she, it, they, everyone, we, you 3. Which word starts this sentence correctly? _____ volcanoes cause big damage as they come alive. A Most C Little B All D Noisy Adjective red, two, little, happy, many, all Connective however, first, then, finally, daily 4. Which word starts this sentence correctly? _____ in 70 A.D., 20 feet of ash covered the city of Pompeii. A Where

C Also B Maybe D For example 5. Which word starts this sentence correctly? _____ homes and bodies of people lay under the ash. A Happy C New B Preserved D Chilly 6. Which word starts this sentence correctly? _____ are learning about how people lived in the past. A He C It B She Definitions D We Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 1 90 South American birds 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives. P 1. She climbed the apple tree. C Soon, she picked some apples. N Koorine threw the apples down to her brother. A One step at a time, she climbed down. N 2. Richard couldnt go bike riding.

P He had a flat tyre. C Also, the handlebars were loose. A Angry, he chose to spend the day fixing his bike. 3. C Sometimes, besides being creepy, spiders can be deadly. N Kevin is terrified of all spiders. P He wont play in the shed because of the spiders. A Many spiders like to live in dark, dirty places. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 91 2014 All rights reserved. Extended Thinking Remember the Concept Paul said passage B was more descriptive. The teacher said he was correct. Why is Paul correct? Explain. Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives. A The Kings Day 1. The King wore a crown. 2. The King spent all day hunting. 3. That night there was a party to celebrate his birthday. 4. Cakes were all over the tables. 5. The King opened his gifts. 6. The King thanked everyone for coming to his party. 7. The guests left at midnight. 8. The guests all had a good time. 55 words B The Kings Day 1. The Old King wore a golden crown. 2. The King spent all day deer hunting. 3. That night there was a huge party to celebrate his 50th birthday. 4. Decorated cakes were all over the fancy tables. 5. The King opened his many wrapped gifts. 6. He thanked everyone for coming to his wonderful party. 7. The tired and happy guests left at midnight. 61 words Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1

Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 92 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives. 1. N Mary went for a ride in the hot-air balloon. P She could see her house from above. C Also, she was able to find the school and river. A Fluffy clouds flew by as they went higher. 2. C Last summer, he went on a holiday to Sydney. N Mark visited the Sydney Opera House. P stunned to see how big it was in real life. He was A Impressed, he took pictures from every angle. 3. N Peter and Henry both went for the ball. A Angry, Henry grabbed the back of Peters shirt. P He got a red card from the referee. C After the game, Henry apologised to Peter. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 93

2014 All rights reserved. Extended Thinking Remember the Concept The Class Play 1. The students in Year 1 and Year 2 put on a Spring play. 2. Sarah and Ruth wore gold crowns. 3. Mary was a flower. 4. Velvet curtains were tied with gold cord. 5. They sang and danced. 6. The whole cast1 came out for the curtain call2. 43 words Sentences start in different ways to add variety and help the reader follow the meaning. Sentences can start with nouns, pronouns, adjectives and connectives. Word Bank after they red Sarah Ruth Mary 1. In sentence two, replace Sarah and Ruth with a pronoun. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. They wore gold crowns. 2. In sentence four, add an adjective to velvet. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. Red velvet curtains were tied with gold cord. 3. In sentence five, replace they with nouns. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. Sarah, Ruth and Mary sang and danced. 4. In sentence six, add a connective before The. Rewrite the sentence on the line below. After, the whole cast came out for the curtain call. Definitions 1 2 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1505.1 Recognise different ways to start a sentence. 94 the actors in a play actors stand at the front of the stage while the people clap 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will edit text. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY1705 Reread and edit student's own and others work using agreed criteria for text structures and language features Embedded Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELA1506 Understand how the grammatical category of possessives is signalled through apostrophes and how to use apostrophes with common and proper nouns Prerequisite(s):

Year 4 ACELY 1695 Reread and edit for meaning by adding, deleting or moving words or word groups to improve content and structure . Manipulative(s): This is a culminating lesson. It covers many sub-skills the students have previously learned. Special Instructions: Year 5 ACELY1705 Reread and edit student's own and others work using agreed criteria for text structures and language features Vocabulary Academic: edit, usually, identify Content: text Support: rinks, directions, crawls, gnomes, slices, prevents EDI Lesson Overview A95 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will edit text1. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does text mean? Text means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge Which sentence has the underlined word spelled correctly? Why? 1. The knife used to open the coconut needs to be sharp. 2. The nife used to open the coconut needs to be sharp. 3. My teacher told me to rite a story about my own life. 4. My teacher told me to write a story about my own life. Make the Connection Students, you already know how to identify misspelled words. Today, you will use this skill to help you edit text. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English

Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 95 anything that is written 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development To edit text means to identify1 errors in writing. Editing is usually2 done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. Year 5 Editing Standards Capitalisati on Punctuatio n ^ Spelling Titles The pronoun I Proper nouns (names of people and places) Beginning of a sentence End of sentence (. ? !) Quotation marks Apostrophes Contractions Silent beginning sounds Words with E-drop (moving) Words with prefixes Regular and irregular nouns Double consonants High-frequency words Verbs & Pronouns Simple verb tense Subject-verb agreement Pronouns (singular) Sentence Types Compound sentences Complex sentences knee twisted 1. I hurt my nee and twist my ankle when I was playing basketball. 2. It was painful really panful. 3. My foot became so brother swollen that I had to borrowsmy big brothers shoes. You 4. He said, you can only borrow them if I can use your basketball. 5. Fine, you can use it I promptly , Checking for Understanding Which sentence needs to be edited for

apostrophes? Edit it. A Which sentence needs to be edited for capitalisation? Edit it. C Which sentence needs to be edited for spelling? Edit it. teacher A The dogs ate my s teachers lunch. B waving B Neil was waveing to all the cars that were passing by. Horse C My cousin says that Light horse Boy is a great book. In your own words, what does it mean to edit text? To edit text means to ______________. replied. 6. But I also told him that he couldn couldnot keep it forever. t 62 words Definitions 1 2 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 96 find most of the time 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice To edit text means to identify errors in writing. Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. Edit text. 1 2 3 Checking for Understanding Read the text. Identify the error. (underline) Correct the error. (write) 2 3 Year 5 Editing Standards Capitalisati on

Punctuatio n ^ Spelling Titles The pronoun I Proper nouns (names of people and places) Beginning of a sentence End of sentence (. ? !) Quotation marks Apostrophes Contractions Silent beginning sounds Words with E-drop (moving) Words with prefixes Verbs & Pronouns Simple verb tense Subject-verb agreement Pronouns (singular) Sentence Types Compound sentences Complex sentences Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. How did I/you identify the error? How did I/you correct the error? Application Ice Skating 1. Most people only think of ice skatin g skateing as a sport for the winter. indoo r indor ice skating rinks 2. However, 1 allow for year-round skating. 3. It is children very joyful to sees childrens smiles glide as they glided on the ice. 4. Very dislik e few people dislik ice skating. To which sentence do you need to add a pronoun (we, they)? Write. B To which sentence do you need to add a conjunction (before, after)? Write. C To which sentence do you need to add a

contraction (theyve, Ive)? Write. A A My sister and her friend are dirty. Theyvebeen playing in the mud. ________ B The grasshoppers have hind legs for jumping.They _____ also have big eyes. Beforewe went to sleep, we had to C _______ help our mother clean the house. Definitions 42 words 1 97 enclosed areas for skating 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) To edit text means to identify errors in writing. Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. Checking for Understanding Edit text. 1 2 Read the text. Identify the correct answer. (circle) 2 How did I/you identify the correct answer? Edit for correct pronouns and verbs. My sister (whine, whines, whined) all the time. Yesterday, (she, he, it) was told to clean her room. All day long I had to listen to her (whine, whines, whined). Our dog Max (jump, jumps, jumped) over the fence and ran away. (We, She, They) spent all day looking for (she, him, he). Finally we (find, finds, found) him in the neighbours backyard. Edit compound and complex sentences. Choose the correct coordinating conjunction. Most wallabies are small, (for, and, yet, so) some can grow to be two metres in height! Choose the correct subordinating conjunction. Crocodiles are one of the most feared animals (after, unless, because, then) of their sharp teeth and speed. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 98 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) To edit text means to identify errors in writing.

Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. Checking for Understanding Edit text. 1 2 3 2 3 Read the text. Identify the error. (underline) Correct the error. (write) Year 5 Editing Standards Capitalisati on Punctuatio n ^ Spelling Titles The pronoun I Proper nouns (names of people and places) Beginning of a sentence End of sentence (. ? !) Quotation marks Apostrophes Contractions Silent beginning sounds Words with E-drop (moving) Words with prefixes Verbs & Pronouns Simple verb tense Subject-verb agreement Pronouns (singular) Sentence Types Compound sentences Complex sentences Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. How did I/you identify the error? How did I/you correct the error? Application The Most Wrinkled Dog in the wrinkl es they dogs World

1. My dogs face has a lot of rinkles. To which sentence do you need to add a pronoun (she, he)? Write. A To which sentence do you need to add a conjunction (whereas, because)? Write. C amazed 2. When people see him in the street, he How are amazeed to see how many he has. 3. The other day, a boy asked me, 4. joking To which sentence do you need to add a contraction (wasnt, hasnt)? Write. B A She _____ is Charlotte is a new student. very shy. how many wrinkles does he have? 5. B My sisters friend came to visit, but wasnt she _________ at home. About a 1,000 I replied. 6. I was only whereas C Insects have six legs _________ , jokeing. 47 words 99 spiders have eight legs. 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) To edit text means to identify errors in writing. Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. Checking for Understanding Edit text. 1 2 Read the text. Identify the correct answer. (circle) 2

How did I/you identify the correct answer? Edit for correct pronouns and verbs. My pet lizard (move, moves, moved) very fast. (He, Her, They) can outrun any animal in the neighbourhood. Last night he (run, runs, ran) faster than a car. Scientists recently (discover, discovers, discovered) what could be the oldest living thing on Earth. (They, It, He) is a giant fungus growing in a forest in the United States. Scientists (believe, believes, believed) the fungus could be more than 10,000 years old. Edit compound and complex sentences. Choose the correct subordinating conjunction. My friend told me, I will come to your house ( unless, therefore, whereas) it rains. Choose the correct coordinating conjunction. The African Elephant is the largest animal on land, (but, so, for, nor) the blue whale is the largest animal on Earth. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 100 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Edit text. Read the text. Steve wants you to help him edit his writing. Identify the sentences that need to be edited and correct them. 1. Somebody knockin was gnocking opened at the door. 2. I open the door, but I knack didnt see anyone. 3. My friend Jeff had a nack for playing jokes on me. 4. This time I decided to play a joke on him. 5. Great to see you, I said to the air. 6. My friend came out of hiding and youre said, Now, youare learning. Application To which sentence do you need to add a pronoun (they, we)? Write. C To which sentence do you need to add a conjunction (whether or not, since)? Write. A To which sentence do you need to add a contraction (youre, shes)? Write. B 56 words Sentence #

Not Correct 1 X 2 X 3 X 4 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. Correct Since it was raining a lot, we A _______ decided to play inside. Youre B My teacher told me, ________ very smart. They C We have great neighbours. ______ are always inviting us to have a meal with them. X 5 X 6 X 101 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance To edit text means to identify errors in writing. Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. 1 Editing text will help you correct your own writing. 1. Whales are always diveing into the water. 2. They can be sumerged in the ocean for an hour. 3. Scientists observing whales all the time. 2 Editing text will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to edit text? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to edit text? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English

Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 102 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept To edit text means to identify errors in writing. Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. Edit text. 1 2 3 Read the text. Identify the error. (underline) Correct the error. (write) Year 5 Editing Standards 1. Our parents bought gifts for hoping my sister and me. 2. I was hopeing to get a doll. 3. My necklace sister got the doll, and I got a disappoint necklac. ed 4. I was really disappointe. 5. My sister Capitalisati on Titles The pronoun I Beginning of a sentence Punctuatio n End of sentence (. ? !) Quotation marks Apostrophes Contractions ^ Spelling smiled asked, Do you want to trade. ? 6. I smile and nodded. 42 words Extended Thinking

Silent beginning sounds Words with E-drop (moving) Verbs & Pronouns Simple verb tense Subject-verb agreement Pronouns (singular) Sentence Types Compound sentences Complex sentences Richard says that the sentence does not need to be edited because it is correct. Do you agree or disagree. If you disagree, edit the sentence. wouldv known If I had nown how to ride a bike,eI wouldave gone with my friends. I disagree with Richard. The sentence needed editing. Summary Closure What did you learn today about editing text? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 103 Word Bank edit text capitalisation punctuation spelling verbs pronouns sentence types 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept To edit text means to identify errors in writing. Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. Edit text. 1 2 3 Read the text. Identify the error. (underline) Correct the error. (write) Year 5 Editing Standards Capitalisati on Punctuatio n

^ Spelling Verbs & Pronouns Sentence Types Titles The pronoun I Proper nouns (names of people and places) Beginning of a sentence 1. For a long time, my father wasnt friend s friends wasnot able to find his Application house. 2. The directions1 were inaccurat We e inaccurat. 3. He said, we are wasting End of sentence (. ? !) Quotation marks Apostrophes Contractions opene then, hisdfriend open the door waved Silent beginning sounds Words with E-drop (moving) Words with prefixes parked in front of his house all wasteing our time. 4. Just and wave to us. 5. We were To which sentence do you need to add a pronoun (he, she, it)? Write. C To which sentence do you need to add a conjunction (if, because, after)? Write. A To which sentence do you need to add a contraction (shes, its)? Write. B A along. Simple verb tense Subject-verb agreement Pronouns (singular)

44 words If _______ I want to play today, I need to do my chores first. Shes_____ B The new student is very nice. always smiling. Its ___ as big as a c The elephant is huge. bus. Compound sentences Complex sentences Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 104 instructions for going somewhere 2014 All rights reserved. ndependent Practice (continued) Remember the Concept To edit text means to identify errors in writing. Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. Edit text. 1 2 Read the text. Correct the error. (circle) Edit for correct pronouns and verbs. My friend and I (disassemble, disassembles, disassembled) the toy. (They, Her, We) wanted to see what was inside. We (did, does, done) it in three days. Australias Indigenous peoples (arrive, arrives, arrived) on the continent about 40,000 years ago. Historians believe that at that time, Asia and Australia were still (connect, connects, connected) by a land bridge. As the land masses separated, (people, person, persons) on either side adapted to their environment. Edit compound and complex sentences. Choose the correct subordinating conjunction. (Before, Since, Because) we played basketball, we had to finish our classwork. Choose the correct coordinating conjunction. A walkabout is a rite-of-passage journey taken during adolescence, (so, and, for) it involves living in the wilderness for six months. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 105 2014 All rights reserved.

Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Edit text, if necessary. To edit text means to identify errors in writing. Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. sometim 1. Gnats are tiny flies and are sandfiles. 2. They are found essomtimes called anywher gnats world. 3. Unlike mosquitoes, nats do not bite through eanywear around the gnats crawl clothing. 4. But they crawls1 into hair or under clothing. 5. A gnats bite can be very itchy. 39 words Year 5 Editing Standards Capitalisati on Titles The pronoun I Proper nouns (names of people and places) Beginning of a sentence Punctuatio n End of sentence (. ? !) Quotation marks Apostrophes Contractions A gnat (crawl, crawls, crawled) in my pyjamas last night. (They, It, We) was so tiny that I couldnt see it. I (grab, grabs, grabbed) my flashlight to help me find it. Choose the correct subordinating conjunction. Last night, my sister was crying (after, since, although) a mosquito bit her. ^ Extended Thinking Silent beginning sounds Words with E-drop (moving) Words with prefixes Spelling Complete the following sentences with the conjunctions: if because 1 __ If you have been bitten by a gnat, wash the bite with soap and water.

2 Gnats are found where there is a river ___________ they lay their e eggs in watery places. 3 You can put ice on a gnats bite ______ it hurts. 4 Because ________ gnats can get under clothing, they can get to places such as your ankles and waist. becaus if Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 106 Verbs & Pronouns Simple verb tense Subject-verb agreement Pronouns (singular) Sentence Types Compound sentences Complex sentences Definitions 1 moves using its legs 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Edit text, if necessary. write To edit text means to identify errors in writing. Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. knight He 1. The teacher told Joshua to rite a story. 2. he wanted to write about a night that went on a journey. 3. His teacher asked him, What kind of a journey. gnome

A ? dreame 4. Joshua d answered, a journey where the knight meets a nome1. 5. That night, Joshua dream of knights, gnomes and dragons. Year 5 Editing Standards 48 words Capitalisati on Titles The pronoun I Proper nouns (names of people and places) Beginning of a sentence Punctuatio n End of sentence (. ? !) Quotation marks Apostrophes Contractions Gnomes (appear, appears, appeared) in my dreams last night. (They, It, We) looked like tiny old men. In all the books I have read, gnomes always (wear, wears, wore) a little pointed hat. Choose the correct subordinating conjunction. (Until, Since, Although) garden gnomes are made out of clay, they break easily. Extended Thinking Silent beginning sounds Words with E-drop (moving) Words with prefixes Spelling Edit the following paragraph when needed. Underline and correct the error. couldve known 1. If I had nown how to ride a bike, I couldave gone fishing with my friends. 2. I have asked my brother to teach me many times. 3. I will myself says teach you tomorrow , he always say. 4. Today, I tried to learn by mysel, scraped ^ until but I scrape my knee. 5. I guess I will have to wait unti tomorrow. Verbs & Pronouns

Simple verb tense Subject-verb agreement Pronouns (singular) Sentence Types Compound sentences Complex sentences Definitions 55 words 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 107 small creatures of legend 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept Edit text, if necessary. safest knife To edit text means to identify errors in writing. Editing is usually done to correct errors in capitalisation, punctuation, spelling, verbs and pronouns and sentence types. knifes 1. What is the safes way to use a nife? 2. A knifes blade can cut, so you careful youre Slicing have to be very carful. 3. A sharp knife can slip while youre cutting. 4. You slice must slices1 away from your hand. 5. Sliceing away from your hand prevents2 an accidental cut. 6. You must curl your fingers under and hold the food fingerti with yourps fingetips when chopping. 60 words Julie (prevent, prevents, prevented) an accidental cut with a knife yesterday. Year 5 Editing Standards Capitalisati on Titles The pronoun I

Proper nouns (names of people and places) Beginning of a sentence Punctuatio n End of sentence (. ? !) Quotation marks Apostrophes Contractions (They, It, She) told her little sister to always cut away from her body. Julie always (watch, watches, watched) out for her sister. Choose the correct subordinating conjunction. (Although, Before, If) you drop your knife, let it fall. Dont try to catch it. ^ Extended Thinking You just learned how to edit. It is your turn to edit your writing. Silent beginning sounds Words with E-drop (moving) Words with prefixes Spelling Verbs & Pronouns Simple verb tense Subject-verb agreement Pronouns (singular) Sentence Types Compound sentences Complex sentences Definitions 1 2 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.1 Edit text. 108 cut keeps from happening 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will revise text. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY1705 Reread and edit student's own and others work using agreed criteria for text structures and language features Embedded Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY 1702 Navigate and read texts for specific purposes applying appropriate text processing strategies, for example predicting and confirming, monitoring meaning, skimming and scanning. Year 5 ACELY 1703 Use comprehension strategies to analyse information, integrating and linking

ideas from a variety of print and digital sources. Prerequisite(s): Year 4 ACELY 1695 Reread and edit for meaning by adding, deleting or moving words or word groups to improve content and structure . Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: These stories may be difficult for students to read. Please scaffold using the following strategies: 1. Make sure you pre-read some of the difficult words. 2. Pre-read using the Fluency Strategy. 3. Define the words through pictures, gestures or examples. Vocabulary Academic: revise, improve, determine Content: text Support: underneath, announced, superstition, replied, audition, adopt, dreading, nuisance, protested, proceeded, awesome, corridor, frantic A109 EDI Lesson Overview 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will revise text1. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does text mean? Text means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge Read the story and answer the questions. 1. Audrey is a very good student. 2. She always receives good grades. 3. She likes to eat a lot of vegetables. 4. In class, Audrey is always the first one to answer all the questions. Which sentences belong together? A 1, 2, 4 B 1, 2, 3 Which sentence does not belong? A 3 B 4 Make the Connection Students, you already know which sentences belong together and which sentences do not belong together. This skill will help you revise text. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2

Revise text. 109 anything that is written 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development Revise means to change written text to improve it. Revision is usually done by adding sentences, deleting sentences or rearranging sentences. Revise Text Add sentences to give more details. Delete sentences that do not fit. The Crane and The Crow Australian Legend 1. The crane was a great fisherman. 2. He used his feet to scare out the fish from underneath the logs in the creek, and then he was able to catch lots of fish in his pointy beak. 3. One day when he had many fish, a bright white crow came up. 4. He asked the crane to give him some fish. 5. Wait a while," said the crane, " until they are cooked." 6. The crow also eats grasshoppers and other insects. 7. When the crane turned his back, the crow decided to steal a fish. 8. The crane is a big, long-legged bird. 9. The crane turned and saw him, seized the fish and hit him right across the eyes. 10. When he got up to go away his eyes were white, and the rest of him black, as crows have been ever since. 11. The crow felt blinded for a few minutes. 149 words Checking for Understanding Which sentence(s) has more details? Explain your answer. C Which sentence(s) need to have some details deleted. Explain your answer. B Which sentences need to be put in order. Explain your answer. A A They eat fish and insects. Cranes can eat many things. B Cranes are tall birds. Grow many plants around the pond to keep cranes from eating your fish. C Cranes are large, long-legged and long-necked birds. D Cranes are birds. In your own words, what does it mean

to revise text? Revise text means to ______________. Change the order of sentences #11 and #10. Rearrange sentences to put in order. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2 Revise text. 110 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Revise means to change written text to improve it. Revision is usually done by adding sentences, deleting sentences or rearranging sentences. Revise Text. 1 2 3 Read the whole story. Read the question to determine2 what to look for. (underline ) Add a sentence to give more details. (answer question) Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you determine what information to underline in the question? 2 How did/you know which sentence to add? The Superstition3 Add sentences to give more details. 1. I always, always, always wear my blue ring. 2. I know it is the reason I am so lucky. 3. One day my teacher announced4 that we were going to have a swimming competition. 4. I knew I was going to win because of my blue ring. 5. One day, I forgot Delete sentences that do not fit. my blue ring and I fell on my way to school. Rearrange sentences to put in order. 6. The day of the competition, I was ready with my blue ring snuggly placed on Application my finger. 7. The starting gun went off. 8. We dove in the water and I flew across the Why do you think the title of the story is The Superstition? Explain. pool. 9. Australians are great swimmers. 10. I won the competition. 11. I lifted my hand to admire my lucky blue ring, but it was gone. 12. I panicked. 13. My teacher came over A Because the swimmer thought that the blue ring was the key to her success. to see what was happening, and I showed her my hand without the ring.

B Because the swimmer thought that swimming often was the key to success. C Because the teacher thought that practising every day was the key to success. 1. Which sentence should be added after sentence 4? A Some days I didnt want to swim. B I didnt need to practise because I had my lucky ring. C Swimming was too hard to do every day. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2 Revise text. words be134 added 2. Which sentence should after sentence 13? A My teacher said, Perhaps, you didnt need your lucky ring after all. B My teacher said, Go back into the pool to search for it. C My teacher said, I will give you another ring. 111 Definitions 2 3 4 figure out a belief in chance or magic told us 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Revise means to change written text to improve it. Revision is usually done by adding sentences, deleting sentences or rearranging sentences. Revise Text. 1 2 3 Read the whole story. Read the question to determine what to look for. (underline ) Delete sentences that do not fit. (cross-out and answer question) Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you determine what information to underline in the question? 2 How did/I you know which sentence to delete? Add sentences to give more details.

The Superstition 1. I always, always, always wear my blue ring. 2. I know it is the reason I am so lucky. 3. One day my teacher announced that we were going to have a swimming Delete sentences that do not fit. competition. 4. I knew I was going to win because of my blue ring. 5. One day, I forgot Rearrange sentences to put in order. my blue ring and I fell on my way to school. Application 6. The day of the competition, I was ready with my blue ring snuggly placed on my finger. 7. The starting gun went off. 8. We dove in the water and I flew across the pool. 9. Australians are great swimmers. 10. I won the competition. 11. I lifted my hand to admire my lucky blue ring, but it was gone. 12. I panicked. 13. My teacher came over to see what was happening, and I showed her my hand without the ring. 134 words 3. Which sentence should be deleted? 4. Which sentence should be deleted? A Sentence 2 A Sentence 7 B Sentence 4 B Sentence 9 C Sentence 5 C Sentence 10 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2 Revise text. 112 When did you know that the ring was not the key to her success? Explain A Sentence 7 B Sentence 9 C Sentence 11 Why do you think the author uses always three times at the beginning of the story? Explain. A The author wanted us to know that the character is responsible. B The author wanted to convince us that the ring was very important to the swimmer. C The author wanted us to know that the ring had very special powers. 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Revise means to change written text to improve it.

Revision is usually done by adding sentences, deleting sentences or rearranging sentences. Revise Text. 1 2 3 Read the whole story. Read the question to determine what to look for. (underline ) Rearrange sentences to place in order. (answer question) Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you determine what information to underline in the question? 2 How did/you know which sentence to rearrange? Add sentences to give more details. The Adoption5 1. One day my dad said, Mia, it is time for you to adopt a pet. 2. I had been dreading6 this. 3. I would have to feed her, clean up after her and take her for long Delete sentences that do not fit. walks. Rearrange sentences to put in order. 4. My friend Olivia has a dog. 5. It is so much work. Application 6. The next day on my way back from school, a dog was following me. 7. She must have thought I was playing hide-and-seek because she quickly found me. 8. I took a Why do you think the title of the story is The Adoption? Explain. little stick and I threw it at her. 9. She must have thought I was playing fetch because A she brought it back to me. 10. I decided to hide behind a big tree. 11. When I got home I told my dad, Meet my new dog. 12. She adopted me! 5. Which sentence should be rearranged? A Place Sentence 4 after Sentence 2 6. Which sentence should be 119 words rearranged? A Place Sentence 7 after Sentence 6 B Place Sentence 4 after Sentence 1 B Place Sentence 7 after Sentence 10 C Place Sentence 4 after Sentence 6 C Place Sentence 7 after Sentence 8 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2

Revise text. 113 Because Mia wanted to be adopted. B Because even though Mia wasnt sure about adopting a pet, the little dog adopted her. C Because Mias father really wanted her to adopt a pet. Definitions 5 6 taking in not wanting to do it 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Revise Text. The Adoption 1. One day my dad said, Mia, it is time for you to adopt a pet. 2. I had been dreading this. 3. I would have to feed her, clean up after her and take her for long walks. 4. My friend Olivia has a dog. 5. It is so much work. 6. The next day on my way back from school, a dog was following me. 7. She must have thought I was playing hide-and-seek because she quickly found me. 8. I took a little stick and I threw it at her. 9. She must have thought I was playing fetch because she brought it back to me. 10. I decided to hide behind a big tree. 11. When I got home I told my dad, Meet my new dog. 12. She adopted me! 119 words Application How did Olivias attitude towards dogs change in the story? A At the beginning, she thought they were trouble . At the end, she knew that they can be fun. B At the beginning, she did not like Olivias dog. At the end she decided to adopt one to please her dad. C At the beginning, she did not like dogs. At the end, she is upset that she has to adopt one. Decide where in the story to add the following sentences. Explain. Sentence 1 The dog also barks even when Olivia and I are having a serious conversation. 2 I told my dad, I decided not to adopt a dog. 3 I tried to ignore her. She gently put her paws on my knees and wagged her tail with delight. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2 Revise text. Add after Sentence..

5. Do not add X 10 114 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Revise means to change written text to improve it. Revision is usually done by adding sentences, deleting sentences or rearranging sentences. 1 Revising text will help improve your own writing. The Two Wishes 1. Oscar the fish was always very sad. 2. He wanted to get out of the water and live with the humans. 3. One day, he was granted his wish. 4. When he tried to walk on the ground, he found it very difficult to walk with his tail fins. 5. At lunch, when the humans ate tomatoes, mangoes and carrots, Oscar thought they were good, too. 6. He really missed the delicious seaweed. 7. And, the air was too thin outside the water. 8. He wanted to go back to his bubbly pond. 9. So with that, Oscar made another wish, to return home. 2 Revising text will help you do well on tests. Understanding the Relevance Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to revise text? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to revise text? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2 Revise text. 115 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Revise Text. 1 2 3 Read the whole story. Read the question to determine what to look for. (underline ) Add a sentence to give more details. (answer question) The Two Wishes Revise means to change written text to improve it. Revision is usually done by adding sentences, deleting sentences or rearranging sentences. 1. Oscar the fish was always very sad. 2. He wanted to get out of the water and live with the humans. 3. One day, he was granted his wish. 4. When he tried to walk on the ground, he found it very difficult to walk with his tail fins. 5. At lunch, when the humans ate tomatoes, mangoes and carrots, Oscar thought they were good, too. 6. He really missed the delicious seaweed. 7. And, the air was too thin outside the water. 8. He wanted to go back to his bubbly pond. 9. So with that, Oscar made another wish. 91 words

1. Which sentence should be added after sentence 4? A. They felt too heavy when cruising in the water. B They felt so much stronger when cruising in the water. C They felt as light as they felt in the water. Extended Thinking Patrick says that Oscars new wish is to have legs like humans. Do you agree or disagree with him? was not happy with anything outside I agree/disagree with Patrick because Oscar ___________________________________________________ the pond. His wish was probably to go back to the pond. __________________________________________________________________________________________ revise text add delete rearrange Summary Closure What did you learn today about revising text? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2 Revise text. Word Bank 116 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Revise means to change written text to improve it. Revision is usually done by adding sentences, deleting sentences or rearranging sentences. Revise Text. 1 Read the story. 2 Read the question to determine what to look for. (underline ) 3 Add a sentence to give more details. (answer question) 4 Delete the sentences that do not fit. (cross-out and answer question) The Storyteller 1. Donna, you are going to stay with your grandma for a couple of days, my mum said. 2. My grandma is the nicest lady I have ever known. 3. I quickly replied9, No, I will not go! 4. It will be boring. 5. So, I had no other choice but to go. 6. Little did I know that this visit would change my life forever. Add sentences to give more details. Delete sentences that do not fit. Rearrange sentences to put in order. 60 words 1. Which sentence should be added after sentence 3? A My mum said, I am going out of town on business and your father is too. You cannot stay

home alone. 2. Which sentence should be deleted? A Sentence 1 B Sentence 2 C Sentence 3 B My mum said, Thats fine. You dont have to go if you dont want to. C My mum said, Thats fine. Maybe your sister wants to go. Definitions 9 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2 Revise text. 117 answered 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Read the story. Determine which sentence needs to be added or deleted. The Storyteller 6. Early in the morning, my grandma woke me up. 7. Why so early? I protested1. 8. As we started to walk, she pointed to some footprints. 9. Dingoes were here last night, she said. 10. She continued to tell me that early indigenous people used dingo hides as a blanket to keep warm at night. 11. The two days were so boring. 12. It was awesome2 how my grandma knew so much about all the plants and animals around us. 13. When I got back home I asked my mum, When do I get to go back to my grandmas house? 60 words 1. Which sentence should be added after sentence 7? A We want to make sure we walk all day, she said with a knowing smile. B We do not want to miss the sunrise, she said with a knowing smile. 2. Which sentence should be deleted? A Sentence 7 Revise means to change written text to improve it. Revision is usually done by adding sentences, deleting sentences or rearranging sentences. Add sentences to give more details. Delete sentences that do not fit. B Sentence 11 Rearrange sentences to put in order.

C Sentence 10 Application D Sentence 13 Who is The Storyteller in the story? Explain. A C We do not want to sleep anymore, she said with a knowing smile. Donna B Donnas mum Extended Thinking C Donnas grandma Decide where in the story to add the following sentences. Explain. Sentence Add after Sentence... 1 She saw other footprints and said, Those are from kangaroos. They must have been running away from the dingoes. 10 2 She pointed to a plant and said, That's the hibiscus plant. It can be used to cure colds. 12 3 Definitions 1 2 Most people think of the dingo as a wild dog. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2 Revise text. Do not add complained amazing X 118 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Read the story. Determine which sentence needs to be added or deleted. The Nightmare 1. I was in the corridor1 of a big castle with a thousand rooms. 2. She called me by name to warn me, Chelsea, you will never get out! 3. There was a witch chasing after me. 4. There were so many rooms that I was totally lost.

5. I opened one door, and a monster came out. 6. I ran and ran and ran until I was able to get away. 7. I opened another door, and a dragon came out. 8. I hid under a big bed, so he was not able to hurt me. 9. I was getting frantic2 . 10. I needed to get away. 11. I could leap to my safety! 12. Too many scary things were chasing me. 13. Finally I made a run for it and came to a window that opened. 14. As I was about to jump, I heard my mum say, Chelsea, its time to wake up. 60 words 1. Which sentence should be rearranged? A Place Sentence 2 after Sentence 4 B Place Sentence 2 before Sentence 1 C Place Sentence 2 after Sentence 3 Revise means to change written text to improve it. Revision is usually done by adding sentences, deleting sentences or rearranging sentences. Add sentences to give more details. Delete sentences that do not fit. Rearrange sentences to put in order. 2. Which sentence should be rearranged? A Place Sentence 11 after Sentence 13 B Place Sentence 13 after Sentence 14 C Place Sentence 13 after Sentence 10 Extended Thinking Decide where in the story to add the following sentences. Explain. Sentence 1 I opened another door; a giant came out. He was so tall I was only able to see his shoes. 2 I opened another door. The room was very dark but I could hear an eerie laughter coming from within. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2 Revise text. Add After Sentence 5 Add After Sentence 7 X X Definitions 1 2 119 hallway worried 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept

Read the story. Determine which sentence needs to be added or deleted. The Nightmare 1. I was in the corridor of a big castle with a thousand rooms. 2. She called me by name to warn me, Chelsea, you will never get out! 3. There was a witch chasing after me. 4. There were so many rooms that I was totally lost. 5. I opened one door, and a monster came out. 6. I ran and ran and ran until I was able to get away. 7. I opened another door, and a dragon came out. 8. I hid under a big bed, so he was not able to hurt me. 9. I was getting frantic. 10. I needed to get away. 11. I could leap to my safety! 12. Too many scary things were chasing me. 13. Finally I made a run for it and came to a window that opened. 14. As I was about to jump, I heard my mum say, Chelsea, its time to wake up. 60 words Revise means to change written text to improve it. Revision is usually done by adding sentences, deleting sentences or rearranging sentences. Add sentences to give more details. Delete sentences that do not fit. Rearrange sentences to put in order. 1. Which sentence should be added after sentence 4? A All the rooms looked exactly the same, so I just started opening doors. Application B I knew I was going to find scary things behind every door. When did you know that Chelsea is having a nightmare? Explain. C All the rooms were locked, and I couldnt opened any of them. A Sentence 1 B Sentence 2 Extended Thinking C Sentence 14 Decide where in the story to add the following sentences. Explain. Sentence 1 The flames coming out of his nostrils almost scorched my hair. 2 I gave my mum a big embrace. 3 That was a delightful dream! Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1705.2 Revise text. Add after

Sentence... Do not add 7 14 X 120 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will recognise the attributes of a narrative. Content Descriptor: ACELA 1504 Understand how texts vary in purpose, structure and topic as well as the degree of formality Embedded Content Descriptor: ACELY 1702 Read with fluency Prerequisite(s): Special Instructions: Year 4 ACELA 1490 Recognise the attributes of a simple narrative. Year 3 ACELA 1478 Recognise the language features of narratives. Teachers may want to have students read Peter Pan so they will be familiar with the story when reading the adaptations in the lesson. Or teachers may want to summarise the story or show a movie version if the students are not familiar with the story. Vocabulary Academic: recognise, identify Content: attributes, signal words, setting, characters, plot Support: nursery, adventures, kennel EDI Lesson Overview A121 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will recognise1 the attributes of a narrative. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does recognise mean? Recognise means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge Which passage is a story? Use your whiteboards. A. B.

All About Spiders Spiders have eight legs. Spiders do not have antennae. Spiders spin webs. Spiders live in gardens and sheds. Make the Connection Students, you already know a narrative tells a story. Now, we will recognise the attributes of a narrative. Charlotte the Spider Charlotte the spider lived in a shed. She was able to write messages in her web. She was friends with Wilbur the pig. One day she saved him from being killed. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 121 to know something when you see it 2014 All rights reserved. Signal Words3 Setting Concept Development A narrative tells a story. Attributes2 of a narrative include setting, characters and plot. Setting is the place, time and history of the story. Characters are people, animals or things that talk or act in the story. Plot is the main events of the story. Names of places Descriptions of places Time of day or history Weather or season Characters Personal names Pronouns How they look or feel How they talk or act Attributes of a Narrative Plot (adapted from Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie) Attributes Setting Text Examples Neverland is an island. The

trees and coral reefs have splashes of colour. A flowing river runs through a dark cave. "What's your name?" he Characte asked. "Wendy," she replied proudly. rs "What is your name?" "Peter Pan." Plot They were a happy family until the coming of Peter Pan. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. Signal Words Text Evidence Names of places Neverland, island Description of places colour, reefs, caves, river Personal names How they talk Pronouns How she feels Wendy, Peter direct speech he, she proudly Main Event the coming of Peter Pan 122 Main Events Checking for Understanding What is the difference between setting and characters? How do you know? The difference between setting and characters is _________________. Which of the following could most likely be part of a plot? A the field was near the school B Ethan was tall and friendly C the boy kicked a goal What are attributes of a narrative? Attributes of a narrative include ________. Definitions

2 3 qualities of something (signal words) words that help identify attributes 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Attributes of a narrative include setting, characters and plot. Setting includes the place, time and history. Characters are people, animals or things that talk or act in the story. Plot is the main events of the story. Checking for Understanding Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 1 2 How did I/you identify signal words that describe the attribute? Read the passages below, take notice of the attribute. Identify4 signal words that describe the attribute. (underline) Signal Words Setting (adapted from Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie) Names of places Descriptions of places Time of day or history Weather or season Attribute: The setting is the nursery at night. Characters 1. The nursery5 was dimly lit by three nightlights. Three beds were lined up along the wall. A window looked out at the stars. Personal names Pronouns How they look or feel How they talk or act Plot Main Events Attribute: The setting is near a window in a house at night. 2. Their mothers body shook, and she checked the window of the house to be sure it was locked. She looked outside to see who was there. The street was empty but the night sky was full of stars. Application The text in #2 shows how the mother feels. The way she feels is: A tired and worried B funny and fearful C worried and protective D curious and empty Definitions 4 5

Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 123 find childrens room 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Attributes of a narrative include setting, characters and plot. Setting includes the place, time and history. Characters are people, animals or things that talk or act in the story. Plot is the main events of the story. Checking for Understanding Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 1 2 How did I/you identify signal words that describe the attribute? Read the passages below, take notice of the attribute. Identify signal words that describe the attribute. (underline) Signal Words Setting (adapted from Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie) Names of places Descriptions of places Time of day or history Weather or season Attribute: The character is Peter Pan. Characters 3. Peter Pan was a good-looking boy, dressed in clothes made of green leaves. He was also a boy who liked adventures6. Personal names Pronouns How they look or feel How they talk or act Plot Main Events Attribute: The characters are Mr Darling and Nana (the dog). 4. When commands would not make Nana come out of the kennel7, Mr Darling called her out of it with sweet words, and seizing her roughly, dragged her from the room. He was ashamed of himself, and yet he did it. It was all due to his wanting people to like him and say good things about him. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 124 Application The text in #4 shows how the father

feels about Nana. The way he feels is: A angry but friendly B tough but funny C tricky and tough D needy and wanting Definitions 6 7 exciting experiences doghouse 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Attributes of a narrative include setting, characters and plot. Setting includes the place, time and history. Characters are people, animals or things that talk or act in the story. Plot is the main events of the story. Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 1 2 Read the passages below, take notice of the attribute. Identify signal words that describe the attribute. (underline) How did I/you identify signal words that describe the attribute? Signal Words Setting (adapted from Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie) Attribute: The plot event is leaves found on the floor. 5. Some leaves of a tree had been found on the floor. They were not there when the children went to bed, and Mrs Darling was trying to figure out where they came from. Wendy said that Peter might have dropped the leaves there when he came to the nursery at night. Attribute: The plot event is the boy losing his shadow. 6. Mrs Darling found that Nana had something in her mouth. It was the boy's shadow. Nana had tried to stop him from leaping out the window by closing it quickly. He got out, but his shadow did not. The window slammed and snapped off his shadow. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. Checking for Understanding 125 Names of places Descriptions of places Time of day or history Weather or season Characters Personal names Pronouns How they look or feel How they talk or act Plot

Main Events Application In text #6, Nana captures the boys shadow. Why is this important? A it shows how good Nana is B it shows that shadows come off C it gives evidence the boy was there D it shows the boy is not real 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Checking for Understanding Here are two passages a narrative and a review. Which passage is a narrative? How do you know? (adapted from Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie and from http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/12/prweb11386441.htm) A. Peter: The Untold True Story is not a retelling of the fairy tale of Peter Pan, it is a book about the adventures of Peter the Wild Boy, a real-life wild child from the 18th century It is Christopher Mechling's belief that Peter the Wild Boy's life and times also served as an inspiration for James Barrie. 1 How did I/you determine the purpose for reading? 2 How did I/you locate information that matches the purpose? 3 How did I/you ensure my/your response matched the purpose? Passage B ___ is a narrative. Why? Passage B has words spoken by characters. Passage A is a review B. "Nana, good dog," he said, patting her, "I have put a little milk into your bowl, Nana. Nana wagged her tail, ran to her bowl where Mr Darling had poured his medicine, and began lapping it. Then she gave Mr Darling such a look, and crept into her kennel. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 126 that argues about how the story was created. There is no setting or plot. 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Attributes of a narrative include setting, characters and plot. Setting includes the place, time and history. Characters are people, animals or things that talk or act in the story. Plot is the main events of the story. 1 Recognising the attributes of a narrative will help you understand and discuss stories and movies.

You can read The Hobbit and understand the setting in Middle Earth; the characters, such as dwarfs, elves and wizards; and the plot of the journey into Mordor. This will help you explain or discuss the book and the movie. 2 Recognising the attributes of a narrative will help you do well on tests. Understanding the Relevance Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to recognise the attributes of a narrative? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to recognise the attributes of a narrative? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 127 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 1 2 Read the passages below, noting the attribute. Identify signal words that describe the attribute. (underline) (adapted from Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie) Attribute: The setting is an island that seems to be alive. They were now over the scary island, flying so low that sometimes a tree hit their feet. Their progress was slow and rough. It was like they were pushing through a wall of air that was pushing back at them. They hung in the air until Peter had beaten on it with his fists. Application In the text, the air seems to be alive. How can you tell? A it wasnt visible C it was slow and rough B a tree pushed on their feet D they had to push through it and beat on it Attributes of a narrative include setting, characters and plot. Setting includes the place, time and history. Characters are people, animals or things that talk or act in the story. Plot is the main events of the story. Signal Words Setting Names of places Descriptions of places Time of day or history Weather or season Characters Personal names Pronouns How they look or feel How they talk or act Plot

Main Events Extended Thinking Adriana said the passage above was mainly about characters because it had the name Peter in it. Do you agree? Why or why not? Peter is the name of a character but the passage is mainly about a place like an island with trees and a wall of air. Thus the attribute is setting. Summary Closure Word Bank attributes narrative setting characters plot What did you learn today about recognising attributes of a narrative? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 128 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Attributes of a narrative include setting, characters and plot. Setting includes the place, time and history. Characters are people, animals or things that talk or act in the story. Plot is the main events of the story. Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 1 2 Read the passages below, take notice of the attribute. Identify signal words that describe the attribute. (underline) (adapted from Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie) Attribute: The character is James Hook. 1. In the midst of them was James Hook. He lay at his ease in a chair on wheels pulled by his men. Instead of a right hand he had an iron hook with which he urged his men to move faster. In person his face looked dead. His hair was full of long curls, which looked like black candles. Attribute: The plot event is the pirates discovering the chimney. 2. The pirates lifted up the large mushroom. Smoke began at once to ascend. The pirates looked at each other. "A chimney!" they both exclaimed. They had discovered the chimney of the home of the lost boys under the ground. Attribute: The setting is a secure house at night. 3. The little house looked so safe in the darkness, with a bright light showing through its windows, and the chimney smoke rising up with the stars, and Peter standing on guard. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1

Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 129 Signal Words Setting Names of places Descriptions of places Time of day or history Weather or season Characters Personal names Pronouns How they look or feel How they talk or act Plot Main Events Application The description of James Hook in #1 shows that he is A friendly but a follower B lazy and scary C sad but handsome D scary and pushy 2014 All rights reserved. ndependent Practice (continued) Here are three passages an informative news article, a narrative text, and a movie review. Which passage is a narrative? How do you know? (adapted from Treasure Island by R.L. Stevenson, Wikipedia, and The Making of a Thru-Hiker 6 by Gail Storey) A. Long-distance hikers move around a lot and rarely see each other. But they do pile up in the towns. You can spot such hikers by the way they walk gingerly on blistered feet and tired legs. B. Crocodile Dundee is a character in a 1986 movie, inspired by the true life exploits of Rodney Ansell. The story involves Newsday writer Sue Charlton coming to Walkabout Creek in the Northern Territory to do a story on Michael J. Mick Crocodile Dundee who is famous for wrestling crocodiles. They have many adventures in Australia and in New York. Passage C___ is a narrative. Why? Passage C has words spoken by characters and it suggests a plot about adventure. Passage A tells about hiking C. "Now, Jim, you tell me true: that ain't Flint's ship?" he asked. I began to believe that I had found an ally, and I answered him at once. "It's not Flint's ship, and Flint is dead; but I'll tell you true, as you ask me there are some of Flint's men aboard." "Not a manwith oneleg?" he gasped. "Silver?" I asked. "Ah, Silver!" says he. "That were his name." Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 130

but it names no characters or a plot. Passage B is a movie review. Crocodile Dundee is a character but there is no action or talking by the character. 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Recognise the attributes of a narrative. Attribute: The setting is a scary lagoon1. 1. a change came to the lake. Little shivers ran over it, and the sun went away and shadows sneaked across the water, turning it cold. The lagoon that had always been a laughing place seemed dangerous and unfriendly. Attribute: The character is Peter Pan. Attributes of a narrative include setting, characters and plot. Setting includes the place, time and history. Characters are people, animals or things that talk or act in the story. Plot is the main events of the story. Signal Words Setting 2. Peter was not quite like other boys; but he was afraid at last. Peter felt just the first shaking of fear. Next moment he was standing on the rock again, ready to fight. Names of places Descriptions of places Time of day or history Weather or season Characters Personal names Pronouns How they look or feel How they talk or act Extended Thinking An author wants to show a setting that is scary and dangerous. Read the text closely to determine which passage below is best to use? How do you know? 1. The small island was just off the coast near Darwin. There were many loud birds and Plot Main Events lizards on the ground. The weather was very hot. 2. A skyscraper in Sydney loses electricity. The lifts dont work. You have to feel your way down the dark stairs step by step. People are screaming and crying. 3. There is a cave on the coast. A tour guide leads you through the dark passages, and you see strange rocks and hear unusual noises. The tour guide tells you what it is. The best choice for setting#is _____ because 2 and dangerous. In #1 the weather may be The skyscraper in the storm is scary Definitions 1

small body of water dangerous but not scary. In #3, the cave is scary but not dangerous as there is a guide. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 131 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Recognise the attributes of a narrative. Attribute: The plot event is Tinkerbell dying and how to save her. "What is the matter with you?" cried Peter, suddenly afraid. "I was poisoned, Peter," Tinkerbell told him softly; "and now I am going to be dead." Her voice was so low. She was saying that she thought she could get well again if children believed in fairies. Peter flung out his arms and spoke to all who might be dreaming of Neverland. "Do you believe?" he cried. "If you believe," he shouted to them, "clap your hands; don't let Tink die." Attributes of a narrative include setting, characters and plot. Setting includes the place, time and history. Characters are people, animals or things that talk or act in the story. Plot is the main events of the story. Signal Words Setting Names of places Descriptions of places Time of day or history Weather or season Characters Extended Thinking An author wants to write about characters who are excellent sports players and who are involved with the community. Read the text closely to determine which passage below is best to use? How do you know? Personal names Pronouns How they look or feel How they talk or act Plot Main Events 1. Barry is a champion basketball player. He is tall and fast. He makes good moves and passes a lot to his teammates. He also works as a fisherman in the off season. 2. Luke works as a volunteer for Sydney Opera and helps organize the local 10km runs for cancer. He plays beach volleyball for fun. 3. Karl is a professional surfer. He likes to ride the biggest waves and take chances. He is also a national spokesperson for Muscular Dystrophy, especially for children. The best choice for characters#is _____ because 3 #3 is best because the character is a professional athlete and helps the community. #1 does not help the community. #2 is not a great sports player.

Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1 Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 132 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept Recognise the attributes of a narrative. Attributes of a narrative include setting, characters and plot. Setting includes the place, time and history. Characters are people, animals or things that talk or act in the story. Plot is the main events of the story. Read a passage in any of the following books and identify attributes of a narrative, such as setting, character, or plot. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl Rowan of Rin by Emily Rodda Soraya the Storyteller by Rosanne Hawke The Riddle of the Trumpalar by Judy Bernard-Waite The Carpet People by Terry Pratchett Signal Words Setting Names of places Descriptions of places Time of day or history Weather or season Characters Extended Thinking An author wants to write a story that involves a fantasy plot with magical events. Read the text closely to determine which passage below is best to use? How do you know? Personal names Pronouns How they look or feel How they talk or act Plot Main Events 1. The boys landed on an island and built a fort. Then they hunted for food. The animals were most amazing. They made strange sounds and left big footprints. 2. Jill and Liza walked around the giant tree and stepped into another world. The flowers were all diffferent colours. The pathway was gold. In the distance, they saw a unicorn. 3. The spaceship blasted off the station and headed toward Aldebaran. Its mission was to find out what kind of life was there. Were the stories of flying animals true? # The best choice for fantasy plot is _____ because 2 #2 is best as it has a plot about a new world and a magical animal. #1 may have strange animals but it could be a real island. #3 is a different world but nothing magical is described. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1504.1

Recognise the attributes of a narrative. 133 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will identify the narrator. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELT 1610 Recognise that ideas in literary texts can be conveyed from different viewpoints, which can lead to different kinds of interpretations and responses Embedded Content Descriptor: Prerequisite(s): Year 4 ACELT 1605.1 Explain how authors describe characters. Year 4 ACELT 1605.2 Explain how authors create plot tension. Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: This standard has three different parts. In this lesson, we will focus on identifying the narrator. In the next lesson, we will focus on how points of view affect the story, and embed the third part of how point of view changes when an animal or spirit is the narrator. Vocabulary Academic: Identify, determine Content: narrator, omniscient, limited, first-person, third-person Support: the cats meow, ordeal EDI Lesson Overview A134 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will identify1 the narrator. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does identify mean? Identify means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge Who is telling the story? Use your whiteboards. A. I like to play soccer, said Anthony. Its my favourite game to play. My teammates think its fun too. B. Anthony likes to play soccer, said the coach. He says its his favourite game. His teammates like the way he plays too.

A Anthony B the coach C the teammates A Anthony B the coach C the teammates Make the Connection Students, you already know how to tell who is telling, or narrating, a story when talking. Now, we will identify the narrator in text. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. 134 find 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development Narrator Clue Words A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. Types of Narrator Type of narrator 1st person 3rd person limited (only one) 3rd person omniscie nt (many) 3rd Person (one or many) I, my, me, mine, we, our, ours Joe, Sarah, he, she, they Checking for Understanding 1 Which is an example of first-person narrator? How do you know? Text

Whose thoughts are known? 1. I am writing this story about my grandfather who was born in 1865. 2. I like to think I look a lot like my grandfather. 22 words Is thoughts (I, my, am writing, like to think) 1. Carson smiled when he saw the butterfly land on the tree. 2. It was beautiful. 3. He really liked to watch birds and insects. 23 words Carsons thoughts (Carson, he, smiled, liked) 1. Paul sat on the beach remembering. 2. Years ago he used to surf. 3. David, a young surfer, disliked having the old man watch him surf. 4. Alex, who was a bit older, was sad that Paul could not surf anymore. 38 words Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. 1st Person Go to Skill Dev 1 Go to Skill Dev 2 Pauls thoughts (remembering); Davids thoughts (disliked); Alexs thoughts (sad) Go to Skill Dev 3 135 A The boys ran. They had been running for a long time now. B I had not seen the house in the country, so I took a trip to see it. Checking for Understanding 2 Which is an example of third-person limited narrator? How do you know? A Ahmed believed he could make the jump. So, he leaped. B I didnt think I could make the jump. I backed up and leaped. Checking for Understanding 3 Which is an example of third-person omniscient narrator? How do you know? A The girl ate slowly. She was hungry, and wanted to enjoy it. B Tina was glad to get a meal.

Ethan wanted more. He burped. In your own words, what is a narrator? A narrator is ______________. 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. Narrator Clue Words 1st Person (one or many) I, my, me, mine, we, our, ours Read the text, paying attention to who is telling the story. Identify narrator clue words. (circle) Determine2 whose thoughts are known. (underline thoughts or actions) Narrator: 1st person A. 1. I do not remember when the train first came to Cairns. 2. I would have been only three years old. 3. My family worked for the railroad. 4. I learned a lot about engines. 33 words I, my Clue words ______________________________ Thoughts/actions: remembered, worked, ____________________________ learnedthoughts are known?______________ I Whose Joe, Sarah, he, she, they Checking for Understanding Identify the narrator. 1 2 3 3rd Person 2 3 How did I/you identify the narrator clue words? How did I/you determine whose thoughts are known? Narrator: 1st person B. 1. My eyes stared straight ahead. 2. My mouth gaped open. 3. I had just seen my first crocodile up close. 4. The croc snapped his jaws. 5. I jumped back scared. 32 words I, my

Clue words ______________________________ Thoughts/actions: stared, gaped, seen, jumped ____________________________ Whose thoughts are known? I ________________ Back to Concept Dev Definitions 2 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. 136 figure out 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. Narrator Clue Words 1st Person (one or many) I, my, me, mine, we, our, ours Joe, Sarah, he, she, they Checking for Understanding Identify the narrator. 1 2 3 3rd Person Read the text, paying attention to who is telling the story. Identify narrator clue words. (circle) Determine whose thoughts are known. (underline thoughts or actions) Narrator: 3rd person limited Narrator: 3rd person limited A. 1. Jack is a famous bush pilot. 2. He likes to tell stories about the time he landed in a mangrove swamp. 3. It took two days to get the plane out. 4. Jack also landed next to a mob of kangaroos. 5. The animals came up and beat on the plane with their paws. 48 B. 1. Anna planned to visit the big city. 2. She would see tall buildings. 3. The many cars, trucks and buses would be loud. 4. She hoped to eat at a caf.

5. Many different foods would be there. 6. Anna also wanted to try some new fish. 2 3 How did I/you identify the narrator clue words? How did I/you determine whose thoughts are known? 41 words words Jack, he, Clue words ______________________________ Thoughts/actions: likes to tell, landed ________________________ Whose thoughts Jack are known? _________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. Anna, she Clue words ______________________________ Thoughts/actions:planned, hoped, wanted to try ________________________ Whose thoughts Anna are known? _________________ 137 Back to Concept Dev 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. Narrator Clue Words 1st Person (one or many) I, my, me, mine, we, our, ours Read the text, paying attention to who is telling the story. Identify narrator clue words. (circle) Determine whose thoughts are known. (underline thoughts or actions) Narrator: 3rd person omniscient A. 1. Huey and his brothers went down to the river. 2. Huey was excited to try out his new fishing rod. 3. Brother Dewey was glad because he could bring some worms from his garden. 4. Brother Louie just wanted to swim. 5. His brothers told him he was scaring away the fish. 6. Louie was mad, and ran further downstream. 55 words

Huey, Dewey, Louie, he Clue words ______________________________ Thoughts/actions: excited, glad, mad ________________________ Whose thoughts are known? Huey, Dewey, & Louie __________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. Joe, Sarah, he, she, they Checking for Understanding Identify the narrator. 1 2 3 3rd Person 2 3 How did I/you identify the narrator clue words? How did I/you determine whose thoughts are known? Narrator: 3rd person omniscient B. 1. Adam thought it was a great day for walking in the park. 2. Suddenly Maria popped out from behind the bushes. 3. Maria felt it was great fun to surprise Adam. 4. Then her friend Anabel stepped out from behind the bushes. 5. She had taken a photo of Adam jumping. 6. Anabel believed it was a great picture. 53 words Clue words ______________________________ Adam, Maria, Anabel, she Thoughts/actions: thought, felt, believed ________________________ Adam, Maria, Anabel Whose thoughts are known? _________________ 138 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Checking for Understanding Identify the narrator. 1 2 3 1

Read the text, paying attention to who is telling the story. Identify narrator clue words. (circle) Determine whose thoughts are known. (underline thoughts or actions) How did I/you determine the purpose for reading? 2 How did I/you locate information that matches the purpose? 4 How did I/you ensure my/your response matched the purpose? 1. Robert lay awake in his bed, listening to the sounds of the night. 2. He tried every way he could to think happy things. 3. He thought of his dog, Ginger, and how she lay at the foot of his bed. 4. He thought of the eggs his mother would cook for breakfast. 5. He thought of the songs his mother would sing when he was little. 6. But always, just as he was about to fall asleep, the owl hoots, frog croaks and wolf howls would disturb him and make him afraid to close his eyes. Application The characters feelings can best be described as. A friendly B fearful C happy D sad Explain what words in the text give you a lay clue to how he awake, disturb him, afraid to close eyes feels.____________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ 95 words Robert, he Clue words: ____________________ ______________________________ Thoughts/actions: tried, ______________ thought, disturb him, make ____________________________ him afraid Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. x ____________________________________________

1st person 3rd person limited 3rd person omniscient 139 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. 1 Identifying the narrator will help you know what and how much will be told. Jake and I went to the beach to swim. I like to ride the waves into shore. It is so much fun. But I know Jake doesnt like that so much. He likes to play in the sand. (In this text, you only learn whats happening through the eyes of I, but you also feel what hes feeling.) The two boys, both 10 years old, went to the beach to swim. The taller one likes to ride the waves, while the shorter one likes to build sandcastles.(In this text, you learn from an observer more about the characters such as their age and height. ) 2 Identifying the narrator will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to identify the narrator? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to identify the narrator? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. 140 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Identify the narrator. 1 2 3 Read the text, paying attention to who is telling the story. Identify narrator clue words. (circle) Determine whose thoughts are known. (underline thoughts or actions) Narrator: 1st person 1. Watch out! I heard my mother say. 2. That was my first memory. 3. It was the sound of my mothers voice warning the doctor. 4. He had sat me on the bed to check my eyes, and I was about to fall off! 5. Luckily the doctor caught me in time and I grew up to become a doctor myself. 6. But I always make sure to be careful with babies. 61 words I, my, me Clue words ______________________________

Thoughts/actions: heard, _________________________ grew up, make I sure Whose thoughts are known?_________________ A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. Narrator Clue Words 1st Person 3rd Person I, my, me, mine, we, our, ours Joe, Sarah, he, she, they (one or many) Extended Thinking Erin thinks the narrator of the text above is using 3rd person omniscient because its talking about the doctor and mother. Do you agree? Why or why not? __________________________________________________________________ The narrator clue words are I, my, me. These do not refer to doctor or mother. __________________________________________________________________ Although these characters are mentioned in the story, their thoughts are not given. Summary Closure What did you learn today about identifying the narrator? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. 141 Word Bank narrator first-person third-person story 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Identify the narrator. 1 2 3

Read the text, paying attention to who is telling the story. Identify narrator clue words. (circle) Determine whose thoughts are known. (underline thoughts or actions) Narrator: 3rd person limited A. 1. Im not waiting around any longer, Mia announced, and Adam watched her hurry to music practice.2.Adam planned to follow, but he felt not right away. 3. He had to re-string his guitar and change into a new outfit that would make him feel like a rock star. 44 words Narrator: 1st person B. 1. My dad could be a champion weightlifter. 2. His muscles are as hard as rocks. 3. Check this out! he says with a smile, and Milton and I try to punch his stomach. 4. But we only hurt our hands. 5. My dad is tough! 41 A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. Narrator Clue Words 1st Person 3rd Person I, my, me, mine, we, our, ours Joe, Sarah, he, she, they words Mia, Adam, I, he, he Clue words ______________________________ Thoughts/actions: _________________________ watched, felt, feel like Adam Whose thoughts are known?_________________ My, he, I, we, my Clue words ______________________________ try to punch, hurt Thoughts/actions: _________________________ I Whose thoughts are known?_________________ (one or many) Narrator: 3rd person omniscient C. 1. Anna was sixteen, and very pretty. 2. She was proud of her long hair and brushed it a lot. 3. Monika was tall and brown, and moved her arms and legs quickly like a colt. 4. Tina was thirteen. 5. She was shy and didnt talk much. 6. Samantha was the youngest and thought she was the cats meow 1. 54 words Clue words _________________________________________________________ Anna, Monika, Tina, Samantha, she Thoughts/actions: ___________________________________

proud, moved quickly, shy, thought Whose thoughts are known?____________________________________________ Anna, Monika, Tina, Samantha Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. 142 (idiom) as perfect as the cats meow 2014 All rights reserved. ndependent Practice (continued) Remember the Concept Identify the narrator. 1 2 3 Read the text, paying attention to who is telling the story. Identify narrator clue words. (circle) Determine whose thoughts are known. (underline thoughts or actions) Narrator: 3rd person limited A. 1. Up until the accident, I was having a great afternoon. 2. My dad was driving our car when a truck went through a stop sign and smashed into us. 3. Both my dad and I were injured. 35 words I, my, our Clue words ______________________________ Thoughts/ was having, went, smashed, were injured actions:______________________________________ I ___________ _________________________ Whose thoughts are known?_________________ Narrator: 3rd person omniscient Narrator: 1st person B. 1. Mary turned around to stare at Martha, and she saw the faces in the old portraits looking back at her. 2. They made her feel creepy. 3. Martha did not notice Marys look of surprise. 4. She just kept on talking about the big old house and how much she thought Mary would like it. A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. Narrator Clue Words 1st Person 3rd Person

I, my, me, mine, we, our, ours Joe, Sarah, he, she, they 52 words Clue words ______________________________ Mary, Martha, she, they, Thoughts/ turned, saw, feel, notice, actions:______________________________________ kept, thought ___________ _________________________ Mary and Martha Whose thoughts are known?_________________ (one or many) C. 1. Howie had come face-to-face with the bully at school. 2. He didnt like being pushed around or called names, but he didnt want to fight either. 3. So he said, Youre picking on the wrong guy, and walked away from him. 41 words Howie, he Clue words _________________________________________________________ Thoughts/actions: ___________________________________ like, want, walked Howie Whose thoughts are known?____________________________________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. 143 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Narrator: 3rd person limited A. 1. Belle felt lonely and afraid. 2. The Beast looked terrible and mean. 3. She shuddered when looking at him. 4. Yet one month later, she found she liked his pleasant voice and kind helpfulness. Belle, Beast, she, him Clue words ___________________________________ Thoughts/actions: _____________________________ felt lonely and afraid, Whose thoughts areliked known? Belle ____________________ 40 words Narrator: 3rd person omniscient B. 1. Oh, said Michael. I see what you mean. 2. But he was pretending. 3. He didnt really get the point. 4. On the other hand, Mrs ODonnell, his teacher, continued explaining the life cycle of animals because she could see that he wasnt understanding. 5. She saw the blank look in his eyes. 51 words

A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. Michael, Mrs ODonnell, I, he, Clue words ___________________________________ she, pretending, get, continued, see, Thoughts/actions: saw ______________________________ Michael and Mrs Whose thoughts are known? O. ____________________ Extended Thinking Rewrite the following passage from 3rd person limited to 1st person. 1. Miles was a station manager near Mount Isa. 2. He was tall, muscular and always wore a wide-brimmed hat to keep the sun off his bald head. 3. He was proud of his ability to raise his sheep by maintaining good grazing land for them. 43 words I run a station near Mount Isa. I am tall, muscular, and like to wear ______________________________________________________________ a wide-brimmed hat to keep the sun off my bald head. I am proud ______________________________________________________________ of the sheep I raise and my ability to find good grazing land for ______________________________________________________________ them. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. 144 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Narrator: 3rd person limited A. 1. At that, Rogers thought changed direction, and his anger lessened. 2. He felt his cheeks cool off. 3. Now, Roger looked at Jasmine, who had explained what happened last night. 4. He felt that he could talk calmly now about the whole ordeal1. 40 Roger, Jasmine, he Clue words ___________________________________ Thoughts/actions: changed, _______________________________ lessened, felt, looked, talk Whose thoughts are known?____________________ Roger words Narrator: 3rd person omniscient

B. 1. Caroline knew her blue dress looked fine. 2. She felt it matched her eyes. 3. Jack was wearing a white suit. 4. He tried to look strong without being stiff. 5. At the dance, their friend Gus was the DJ. 6. He loved to play all kinds of music and watch his friends dance. 50 words A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. Caroline, Jack, Gus, he, she Clue words ___________________________________ Thoughts/actions: knew, felt, wearing, tried, loved, watch ______________________________ Caroline , Jack & Whose thoughts are known? Gus ____________________ Extended Thinking Rewrite the following passage from 1st person to 3rd person limited. 1. When I was young, I did a lot of walking in the bush. 2. My friends called me Bush Boy, but my real name is Ethan. 3. I learned to follow animal trails, to stay away from kangaroos, and to build a fire. 4. I listened to many sounds and learned to recognise cicadas, cockatoos, and even magpies. 56 words Ethan, who was called Bush Boy by his friends, did a lot of walking _______________________________________________________________________ in the bush when he was young. He learned to follow animal trails, _______________________________________________________________________ to stay away from kangaroos, and to build a fire. He liked to listen _______________________________________________________________________ to the sounds of cicadas, cockatoos and even magpies. ___________________________________________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. 145 Definitions 1 difficult situation 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept Narrator: 1st person A. 1. When I stepped out into the bright sunlight from the darkness of the movie theatre, my brain could think of only two things: what the superheroes did in the movie and what I should do with my life. I, my Clue words ___________________________________

Thoughts/actions:stepped, _______________________________ think, did, do Whose thoughts are known?____________________ I 37 words Narrator: 3rd person omniscient B. 1. Crystal blushed, and was unhappy. 2. She saw that she had offended her sister, and did not want to say anything more about the gift from their mother. 3. Daria too was unhappy. 4. She was questioning her own feelings and her speech when she exploded in anger with her sister. 5. The gift left both girls upset. 54 words A narrator is the person who tells the story. A first-person narrator is a character in the story. A third-person narrator is an observer outside the story. Limited: narrator describes the thoughts of one character. Omniscient: narrator describes the thoughts of all characters. Crystal, Daria, she Clue words ___________________________________ Thoughts/actions: blushed, unhappy, saw, offended, was questioning, exploded ________________________________________________ Whose thoughts are known?Crystal, Daria, narrator ____________________ Extended Thinking Rewrite the following passage from 3rd person limited to 3rd person omniscient. 1. Noah and Cooper grew up in Cairns and worked in the sugar cane fields. 2. Noah remembers one great adventure. 3. He and Cooper decided to wade across the mangrove swamp. 4. Cooper fell in the water, and Noah had to rescue him. 5. He always teased Cooper about having slippery feet. 48 words Noah grew up in Cairns and worked in the sugar cane fields with his friend Cooper. Noah _______________________________________________________________________ remembers when they waded across a mangrove swamp and Cooper fell in and Noah had to _______________________________________________________________________ rescue him. Cooper thinks it was a dumb idea to try to cross the swamp and does not ________________________ _________________________________________ consider it a great adventure. _________________________________________________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature1610.1 Identify the narrator. 146 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will identify the language features of imaginative text. Content Descriptor:

Year 5 ACELY 1701 Identify and explain characteristic text structures and language features used in imaginative, informative and persuasive texts to meet the purpose of the text Embedded Content Descriptor: Prerequisite(s): Year 4 ACELT 1690 Identify characteristic features used in imaginative, informative and persuasive texts to meet the purpose of the text. Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: This lesson should be taught after the unit on figurative language, and before the lessons on using adjective phrases and adding descriptions to writing. Students will have a basis then for adding phrases and longer descriptions to the imaginative writing they do at the end of this unit. This lesson also builds on the language features of imaginative text studied in Year 4; but now we go more deeply into figurative language and adjectives to build the descriptions. Vocabulary Academic: identify Content: imaginative text, language features Support: vivid EDI Lesson Overview A147 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will identify1 the language features of imaginative text. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does identify mean? Identify means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge Imaginative text tells a story. Which text below is an example of imaginative text? Imaginative text A. (also known as narrative text) includes stories that are realistic (real-world events) and fantastic (imaginary events) B. Emu Facts: An emu is the secondlargest bird in the world, after the ostrich. It is native to Australia.

It cannot fly. Edward the Emu Edward the emu was enjoying the grasses on the plains. Suddenly an eagle swooped low over him. He knew he had to run away. Make the Connection Students, you already know how to recognise imaginative text. Now, we will identify the language features of imaginative text. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text. 147 find 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development Language features of imaginative text help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Dialogue tags show when characters are speaking. Connectives signal time or movement in the story. Figurative language is used to create an image or feeling. Adjectives are used to describe characters, settings or Identify things. the language features of imaginative text. 1. Once upon a time, Lizzy the lizard was crawling along the sandy ground near the river when a long brown tree branch fell on the green lizards tail. 2. Lizzy wiggled around trying to get loose. 3. Im stuck, she thought. 4. Then she heard some splashing at the river. 5. I hope a crocodile doesnt find me for dinner, she said to herself with a shudder. Dialogue tags He said, she explained, stated the man, yelled Adam, thought Elmo Connectives First, then, soon, suddenly, once, next, an hour later, meanwhile Figurative language Tall as an oak, fog like an eggshell, he is a tough nut Adjectives Green, long, dangerous, pretty, older, faster, sad

Checking for Understanding Which sentence below has a dialogue tag? A Which sentence below has figurative language? B How do you know? 6. Soon, Kika the kangaroo came hopping along. 7. What happened to you? asked Kika, seeing the small lizard curled up A The ocean was choppy today, complained the old fisherman. B The ocean was a rollercoaster for our boat today. like a green bump against the thick branch. 90 words Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text. Examples of Language Features 148 In your own words, what is the purpose of language features of imaginative text? The purpose of language features of imaginative text is to _______. 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Examples of Language Features Language features of imaginative text help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Dialogue tags show when characters are speaking. Connectives signal time or movement in the story. Figurative language is used to create an image or feeling. Adjectives are used to describe characters, settings or things. Dialogue tags He said, she explained, stated the man, yelled Adam, thought Elmo Connectives First, then, soon, suddenly, once, next, an hour later, meanwhile Figurative language Tall as an oak, fog like an eggshell, he is a

tough nut Adjectives Green, long, dangerous, pretty, older, faster, sad Identify the language features of imaginative text. 1 2 3 Read the passage, looking for language features of imaginative text. Identify dialogue tags. (underline) Identify connectives. (circle) Checking for Understanding 2 1. Ethan was 16 years old and could read and write. 2. He was as strong as a crocodile. 3. But he didnt know what kind of useful work to 3 Application do as a job. 1. The description of Ethans reaction to the music is made more vivid2 by: 4. What should I do? he wondered. 5. One day, he heard the village elder Balan play the didgeridoo. 6. His father said, The deep, soothing sound Balan makes will send you on a journey inward. 7. Ethan closed his eyes and listened. 8. Suddenly, his tight shoulders relaxed and his chattering mind got quiet. A listening to his father B showing what happens to his shoulders and mind C listening with eyes closed D having a dream 2. Which words from the text support the comparison of light to waves? lights flowing like waves ____________________________________________ 9. Inside, he saw lights flowing like waves. 10. Then he seemed to enter a dream where he saw himself driving a truck across the Outback. Australian wordsCurriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text. How did I/you identify dialogue tags? How did I/you identify connectives? 149 105 Definitions 2 strong, clear 2014 All rights reserved.

kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Examples of Language Features Language features of imaginative text help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Dialogue tags show when characters are speaking. Connectives signal time or movement in the story. Figurative language is used to create an image or feeling. Adjectives are used to describe characters, settings or things. Dialogue tags He said, she explained, stated the man, yelled Adam, thought Elmo Connectives First, then, soon, suddenly, once, next, an hour later, meanwhile Figurative language Tall as an oak, fog like an eggshell, he is a tough nut Adjectives Green, long, dangerous, pretty, older, faster, sad Identify the language features of imaginative text. 1 2 3 Read the passage, looking for language features of imaginative text. Identify figurative language. (double underline) Identify adjectives that describe. (box) Checking for Understanding 4 1. Ethan was 16 years old and could read and write. 2. He was as 5 strong as a crocodile. 3. But he didnt know what kind of useful work to do as a job. How did I/you identify figurative language? How did I/you identify adjectives that describe? Application 1. The description of the didgeridoo is made more vivid by: 4. What should I do? he wondered. 5. One day, he heard the village elder Balan play the didgeridoo. 6. His father said, The deep, soothing sound Balan makes will send you on a journey inward. 7. Ethan closed his eyes and listened. 8. Suddenly, his tight shoulders relaxed and his chattering mind got

quiet. A saying who is playing it B describing the sound as soothing and deep C listening with eyes closed D by asking the man to play it again 2. Which words from the text support the comparison of Ethan to a crocodile? strong as a crocodile ____________________________________________ 9. Inside, he saw lights flowing like waves. 10. Then he seemed to enter a dream where he saw himself driving a truck across the Outback. Australian wordsCurriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text. 150 105 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Read the passage, then rewrite two sentences. Add a language feature to each one to make it more imaginative. 1. Wally the wallaby loved to play in the bush. 2. He would munch on leaves and grasses all day long. 3. But water was scarce. 4. He had to hop a long distance to reach the water hole. 5. There he met Application 1. What language feature did you add to your first sentence and why? I added adjectives thick and __________________________________________ green to give more detail __________________________________________ about the forest. other wallabies, and they talked about life in the 2. What language feature did you add to your second sentence and why? bush. I added a simile to help the __________________________________________ 48 reader see how scarce water __________________________________________ was by comparing it to rainbows. words __________________________________________ 1 : Sentence ___ Wally the wallaby loved to play in the thick green ___________________________________________________________ bush. ___________________________________________________________

Examples of Language Features Dialogue tags He said, she explained, stated the man, yelled Adam, thought Elmo Sentence: ___: 3 ___________________________________________________________ But water was as scarce as rainbows. Connectives First, then, soon, suddenly, once, next, an hour later, meanwhile ___________________________________________________________ Figurative language Tall as an oak, fog like an eggshell, he is a tough nut Adjectives Green, long, dangerous, pretty, older, faster, sad Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text. 151 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Language features of imaginative text help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Dialogue tags show when characters are speaking. Connectives signal time or movement in the story. Figurative language is used to create an image or feeling. Adjectives are used to describe characters, settings or things. 1 Identifying the language features of imaginative text will help you understand what you read and improve your writing. Now, you can fly, said Peter to Wendy, crowing like a loud rooster. This text has many language features that help you see and feel whats happening. You could also write the next few sentences to continue the story. 2 Identifying the language features of imaginative text will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to identify the language features of imaginative text? (PairShare) Why is it relevant to identify language features of imaginative text? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text.

152 2014 All rights reserved. Remember the Concept Skill Closure Identify the language features of imaginative text. 1 2 3 4 5 Read the passage, looking for language features of imaginative text. Identify dialogue tags. (underline) Identify connectives. (circle) Identify figurative language. (double underline) Identify adjectives that describe. (box) Sam the Starfish 1. Sam the Starfish likes to eat tasty coral. 2. One day, he found a beautiful, red coral. 3. But the scared coral saw him coming. 4. She said, Please dont eat me. 5. I make the reef beautiful with my colour. 6. Sam liked the red colour of the coral too. 7. Okay, said Sam. 8. I will have lunch somewhere else. 9. So, he floated away until he was like a far star Language features of imaginative text help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Dialogue tags show when characters are speaking. Connectives signal time or movement in the story. Figurative language is used to create an image or feeling. Adjectives are used to describe characters, settings or things. of Language Examples Features Dialogue tags He said, she explained, stated the man, yelled Adam, thought Elmo Connectives First, then, soon, suddenly, once, next, an hour later, meanwhile Figurative language Tall as an oak, fog like an eggshell, he is a tough nut Adjectives Green, long, dangerous, pretty, older, faster, sad

in the sky to the coral. 72 words Extended Thinking Which ending for this story uses two language features? A The red coral lived longer. B Then, Sam was hungry as a whale. C Now, the coral was safe. Word Bank Summary Closure What did you learn today about identifying the language features of imaginative text? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text. 153 language features imaginative text see and feel what happens 2014 All rights reserved. Remember the Concept Independent Practice Identify the language features of imaginative text. 1 2 3 4 5 Read the passage, looking for language features of imaginative text. Identify dialogue tags. (underline) Identify connectives. (circle) Identify figurative language. (double underline) Identify adjectives that describe. (box) The Colours of the Rainbow 1. Long ago, when men first came to Australia, it was a big, sandy, dry island. 2. When it rained, they saw the rainbow like a bridge across the sky. 3. The men were sad that their land had very little colour. 4. They talked to the great spirits of the sky. 5. Why, O Great Sky, can we not have a world as colourful as the rainbow? asked the men. 6. Thunder and lightning filled the air. 7. Then, a giant rainbow formed across the sky. 8. Men of the dry land, said the Sky in a loud voice. 9. I have heard your cries for colour. 10. Today, I ask the great rainbow to share its beauty with you. 11. Suddenly, the rainbow shattered into drops of bright colours, falling into the waters. 12. Each colourful piece grew in the warm water to Language features of imaginative text help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Dialogue tags show when characters are speaking. Connectives signal time or movement in the story. Figurative language is used to create an image or feeling. Adjectives are used to describe characters, settings

Examples or things. of Language Features Dialogue tags He said, she explained, stated the man, yelled Adam, thought Elmo Connectives First, then, soon, suddenly, once, next, an hour later, meanwhile Figurative language Tall as an oak, fog like an eggshell, he is a tough nut Adjectives Green, long, dangerous, pretty, older, faster, sad Application become multi-coloured coral. 13. Today, that place is known as the Great The description of the rainbow is made more vivid by: Barrier Reef. A saying it is giant. B saying it shattered. C saying it was like a bridge. D saying the rainbow would share its beauty. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text. 145 words 154 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept The Snake and the Caterpillar 1. Once, a small, sticky caterpillar and a long snake were talking in the garden. 2. The snake said, I am much bigger than you, and I can move faster. 3. That may be, said the caterpillar. 4. But size and speed arent everything. 5. The next day the caterpillar went into his chrysalis. 6. Soon, he saw that he had beautiful wings. 7. He flew down to where the snake was crawling like a wiggly rope on the ground. 8. Sometimes, he said with a smile, we can grow and become something more. 9. Then, the proud snake realised that being bigger and faster was not as important as growing. 95 words Extended Thinking Rewrite the sentence and add the suggested language features to

make it more imaginative and easier to follow. (answers will vary) 1. The evil queen decided to ask her mirror a question. (add a connective) One day, the evil queen decided to ask her mirror a ___________________________________________________________________________ 2.question. Who is the fairest of all? (add dialogue) ___________________________________________________________________________ Who is the fairest of all? said the queen. 3. The mirror said it was Snow White. (add a connective and dialogue) Then, the mirror said, Snow White is the fairest. ___________________________________________________________________________ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text. 155 Language features of imaginative text help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Dialogue tags show when characters are speaking. Connectives signal time or movement in the story. Figurative language is used to create an image or feeling. Adjectives are used to describe characters, settings Examples or things. of Language Features Dialogue tags He said, she explained, stated the man, yelled Adam, thought Elmo Connectives First, then, soon, suddenly, once, next, an hour later, meanwhile Figurative language Tall as an oak, fog like an eggshell, he is a tough nut Adjectives Green, long, dangerous, pretty, older, faster, sad 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Alices Trip 1. One day, Alice fell into a deep rabbit hole that curled down like a loopy coaster. 2. It opened into a big underground world. 3. She drank something to shrink in size. 4. Then, she could go through the door. 5. What is this? she asked out loud. 6. Suddenly, a rabbit ran by carrying a loudly ticking watch. 7. Im late, Im late,

for a very important date! he said. 8. Wait, said Alice. 9. Where am I? 10. You are now here, said the rabbit, still in a hurry. 11. Alice decided to explore. 12. Very soon, she saw a caterpillar sitting on a leaf. 13. He was very big and his smile was like a watermelon slice. 14. Who are you? he asked her with a big smile. 118 words Extended Thinking Rewrite the sentence and add the suggested language features to make it more imaginative and easier to follow. (answers will vary) 1. The evil queen decided to ask her mirror a question. (add adjectives) The tall, dark, evil queen decided to ask her magic mirror a question. ___________________________________________________________________________ 2. Who is the fairest of all? (add figurative language) ___________________________________________________________________________ Who is as fair as the moon and just as bright? 3. The queen gave her an apple that put her in a sleep. (add adjectives and figurative language) The tricky queen gave her a poisoned apple that put her in a deep ___________________________________________________________________________ sleep like death. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text. 156 Language features of imaginative text help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Dialogue tags show when characters are speaking. Connectives signal time or movement in the story. Figurative language is used to create an image or feeling. Adjectives are used to describe characters, settings Examples or things. of Language Features Dialogue tags He said, she explained, stated the man, yelled Adam, thought Elmo Connectives First, then, soon, suddenly, once, next, an hour later, meanwhile Figurative language Tall as an oak, fog like an eggshell, he is a tough nut Adjectives Green, long, dangerous, pretty, older, faster, sad 2014 All rights reserved.

Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept The Hobbit 1. Bilbo Baggins was a hobbit. 2. He was not quite human and not quite elf but still short like a dwarf. 3. In particular, he had big feet. 4. That was good because he did a lot of walking. 5. Also, he liked to tell long, exciting stories. 6. One day, he told his nephew Frodo, Long ago, I went on a great adventure with Gandalf the wizard to defeat the greedy dragon, Smaug. 7. Frodo wanted to know more. 8. It all started on a quiet day in The Shire where I lived, said Bilbo. 9. Then, he told of his dangerous trip with Gandalf the wizard, dwarfs and elves to find the treasure under the mountain. 10. He explained how he was the burglar one who could sneak in and get things without others knowing. 11. In addition, he found a special golden ring that had dark energy that pulled his mind like a magnet. 147 words Extended Thinking Rewrite this text to be more imaginative. Use all four of the language features. The octopus waited behind the coral. A small fish swam by. The octopus reached out with his tentacles. He grabbed the fish. The fish asked him to let him go. The octopus was surprised by the request. He let him go. Answers will vary- The sticky octopus waited behind the red coral. Then, a small blue fish swam by. The big octopus reached out with his sucker-filled tentacles. He grabbed the fish and reeled him in like a fishing rod. The scared fish said, please let me go. The octopus was surprised by the brave request. He let him go quickly as if he was stung. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1701.1 Identify the language features of imaginative text. 157 Language features of imaginative text help the reader see and feel what is happening in the story. Dialogue tags show when characters are speaking. Connectives signal time or movement in the story. Figurative language is used to create an image or feeling. Adjectives are used to describe characters, settings Examples or things. of Language Features Dialogue tags He said, she explained, stated the man, yelled Adam, thought Elmo Connectives First, then, soon, suddenly, once, next, an hour later, meanwhile Figurative language Tall as an oak, fog like an eggshell, he is a

tough nut Adjectives Green, long, dangerous, pretty, older, faster, sad 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will add descriptions to writing. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELA 1508 Understand how noun groups/phrases and adjective groups/phrases can be expanded in a variety of ways to provide a fuller description of the person, place, thing or idea. Embedded Content Descriptor: Prerequisite(s): Year 4 ACELA 1493 Understand that the meaning of sentences can be enriched through the use of noun groups/phrases and verb groups/phrases and prepositional phrases. Year 4 ACELA 1493 Use grammatical features, including different types of verb groups/phrases, noun groups/phrases, adverb groups/phrases and prepositional phrases for effective descriptions as related to purpose and context (for example development of a characters actions or a description in a report). Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: This symbol denotes the recommendation to proceed to Skill Development after teaching part of the Concept Development. This teaching strategy is referred to as looping. Click on the symbol to be sent to the correct location in the lesson. Vocabulary Academic: replace, describe Content: descriptions, specific, choose Support: remnants, sediment, climate, oceanographer, determined, trek, immigrants EDI Lesson Overview A158 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will add descriptions1 to writing. Read the learning objective to your partner. What are descriptions? Descriptions are __________. Activate Prior Knowledge Remember the Concept Read the pair of sentences.

Underline the nouns. Circle the adjectives A noun names a person, place or thing. An adjective describes a noun. 1. Two dogs sat on the front verandah of the run-down house. 2. The best blueberries grow under the oak tree next to the deep Make the Connection Students, you already know how to identify nouns and adjectives. Now, we will use nouns and adjectives to add descriptions to our writing. river. Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1508.1 Add descriptions to writing. 158 words that add more detail about writing 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development 1 Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. A noun adds description by being more specific2. Less Specific More Specific I tasted the fruit. I tasted the apple. I love the food my aunt makes. I love the hamburgers my aunt makes. The animals were grazing in the pasture. The sheep were grazing in the pasture. Amy bought clothes on her shopping trip. Amy bought dresses on her shopping trip. Checking for Understanding Which sentence adds description with a more specific noun? A My dad has a vehicle. B My dad has a truck. In your own words, how does a noun

add description? A noun adds description by ___________. Go to Skill Dev 1 Definitions 2 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1508.1 Add descriptions to writing. 159 detailed or exact 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development 2 Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. An adjective adds description by giving more details about the noun. Less Detail More Detail I tasted the apple. I tasted the juicy apple. I love the hamburgers my aunt makes. I love the sizzling hamburgers my aunt makes. The sheep were grazing in the pasture. The white sheep were grazing in the pasture. Amy bought dresses on her shopping trip. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1508.1 Add descriptions to writing. Amy bought two dresses on her shopping trip. 160 Checking for Understanding Which sentence adds description with an adjective? A I need a soft yarn. B The tractor was still in the shed. In your own words, how does an adjective add description? An adjective adds description by _______. Go to Skill Dev 2 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice 1

Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. A noun adds description by being more specific. Add descriptions to writing. 1 2 3 Checking for Understanding Read the sentence. Select the more specific noun. (circle) Re-read the sentence with the new description. 2 How did I/you select the more specific noun? 1. Miles snuck carefully through the (plants/roses) to get close to the old (mansion/building). 2. He crept silently inside and walked into the (room/kitchen). 3. The walls were covered with (stuff/cobwebs). 4. Miles felt a draft, and there, in front of him, was a (monster/person). 5. As he turned to flee, the creature grabbed his (limb3/arm) with its (claws/hands). 6. Pulling free, Miles tore his Go to Concept Dev 2 (clothes/shirt) as he ran back through the roses. 71 words Definitions 3 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1508.1 Add descriptions to writing. 161 body part, arm or leg 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice 2 Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. An adjective adds description by giving more details about the noun. Checking for Understanding Add descriptions to writing. 1 2 3 Read the sentence. Create or select an adjective that adds detail about the noun. (Use word bank) Re-read the sentence with the new description added. 2 How did I/you create or select an adjective that adds detail about the noun? 1. Miles snuck carefully through thethorny __________ Word Bank roses to get close to thedeserted

__________ mansion. Sentences 2. He crept silently inside and walked into the cluttered kitchen. 3. The walls were covered __________ cold with cobwebs. 4. Miles felt a __________ draft, and there, in front of him, was ahorrible __________ monster. 5. As he turned to flee, the creature 1-3 Sentences 4-6 deserted thorny cluttered horrible best cold razor-sharp razor-sharp grabbed his arm with its __________ claws 6. Pulling free, Miles tore hisbest __________ shirt as he ran back through the roses. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1508.1 Add descriptions to writing. 162 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. A noun adds description by being more specific. An adjective adds description by giving more details about the noun. 1 Adding descriptions to writing will help your writing become more interesting. Birds flew over the house. Crows flew over the haunted house. 2 Adding descriptions to writing will help you do well on tests. Understanding the Relevance Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to add descriptions to writing? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to add descriptions to writing? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1508.1 Add descriptions to writing. 163 2014 All rights reserved.

Skill Closure Remember the Concept Add descriptions to writing. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentence. Select the more specific noun. (circle) Create or select an adjective that adds detail about the noun. (Use word bank) Re-read the sentence with the new description added. 1. My family and I took a holiday to the (beach/Bondi Beach). 2. We Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. A noun adds description by being more specific. An adjective adds description by giving more details about the noun. packed the car soft full of __________ blankets and toys along with all our favourite snacks. yummy 3. When we go to the beach, Mum likes to read (books/mysteries) and blazing sunbake. 4. Dad always fishes for __________ cod. 5. Later, he will cook the fish over a _________ fire. 6. My sister and I like to play (Snap/cards). 7. crashing One of our many activities is to make (sandcastles/buildings) with shovels. Word8. We also like to swim in the __________ waves when the sun is crashing blazing soft yummy Bank hot. 91 words Extended Thinking Sam claims that fish would be a good replacement for cod in sentence 4. Do you agree or not? Why (Pair-Share) Summary Closure Fish would not be a good replacement for cod because cod is a more specific word. What did you learn today about adding descriptions to writing? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1508.1 Add descriptions to writing. 164 Word Bank noun adjective writing interesting descriptions specific 2014 All rights reserved.

Independent Practice Remember the Concept Add descriptions to writing. 1 2 3 4 Read the sentence. Select the more specific noun. (circle) Create or select an adjective that adds detail about the noun. (Use word bank) Re-read the sentence with the new description added. Leanne Armand Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. A noun adds description by being more specific. An adjective adds description by giving more details about the noun. 1. Leanne Armand was born on 20 February 1968 in Adelaide. 2. As a Cultural Connection Australian woman scientist: child, she spent time at the beach, collecting (seashells/things) and Dr. Leanne Armand is a marine scientist and an expert in the distribution of diatoms in the Southern Ocean. She is known for her contributions to the understanding of how the Southern Ocean dynamics and sea ice are linked to climate regions. tiny using them to set up museums at home. 3. Deciding to specialise in the study of __________ fossils, Armand examined the remnants 4 of algae past found in deep sea (sediments5/dirt). 4. She used these to discover http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leanne_Armand __________ climate6 conditions. 5. Her research has helped inform ocean (scientists/oceanographers7) about how sea ice helps drive __________ currents. 6. This affects fisheries and food webs. 7. The connections between sea surface temperatures and land climates are also affected. Word Bank past Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1508.1 Add descriptions to writing. ocean tiny 90 words 165

Definitions small parts still left materials that settle to the bottom of a body of water 6 typical weather in a region 7 scientist who study oceans 4 5 2014 All rights reserved. ndependent Practice (continued) Remember the Concept Add descriptions to writing. 1 Read the sentences. 2 Replace the bold word with more descriptive words from the word bank. 3 Re-read the sentence with the new description added. spicy curry _____________ 1. Maria brought hot food to the church bring-a-plate. Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. A noun adds description by being more specific. An adjective adds description by giving more details about the noun. ____________ hyper adj noun 2. The active dog almost got hit by the large truck . collie _____________blouse orange ____________ adj noun sparkly 3. I sat next to the lady in the coloured clothing. diamond _____________ neighbour kids adj ____________ noun history folder _____________ 4. The jeweller put a bright stone in the gold ring.

____________ adj Word Bank 5. I played with the nearby people until dinner. ____________ Adjectives Nouns sparkly collie noun kids 6. Polly took notes in orange her science notebook . neighbour blouse ____________ spicy folder noun hyper curry history diamond Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1508.1 Add descriptions to writing. noun _____________ adj _____________ adj 166 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Add descriptions to writing Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombat strong 1. The northern hairy-nosed wombat is found in Epping Forest. 2. It has __________ molars (back teeth) to grind and chew (grasses/plants). 3. Its Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. A noun adds description by being more specific. An adjective adds description by giving more details about the noun. powerful limbs and strong claws help it dig (tunnels/holes). 4. This wombat sizzling burrows in the ground to escape from the __________ heat of the day. 5. It also uses the tunnels to escape from (predators/dingoes). 6. Having poor eyesight, thesensitive wombat finds food at night with its __________ sense of smell. Word Bank strong sensitive

60 words sizzling Extended Thinking swer the questions below and shade in the correct box. 1. Which words could describe1 the waterfall? Water fell into the pool at the bottom of the waterfall. O river O foaming O smooth O high 2. Which words could describe the man? The man walked away slowly. O away O red-haired O patiently smiling Cultural Connection Endangered native species: The largest of the three wombat species is the northern hairy-nosed wombat, which averages about 32 kg and reaches more than one metre in length. Compared with the common wombat, northern hairynosed wombats have softer fur, longer and more pointed ears and a broader muzzle fringed with fine whiskers. http://www.ehp.qld.gov.au/wildlife/threatened-species/en dangered/northern_hairynosed_wombat/ O 3. Which word could you use to replace show? We saw an excellent show at the theatre. O ballet2 O car O dance O mountain Definitions 1 2 tell about a form of dance 4. Which word could you use to replace children? Australian Curriculum English helpful children washed the filthy car. Year 5 My Language 1508.1 Add descriptions O fatherto writing. O sons O neighbour O 167 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2

Remember the Concept Add descriptions to writing Eureka Stockade developed 1. In the 1850s, people came from all over the ___________ world to Victoria in hopes of getting rich. 2. Life in the goldfields was dangerous. 3. The (people/miners) had no say in the laws. Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. A noun adds description by being more specific. An adjective adds description by giving more details about the noun. 4. Before they could mine, they had to buy a licence. 5. If they didnt have one, they could mining be (punished/jailed or fined). 6. Arguing over this caused the Eureka Rebellion. 7. Thousands of miners came togetherbloody to burn their ___________ licences and raise their own Twenty-two flag. 8. On 3 December 1854, there was a brief ___________ battle at the Eureka mining camp where miners had built a wooden (stockade/yard). 9. ___________ miners and eight Word (men/soldiers) died. Bank bloody developed mining 10. Eureka is seen as the start of a democratic Australia. soldiers twenty-two Extended Thinking 121 words swer the questions below and shade in the correct box. 1. Which word(s) could describe department? Oliver went to a university known for its department. O Oliver O biology O university excellent 2. Which word(s) could describe the teacher? Ranjett, a teacher, lives in Sydney. O lives O new O young Ranjett O Cultural TheConnection Eureka Stockade is the name given to a rebellion by gold miners at Ballarat, Victoria, Australia. It took place at sunrise, on 3

December, 1854. The miners refused to pay a licence fee to look for gold. The miners said that the money for the licence was a tax, and that if they had to pay tax then they should be represented in the parliament. Irish miner Peter Lalor became the leader of the miners. They built a fort, or stockade, on Bakery Hill above the gold diggings on the Eureka gold lead. They were attacked by the British Army. More than 30 people were killed. O 3. Which word(s) could you use to replace paper? The paper showed where the gold was buried. O map O plan O outline O article 4. Which word(s) could you use to replace plants? In the spring, Amelia sowed1 seeds for plants. Australian Curriculum English O sloths O tomatoes O pigs O Year 5 Language 1508.1 vegetables Add descriptions to writing. Definitions 1 168 to scatter seed on the land 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept Add descriptions to writing Gold! Australian 1. The first major mineral (discovery/find) was a turning point for _________ society. 2. The initial stages of the gold rush were responsible for tremendous changes in the community. 3. Waves of (people/immigrants) Nouns and adjectives can be used to add descriptions to writing. A noun adds description by being more specific. An adjective adds description by giving more details about the noun. from countries other than England and Ireland arrived in Australia. 4. Determined prospectors from (Asia, Europe and America/countries)made the (trek/trip) to the goldfields of Ballarat and Bendigo inadvanced Victoria. 5. These modern people brought _________ skills and professions. 6. Thousands decided to stay and their descendants are _________ Australians. Word

Bank Australian 78 words modern advanced Extended Thinking ose words of your own to replace the bold adjectives and nouns. (Pair-Share) 1. Mary decided to go for a walk in the small, new place. adjective adjective noun 2. She wanted her nice, kind friend to go with her. adjective adjective noun 3. After their walk, they went to a nearby, small shop. adjective adjective 4. They sat outside with their drinks and ate hot tasty food. adjective adjective Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Language 1508.1 Add descriptions to writing. noun noun 169 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will explain how points of view affect the story. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELT 1610 Recognise that ideas in literary texts can be conveyed from different viewpoints, which can lead to different kinds of interpretations and responses. Embedded Content Descriptor: Prerequisite(s): Year 4 ACELT 1605 Discuss how authors and illustrators make stories exciting, moving and absorbing and hold readers interest by using various techniques, for example character development and plot tension. Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: This lesson should be taught after 1610.1 where students identify the narrator. Vocabulary Academic: Content: identify

point of view, perspective, first-person narrator, limited, omniscient Support: EDI Lesson Overview A170 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will explain1 how points of view affect the story. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does explain mean? Explain means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge The narrator of a story is the one who tells it. A. 1. I went fishing with my grandfather last week. 2. I learned how to use a fishing rod and reel. 3. I caught my first fish. 25 words Who is the narrator in Story A? A Ethan B grandfather C someone not in the story Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story. B. 1. Ethan went fishing with his grandfather last week. 2. He learned to use a fishing rod and reel. 3. He caught his first fish. 22 words Who is the narrator in Story B? A Ethan B grandfather C someone not in the story 170 Make the Connection Students, you already know how to identify the narrator. Now, we will explain how different points of view affect the story. Definitions 1 tell about 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development

Point of view (POV) is the perspective2 from which the story is told. A first-person narrator gives his or her own POV as a character in the story. A third-person limited3 narrator tells about the POV of one character. A third-person omniscient4 narrator tells about the POV of all characters. How Points of View Affects the StoryPOV FirstPerson Narrator I ThirdPerson Limited Narrator he, she Text I told my brothers they should build strong houses. But no! One wanted to build out of straw; the other out of wood. When that wolf showed up, I knew it was only a matter of time until they came running to my brick house. The third pig was smart. He knew to build his house out of bricks. He thought his brothers were stupid to use straw and wood. So, when the wolf showed up, the third pig turned out to be right. Once, there were three pigs. One was in a hurry so he built his house out Thirdof straw. The second pig wanted a Person natural look so he used wood. But the Omniscien third pig wanted a strong house, so he bricks. When the wolf showed up, t Narrator used he thought he would have some nice He, she Australian Curriculum English pork for lunch. But the third pig was too Year 5 Literature 1610.2 for him. Explain how points of view smart affect the story. What the reader knows Checking for Understanding In which example is the main character telling the story? How do you know? A Yesterday, I hiked to the river to go fishing. B Garth hiked to the river because he liked to go fishing. In your own words, what is point of view? Point of view is ___________. Narrator Clue Words 1st person = I, we

Reader knows only one characters thoughts as told by that character. 3rd person = he, she, they Reader knows one characters thoughts as told by a narrator, and sometimes knows the narrators opinion. Definitions Reader knows all characters thoughts and the narrators opinions. 171 2 3 4 view not many in number or amount all-knowing 2014 All rights reserved. POV What the reader knows First-Person Narrator I Reader knows only one characters thoughts as told by that character. Third-Person Limited Narrator he, she Reader knows one characters thoughts as told by a narrator, and sometimes know the narrators opinion. ThirdPerson Omniscient Narrator He, she Reader knows all characters thoughts and the narrators opinions. kill Development & Guided Practice Point of view (POV) is the perspective from which the story is told. Explain how points of view affect the story. 1 2 3

Read the stories, paying attention to the point of view. Identify5 the main characters thoughts in each story. (underline) Explain how points of view affect the story. (answer questions) Main character: Emu A. 1st Person: 1. I know I can run faster than a kangaroo. 2. Ill race him to find out who is faster. 3. My legs are longer. 22 words B. 3rd Person Limited: 1. The emu believes he can run faster than a kangaroo. 2. The emu wants to race. 3. He knows his legs are longer. 22 words Checking for Understanding 1 2 How did I/you identify the main characters thoughts? How did I/you explain how POV affects the story? C. 3rd Person Omniscient: 1. The emu believes his long legs will help him run faster. 2. The kangaroo thinks his hops are longer. 3. The other animals say they should race. 4. It will be a good race. 31 words In 1. 2. 3. which story do you learn: B& the emus thoughts? A, _______ C the kangaroos thoughts? ____ C B& the narrator is NOT a character?___ C Definitions 5 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story. 172 find 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) POV What the reader knows First-Person Narrator I Reader knows only one characters thoughts as told by that character.

Third-Person Limited Narrator he, she Reader knows one characters thoughts as told by a narrator, and sometimes know the narrators opinion. ThirdPerson Omniscient Narrator He, she Reader knows all characters thoughts and the narrators opinions. Point of view (POV) is the perspective from which the story is told. Explain how points of view affect the story. 1 2 3 Read the stories, paying attention to the point of view. Identify the main characters thoughts in each story. (underline) Explain how points of view affect the story. (answer questions) Main character: Freddy the Fish A. 1st Person: 1. If I nibble around the edge, then I can eat the whole worm. 2. I just have to be careful not to get caught on the hook. 26 words B. 3rd Person Limited: 1. Freddy the fish is careful when eating worms floating in the sea. 2. He nibbles around the edge and avoids the hook. 21 words Checking for Understanding 1 2 How did I/you identify the main characters thoughts? How did I/you explain how POV affects the story? C. 3rd Person Omniscient: 1. Freddy the fish tries to eat carefully to avoid the hook. 2. The fisherman shakes the line to move the hook and try to snag the fish. 3. The worm is barely alive, just wriggling on the hook. 4. Soon, it will be all over. 5. I wonder who will win? 47 words In which story do you learn: B& 1. the fishs thoughts?A, _______ C 2. the fishermans thoughts? ____ C 3. the narrator is NOT a character?___ B& C Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story.

173 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Checking for Understanding Explain how points of view affect the story. 1 Your teacher has asked you to write a story about A Day at the Beach from three different viewpoints. Here are your C rough drafts. 1. Which story gives the POV of only the main character? ____ A B 2. Which story gives the POV of all characters and the narrator? ____ 3. Which story gives the POV of the main character told by a narrator? ____ A How did I/you determine what the question or prompt is asking? 2 How did I/you determine the relevant information? 3 How did I/you answer the question? 4 How did I/you determine if all parts of the question have been answered? A Day at the Beach 1. It was a hot summer day. 2. Adam went with Mick to the beach. 3. Adam loved to swim and jumped in the water right away. 4. Mick liked shells. 5. He found a beautiful conch shell. 6. They both had a lot of fun. 40 words B A Day at the Beach 1. It was a hot summer day. 2. Adam went with Mick to the beach. 3. Adam jumped in the water right away. 4. Mick decided to look for shells. 5. He found a beautiful conch shell. 32 words C A Day at the Beach 1. It was a hot summer day. 2. My friend and I went to the beach. 3. My friend jumped in the water, but I decided to look for shells. 4. I found a beautiful conch shell. 33 words Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story. 174 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Point of view (POV) is the perspective from which the story is told. A first-person narrator gives his or her own POV as a character in the story. A third-person limited narrator tells about the POV of one character. A third-person omniscient narrator tells about the POV of all characters. 1 Explaining how points of view affect a story will

help you better understand what you read. Watching a movie, we see a character climbing to the top of a mountain: Just a bit more and Ill make it to the top, I thought. Stretch, climb! There, got it! 2 From the characters POV, it looks like he is trying to reach the top of a mountain. But we know he ishow really in a movie. We a different pointaofstory view. Explaining points ofhave view affect will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to explain how points of view affect a story? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to explain how points of view affect a story? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story. 175 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Explain how points of view affect the story. 1 2 3 Read the stories, paying attention to the point of view. Identify the main characters thoughts in each story. (underline) Explain how points of view affect the story. (answer questions) Main character: Lightning the Car A. 1st Person: 1. If I lean into the turn, then Ill take the lead in the race. 2. I have to be careful not to burn up my tyres too fast. 27 words B. 3rd Person Omniscient: 1. Lightning leans into the turn and is happy to take the lead in the race. 2. Bullet feels like he can catch him on the next turn. 3. Well keep watching closely. In which story do you learn: 27 words A&B 1. the cars thoughts? _______ B 2. the narrator is NOT a character?___ Point of view (POV) is the perspective from which the story is told.

A first-person narrator gives his or her own POV as a character in the story. A third-person limited narrator tells about the POV of one character. A third-person omniscient narrator tells about the POV of all characters. Extended Thinking Richard says Passage B is really third-person limited. Do you agree or not? Passage B shows the thoughts of two cars, Lightning and Bullet, and the narrator. It must be third-person omniscient. Word Bank point-of-view first person third-person limited Summary Closure What did you learn today about how points of view affect the story? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story. 176 third-person omniscient characters 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Explain how points of view affect the story. 1 2 3 Read the stories, paying attention to the point of view. Identify the main characters thoughts in each story. (underline) Explain how points of view affect the story. (answer questions) Main character: Lisa A. 1st Person: 1. Getting an A in this class is the most important thing. 2. If I do that, my mum will get me a mobile phone. 3. I really have to study hard. 29 words B. 3rd Person Limited: 1. Lisa believes it is important to get an A in her class. 2. She says her mum will get her a mobile phone if she does. 3. It is obvious she is studying hard. 32 words Point of view (POV) is the perspective from which the story is told. A first-person narrator gives his or her own POV as a character in the story. A third-person limited narrator tells about the POV of one character.

A third-person omniscient narrator tells about the POV of all characters. POV What the reader knows First-Person Narrator I Reader knows only one characters thoughts as told by that character. Third-Person Limited Narrator he, she Reader knows one characters thoughts as told by a narrator, and sometimes know the narrators opinion. ThirdPerson Omniscient Narrator He, she Reader knows all characters thoughts and the narrators opinions. C. 3rd Person Omniscient: 1. Lisa is working hard to get an A in her class. 2. She says her mum will get her a mobile phone if she does. 3. Her sister Susie wants to get an A too. 4. Mum will get her a new bike. 5. Mum thinks this will make them both study hard. 6. Maybe this will help them succeed. In 1. 2. 3. 4. 55 words which story do you learn: Lisas thoughts?A, _______ B& Susies thoughts? ____ CC C Mums thoughts?___ the narrator is NOT a character?______ B&C Application What is Mum doing to help the girls get an A in class? She is giving them a mobile phone or a bike if they get an A. ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ __

Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story. 177 2014 All rights reserved. ndependent Practice (continued) Remember the Concept Explain how points of view affect the story. 1 2 3 Read the stories, paying attention to the point of view. Identify the main characters thoughts in each story. (underline) Explain how points of view affect the story. (answer questions) Main character: Mick A. 1st Person: 1. Now, Ive got the ball. 2. Ill dribble it down the side. 3. Then Ill arch a kick over the goalies head into the corner of the net. 4. That will put our team ahead. 32 words B. 3rd Person Limited: 1. Mick takes a pass and dribbles down the side. 2. He wants to kick the ball over the goalies head into the corner of the net. 3. His team takes the lead. 30 words Point of view (POV) is the perspective from which the story is told. A first-person narrator gives his or her own POV as a character in the story. A third-person limited narrator tells about the POV of one character. A third-person omniscient narrator tells about the POV of all characters. POV What the reader knows First-Person Narrator I Reader knows only one characters thoughts as told by that character. Third-Person Limited Narrator he, she Reader knows one characters thoughts as told by a narrator, and sometimes know the narrators opinion. ThirdPerson Omniscient

Narrator He, she Reader knows all characters thoughts and the narrators opinions. C. 3rd Person Omniscient: 1. Mick gets the ball and dribbles down the side. 2. He wants to arch a kick over the goalies head. 3. Sam the goalie sees him coming and puts his hands up. 4. He is trying to block the shot. 5. But Mick scores and his team now leads. 45 words In 1. 2. 3. which story do you learn: Micks thoughts?A, _______ B& Sams thoughts?CC ____ B& the narrator is NOT a character?______ C Application Why does Mick want to arch his kick? He wants to get it over the goalies head. ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ __ Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story. 178 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Main character: Mary Poppins A. 1st Person: 1. These kids are just not cleaning up their room. 2. I will show them how we do it. 3. Ill click my fingers and everything will get done for us. 4. Its all about knowing how to do it. 36 words B. 3rd Person Omniscient: 1. The children are feeling lazy and dont want to clean their room. 2. Mary decides to show them how to do it her way. 3. She clicks her fingers and it all gets done. 4. Its obvious she knows how to do it. 5. Wouldnt you agree? 43 words In 1. 2. 3. which story do you learn: A&B Marys thoughts? _______ the narrator is NOT a character?______

B the childrens thoughts?B____ Point of view (POV) is the perspective from which the story is told. A first-person narrator gives his or her own POV as a character in the story. A third-person limited narrator tells about the POV of one character. A third-person omniscient narrator tells about the POV of all characters. Extended Thinking Read this story and explain how points of view affect it. (answer question) 3rd Person Omniscient: 1. Pete the Penguin wanted to fly, but his wings were only flippers used for swimming. 2. A wise polar bear wanted to help Pete. 3. So he told him about the Blue Land. 4. There, Pete could jump so high it would feel like flying. 5. Pete and the bear became friends. 48 words How would this story be different with a first person narrator? A You would know Petes thoughts and the polar bears thoughts. B You would know Petes thoughts and the narrators thoughts. C You would know only Petes thoughts. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story. 179 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Main character: Rikki-tikki-tavi A. 1st Person: 1. I am the great snake catcher. 2. No fear here. 3. I will chase him, grab him by the tail, and slam him down. 4. This mongoose knows how to catch snakes. 29 words B. 3rd Person Limited: 1. Rikki-tikki-tavi is a mongoose known for catching snakes. 2. He has no fear. 3. He will chase the snake, grab him by the tail, and slam him down. 4. He really knows how to deal with snakes. 34 words In which story do you learn: 1. the mongooses thoughts?A_______ &B 2. the narrator is NOT a character?______ B Point of view (POV) is the perspective from which the story is told. A first-person narrator gives his or her own POV as a character in the story. A third-person limited narrator tells about the POV of one character. A third-person omniscient narrator tells about the POV of all characters.

Extended Thinking Read this story and explain how points of view affect it. (answer question) 3rd Person Limited: 1. Larry the Lizard wanted to sun himself on a big rock. 2. But a big branch fell on him. 3. He couldnt move. 4. Larry thought a crocodile would find him. 5. But then a friendly kangaroo came and lifted the branch. 6. Larry felt so happy to be free. How would this story be different with a third-person omniscient 45 words narrator? A You would know Larrys thoughts and the kangaroos thoughts and the narrators thoughts. B You would know Larrys thoughts and the narrators thoughts. C You would know only Larrys thoughts. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story. 180 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Remember the Concept Main character: Peter Pan A. 3rd Person Limited: 1. Peter flew into the nursery to visit Wendy and the boys. 2. He liked to have her tell him stories. 3. But then he taught them to fly with pixie dust and good thoughts. 4. It was great fun for the kids but trouble for their parents. 44 words B. 3rd Person Omniscient: 1. Peter wanted to hear more of Wendys stories and flew into the nursery. 2. Wendy and the boys wanted to learn to fly. 3. He taught them, using pixie dust and good thoughts. 4. Their parents thought this would lead to trouble. 5. What do you think? 43 In which story do you learn: words &B 1. Peters thoughts?A_______ 2. Wendys thoughts?______ B 3. the parents thoughtsB____ 4. the narrator is NOT a character?______ A&B Point of view (POV) is the perspective from which the story is told. A first-person narrator gives his or her own POV as a character in the story. A third-person limited narrator tells about the POV of one character. A third-person omniscient narrator tells about the POV of all characters.

Extended Thinking Read this story and explain how points of view affect it. (answer question) 1st Person: (Kikka the Koala) 1. I cant wait to eat some more leaves tonight. 2. They really taste good. 3. My friend Gerry the Giraffe eats the leaves from the tops of the trees in the daytime. 4. I get all the rest of them at night. 5. We are good at sharing that way. 46 words How would this story be different with a third-person limited narrator? A You would know Kikkas thoughts and the giraffes thoughts and the narrators thoughts. B You would know Kikkas thoughts and the narrators thoughts. Australian Curriculum English C You would know only Kikkas thoughts. Year 5 Literature 1610.2 Explain how points of view affect the story. 181 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will explain character traits. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELT 1612 Create literary texts using realistic and fantasy settings and characters that draw on the worlds represented in texts students have experienced. Embedded Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY1702 Navigate and read texts for specific purposes applying appropriate text processing strategies, for example predicting and confirming, monitoring meaning, skimming and scanning. Year 5 ACELY 1703 Use comprehension strategies to analyse information, integrating and linking ideas from a variety of print and digital sources. Prerequisite(s): Year 4 ACELT 1605 Discuss how authors and illustrators make stories exciting, moving and absorbing and hold readers interest by using various techniques, for example character development and plot tension. Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: This lesson requires lots of reading. Multiple reading strategies should be used such as prereading words, defining vocabulary words, and reading fluency. In addition, many pictures and video clips should be used. Vocabulary Academic: explain Content: character traits, appearance, behaviour, dialogue Support: properly, absolutely, location, boasted, reflection, replied, half-case, removed, tourist, tour guide, former, ambitious, confident, conscientious, considerate, dedicated, earnest, smug, somber

EDI Lesson Overview A182 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will explain1 character traits. Read the learning objective to your partner. What does explain mean? Explain means __________. Activate Prior Knowledge A character trait is the way an author describes what a character is like. An author describes characters by their actions, feelings and thoughts. 1. On the way to school, Tanya found a boy much bigger than herself who seemed to be crying. 2. Tanya softly asked, Are you hurt? 3. The boy said that he had fallen and was unable to stand up. 4. Tanya in a calm voice said, I will go to school to find help. 5. She gave the boy her water bottle and briskly walked to school. 64 words What is the character trait for Tanya? A generous (showing kindness) Make the Connection Students, you already know how to identify character traits. Today, we will continue to explain character traits. B grateful (thankful) Definitions 1 182 make clear 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development A character trait is the way an author describes what characters are like. An author describes characters by their appearance, behaviour, and dialogue. Character traits show what characters are like adaptable, ambitious, confident, conscientious, considerate, dedicated, earnest, hilarious, smug, somber Character Traits Checking for Understanding Phillip is dedicated (works very hard). Phillips Best Job Ever 1. Phillip is starting Year 5. 2. He is a skinny boy with curious, brown eyes. 3. Even though he is a serious student, he is always quick to smile.

4. Ever since Year 2, Phillip knew that science was Behaviour shows his favourite subject. 5. This is why, when his teacher a characters asked if any student was interested in helping collect actions flowers, he quickly responded, I am. 6. To collect flowers, Phillip has to wake up early. 7. It is absolutely1 necessary to gather flowers after the dew dries up but before the day starts to heat up. 8. He makes sure not to pick flowers that are bruised or have insect marks on them. 9. Phillip also has to maintain records for the location3, the date and the time the flowers are collected. 10. One day, his teacher admiringly declared, You are the best flower collector I have ever had. 11. Dialogue shows Phillip proudly responded, This is the best job I a characters have ever had. words 151 words Appearance shows a characters looks 183 Which sentence below when added to the story describes Phillip as dedicated? Which sentence when added to the story describes Phillip as not dedicated? A. Philip refused to wake up early to collect flowers. B. Phillip did not mind working long hours to collect the flowers. c. Phillip thinks that collecting flowers is exciting. Give an example of a character trait. Why is this an example of a character trait? ____ is an example of a character trait because_______. Definitions 2 3 without question place 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Appearance shows a characters looks A character trait is the way an author describes what characters are like. An author describes characters by their appearance, behaviour, and dialogue. Behaviour shows a characters actions Explain character traits. 1 2 Dialogue shows a characters words Read the question. (underline what you need to know)

Read the passage below. a Identify words that explain the character trait. (underline) Checking for Understanding Which words explain that the peacock is smug (thinks highly of itself)? How did I/you identify words that explain the character? The Peacock and The Crane 1. There was a peacock who often boasted4 about his beauty. 2. Every day he walked to the banks of a large lake and looked at his own reflection5 and said "Oh! 3. What a beautiful bird I am! Look at my colourful tail. 4. Once the peacock saw a crane on the banks of the lake. 5. He said with a sneer to the crane, "What a colourless bird you are! 6. You have no beautiful and colourful feathers like mine." 7. The crane replied, "Of course, I don't have beautiful feathers. 8. But, my feathers can help me fly across the lake. 9. Can your feathers make you fly?" 10. There was no reply6 from the peacock. 108 words Definitions bragged mirror image 6 answer 4 5 184 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) A character trait is the way an author describes what characters are like. An author describes characters by their appearance, behaviour, and dialogue. Explain character traits. 1 2 Appearance shows a characters looks Behaviour shows a characters actions Dialogue shows a characters words Read the question. (underline what you need to know) Read the passage below. a Identify words that explain the character trait. (underline) Checking for Understanding Which words explain that the crane is confident (selfassured)? How did I/you identify words that explain the character? The Peacock and The Crane 1. There was a peacock who often boasted about his beauty. 2. Every day he walked to the banks of a large lake and looked at his own reflection and said "Oh! 3. What a beautiful bird I am! Look at my colourful tail. 4. Once the peacock saw a crane on the banks of the lake. 5.

He said with a sneer to the crane, "What a colourless bird you are! 6. You have no beautiful and colourful feathers like mine." 7. The crane replied, "Of course, I don't have beautiful feathers. 8. But, my feathers can help me fly across the lake. 9. Can your feathers make you fly?" 10. There was no reply from the peacock. 108 words 185 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Checking for Understanding Explain character traits. 1 2 1 Read the question. (underline what you need to know) Read the passage below. a Identify words that explain the character trait. (underline) How did I/you determine the purpose for reading? 2 How did I/you locate information that matches the purpose? 3 How did I/you ensure my/your response matched the purpose? Underline the sentences that describe why Harrisons grandfathers character trait is sad? Harrisons Grandfather 1. As far as Harrison can remember, his grandfathers eyes and the songs that he softly sang were always full of sorrow. 2. Harrison wanted to know why he had never seen his grandfather smile. 3. One day he shyly asked, Grandfather, why are you always so sad? 4. His grandfather in a quiet voice replied, When I was a young boy about your age, a tsunami7 hit our town. 5. The grandfather continued to tell Harrison how he lost his mum and dad and many friends. 6. In a tearful voice his grandfather explained, Even now, I can still hear the roar of that huge wave as it hit the shore. 7. Then, his grandfather told Harrison, I never got to say goodbye to my parents and friends. 8. Harrison lovingly touched his grandfathers tired hands. 9. Harrison cried the day he learned why his grandfather lost his smile. 141 words Cultural TheConnection big Indian Ocean tsunami occurred on December 26, 2004. More than 230,000 people died, mostly in Indonesia, India and Thailand. Minor flooding occurred in Australia. Do you know anyone who had family affected by that tsnuami? 186 Application Write two sentences that use the grandfathers behaviour to show that his character trait is sad. 1: Harrisons grandfather sat for many hours __________________________ without saying a word. ____________________________ ____________________________ Harrisons grandfather 2: never sang happy songs.

__________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ Definitions 7 (tsunami) very large wave caused by an underwater earthquake or volcanic eruption 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance A character trait is the way an author describes what characters are like. An author describes characters by their appearance, behaviour, and dialogue. 1 Explaining character traits will help you enjoy movies and stories more. Bindis Busy Days 1. Everyone who met Bindi knew she was going to be very successful. 2. School was supposed to start at 8.25 a.m., but Bindi arrived at 8.00 a.m. sharp. 3. When the teacher said, All of you need to read at least ten pages, Bindi would read 25 pages. 2 Explaining character traits will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to explain character traits? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to explain character traits? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? 187 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Explain character traits. 1 2 Read the question. (underline what you need to know) Read the passage below. a Identify words that explain the character trait. (underline) Which words explain that Bindi is ambitious (wanting to succeed)? Bindis Busy Days 1. Everyone who met Bindi knew she was going to do well. 2. School was supposed to start at 8.25 a.m., but Bindi arrived early because she never wanted to be late. 3. When the teacher assigned 10 pages to read, Bindi would read 20 pages because she wanted to learn more. 4. When the teacher assigned 10 maths problems, Bindi did 15 because she wanted to make sure she understood. 5. At the end of the year, Bindi was the best student in her class. Application Which sentence(s) would show that Bindi is not ambitious (not wanting to suceed)? A We have to read ten pages! Thats way too much, Bindi complained. B Bindi was never seen resting. She was either reading, writing or drawing.

C Bindi thought to herself, Why do I have to do all the work. My sisters should! A character trait is the way an author describes what characters are like. An author describes characters by their appearance, behaviour, and dialogue. Appearance shows a characters looks Behaviour shows a characters actions Dialogue shows a characters words Dialogue tag clue words: said, whispered, replied, quietly said Dialogue tag before Dylan said, We will go home after school. Dialogue tag after We will go home after school, said Dylan. Extended Thinking Change two sentences from the passage that explain Bindis behaviour through dialogue. Dialog tag before: _____________________________________________________________________ Bindi replied, Teacher, I want to read more because I want to learn. Dialog tag after: _______________________________________________________________________ I do not ever want to be late to school, Bindi thought. Summary Closure What did you learn today about explaining character traits? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. 188 Word Bank character traits appearance behaviour dialogue 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Explain character traits. 1 2 Read the question. (underline what you need to know) Read the passage below. a

Identify words that explain the character trait. (underline) Which words explain that Audreys character trait is earnest (serious about something)? A character trait is the way an author describes what characters are like. An author describes characters by their appearance, behaviour, and dialogue. Appearance shows a characters looks Audreys Book 1. Audrey is a very active girl. 2. She likes to ride her bicycle, climb trees and play hide-and-seek. 3. One rainy day, her mother gave her a book to read. 4. Audrey murmured9 under her breath, Id rather be outside playing with my friends. 5. Not really excited, Audrey opened the book and started to read about the rock wallabies. 6. She read how these beautiful acrobats10 are slowly disappearing11. 7. The next day was perfect for play but Audrey declared, Mum, today I will read some more. 8. She learnt how the rock wallabies are having to compete with the rabbits for food. 9. Another day went by, and Audrey could not stop reading. 10. She found out how the rock wallabies are being eaten by hungry cats. 11. One Monday, her best friend invited her to go bicycle riding. 12. Audrey gave her the book and told her, You have to read this book. 13. Her friend replied, Id rather be outside playing with my friends. 14. The next day, her friend said, I will not play today. 15. I want to read more about the rock wallabies. 16. This is how Audrey and her friend decided to try to help save the rock wallabies. 192 words Behaviour shows a characters actions Dialogue shows a characters words Application Why does the author describe Audrey as being active at the beginning? A To show how the book changes her life. Definitions B To show all the things that young girls like to do. 9 C To show why her clothes are always dirty. 11 10 189 whispered one who jumps and moves skillfully going away 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Which words explain that Audreys best friends character trait is earnest (serious about something)? Audreys Book

1. Audrey is a very active girl. 2. She likes to ride her bicycle, climb trees and play hide-and-seek. 3. One rainy day, her mother gave her a book to read. 4. Audrey murmured9 under her breath, Id rather be outside playing with my friends. 5. Not really excited, Audrey opened the book and started to read about the rock wallabies. 6. She read how these beautiful acrobats10 are slowly disappearing11. 7. The next day was perfect for play but Audrey declared, Mum, today I will read some more. 8. She learnt how the rock wallabies are having to compete with the rabbits for food. 9. Another day went by, and Audrey could not stop reading. 10. She found out how the rock wallabies are being eaten by hungry cats. 11. One Monday, her best friend invited her to go bicycle riding. 12. Audrey gave her the book and told her, You have to read this book. 13. Her friend replied, Id rather be outside playing with my friends. 14. The next day, her friend said, I will not play today. 15. I want to read more about the rock wallabies. 16. This is how Audrey and her friend decided to try to help save the rock wallabies. 192 words Extended Thinking Choose the sentences that show the appearance of Audrey and her friend. A character trait is the way an author describes what characters are like. An author describes characters by their appearance, behaviour, and dialogue. Appearance shows a characters looks Behaviour shows a characters actions Dialogue shows a characters words Describing the appearance of a character Colour of eyes, hair, skin Height Clothing they wear Body shape A. Audrey is a pretty girl of slight build and always ready to smile. B. Her best friend begged, Come on Audrey. We will have a great day today. C. Audreys best friend has a rounded face with slightly raised cheeks. D. Audrey and her best friend attend the same school and live right next to each other. 190 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept What character trait do you think best describes Ekavir? Underline any sentences that show his character trait. Ekavirs Life as a Street Kid 1. Its noisy, smoky, smelly and crowded. 2. It is not a part of India that most tourists1 want to visit. 3. But every morning, Ekavir, a young Indian tour guide2, takes visitors for a tour that they will never forget. 4. The tourists will learn about the street kids. 5. These are Indias homeless children who do not have parents to care for them. 6. Ekavir is a former3 street kid himself. 7. His mother died when he was only five. 8. Ekavir begins his story by pointing to boys who are emptying filthy bottles and cans to sell. 9. He sighs and says, I used to sell those myself. 10. I always woke up

early to gather the best ones. 11. Then Ekavir explains, I put together enough money from selling rubbish to buy myself a little shoe shine box. 12. He points to the shoe-shining boys. 13. A tourist, exclaims, Oh, such a sad story. 14. Ekavir then says, Once I had enough money saved, I bought myself nice clothes to work in a restaurant. 15. Ekavir, with a grin, finishes his story, And today, I am here with all of you. 16. The tourists started to A. considerate (thoughtful) B. ambitious (wanting to clap and had dampness in their eyes. 192 words succeed) C. courteous (polite) D. grateful (thankful) A character trait is the way an author describes what characters are like. An author describes characters by their appearance, behaviour, and dialogue. Appearance shows a characters looks Behaviour shows a characters actions Dialogue shows a characters words World Connection More than 300.000 street kids are believed to live on the streets of New Delhi, India. Why do you think Ekavir has a big grin when he finishes his story. Extended Thinking Application Write two sentences that show Ekavirs appearance before and after he starts working at the restaurant. Ekavirs clothes were always dirty and too big for him. Before: _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Ekavirs clothes were always nicely pressed and fit his body just right. Definitions 1 2 3 visitors (tour guide) someone who shows visitors around used to be After: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ 191 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3

Remember the Concept What character trait do you think best describes the tourists 1? Underline any sentences that show his character trait. Ekavirs Life as a Street Kid 1. Its noisy, smoky, smelly and crowded. 2. It is not a part of India that most tourists want to visit. 3. But every morning, Ekavir, a young Indian tour guide2, takes visitors for a tour that they will never forget. 4. The tourists will learn about the street kids. 5. These are Indias homeless children who do not have parents to care for them. 6. Ekavir is a former3 street kid himself. 7. His mother died when he was only five. 8. Ekavir begins his story by pointing to boys who are emptying filthy bottles and cans to sell. 9. He sighs and says, I used to sell those myself. 10. I always woke up early to gather the best ones. 11. Then Ekavir explains, I put together enough money from selling trash to buy myself a little shoe shine box. 12. He points to the shoe-shining boys. 13. A tourist, exclaims, Oh, such a sad story. 14. Ekavir then says, Once I had enough money saved, I bought myself nice clothes to work in a restaurant. 15. Ekavir, with a grin, finishes his story, And today, I am here with all of you. 16. The tourists started to clap and had dampness in their eyes. A. considerate (thoughtful) B. ambitious (wanting to 192 words A character trait is the way an author describes what characters are like. An author describes characters by their appearance, behaviour, and dialogue. Appearance shows a characters looks Behaviour shows a characters actions Dialogue shows a characters words succeed) C. courteous (polite) Extended Thinking D. grateful (thankful) Application Write two sentences that show that Ekavir is ambitious. Ekavir exclaims, I did not buy any toys. I was saving myBefore: _________________________________________________________________________________________________ money to buy a shoe-shine box. Definitions 1 _________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2 After: 3 There were times I woke up so early to gather cans that I was not able to see anything, Ekavir explains. visitors (tour guide) someone who shows visitors around used to be

___________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ 192 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will plan a narrative. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELY 1704 Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive print and multimodal texts, choosing text structures, language features, images and sound appropriate to purpose and audience. Year 5 ACELT 1612 Create literary texts using realistic and fantasy settings and characters that draw on the worlds represented in texts students have experienced. Embedded Content Descriptor: Prerequisite(s): Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: Year 4 ACELY 1694 Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts containing key information and supporting details for a widening range of audiences, demonstrating increasing control over text structures and language features. Graphic organiser copies This lesson should be immediately followed by the lesson on writing and editing narratives. Students will plan the narrative in this lesson and then write and edit in the subsequent lesson. Independent practice and periodic reviews will be done after both lessons have been taught. Independent practice and periodic reviews should be done as plan, write and edit sequences so students are starting and completing an entire narrative before moving on to the next practice. Teacher should model adding details to the graphic organiser, alternating with asking students for ideas and suggestions, in the skill development exercises. Students will need additional blank graphic organiser copies for periodic reviews. Vocabulary Academic: Content: describe EDI Lesson Overview narrative, character, setting Support: A193 A182 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will plan a narrative. Read the learning objective to your partner. Activate Prior Knowledge A narrative is a story. Tell your partner about your favourite story. It can be a story from a book, a movie or a television show. Who was the story about? What happened in the story? How did the story end?

Make the Connection Students, you already know what a story is. Now, we will learn how to plan a narrative. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. 193 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. A narrative must have: a title that creates interest in the story a beginning that introduces the story a middle that tells what happens in the story an ending that tells how the story ends Title Checking for Understanding Which is an example of characters? Which is an example of setting? Which is an example of an event? B A C A a cave in a cliff near the ocean B two sisters who love to swim C getting lost in a cave Introduces us to the story Characters Beginnin g Middle (who the story is about) Cinderella poor lives with e vil stepmothe r Setti ng (w he r e a n d wh e n t he s t o r y t a ke s place) Where Ci nderell as house When night of the royal ball Tells us what happens in the story Second Event Third Event First Event (characters try to solve the (characters try to solve the (a problem or situation)

Cinderella wants to go to the ball but doesnt have a dress problem) problem) Fairy Godmother gives Cinderella has to leave Cinderella a dress and at midnight, loses her glass slippers glass slipper Tells us how the story ends Solution Ending ( ho w t he problem is solved) Prince finds Cinderella by using the glass slipper R esol uti on ( w ha t t he c ha r a ct e r s d o n e xt ) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. Cinderella and the prince live happily ever after 194 Literary Connection connection Good writers do a lot of planning before they begin to write. Making a good plan with lots of detail will make the writing process easier. 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. A narrative must have: a beginning that introduces the story Plan the beginning of a narrative. 1 2 Name and describe1 the characters. (write) a Include at least three details about each character. Describe the setting. (write) a Tell where the story takes place. Add details. b Tell when the story takes place. Add details. Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you describe the characters? 2 How did I/you describe the setting?

Plan a narrative about two brothers who find a Introduces us to the story strange key. Setting Characters (who the story is about) Jake Beginnin g little brother curious gets into trouble ( wh e r e a nd w he n t h e s t o r y t a ke s place) old shed Adam big brother smart and thinks about how to solve a problem looks out for Jake hot Where Literary Connection Good writers create characters who have good and bad traits. Often the bad traits are what cause the characters to have problems, but the good traits are what helps them solve their problems. dusty full of old boxes and things When summer afternoon Definitions 1 Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. 195 tell about 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. A narrative must have: a middle that tells what happens in the story Plan the middle of a narrative.

1 2 Describe the problem the characters face. (write) Explain how the characters try to solve the problem. (write) a Describe at least two ways the characters try to solve the problem. Plan a narrative about two brothers who find a strange key. Tells us what happens in the story Middle Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you describe the problem that the characters face? 2 How did I/you explain how the characters try to solve the problem? First Event Second Event Third Event (a problem or situation) (characters try to solve the problem) (characters try to solve the problem) Literary Connection Good writers make their stories interesting by having their characters try different ways to solve their problem. Sometimes they have to try two or more different things before they solve the problem. finds a strange key Jake opens the door Adam is worried finds a hidden door goes through the door he wants to get Jake back cant get back doesnt want to get trapped too Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. 196

2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. A narrative must have: an ending that tells how the story ends Plan the middle of a narrative. 1 2 Describe how the characters solve the problem. (write) Describe what the characters do after the problem is solved. (write) Plan a narrative about two brothers who find a strange key. Tells us how the story ends Solution ( ho w t he problem is solved) Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you describe the how the characters solved the problem? 2 How did I/you describe what the characters do after the problem is solved? Literary Connection Good writers end the story by letting Adam ties a rope around his waist and goes through the door to save Jake you know what happens to the characters and what was important in the story. Ending R esol uti on ( w ha t t he c ha r a ct e r s d o n e xt ) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. Jake promises not to go near the door alone again go home for dinner keep the door and the key secret = maybe go back and explore 197 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. A narrative must have: a title that creates interest in the story a beginning that introduces the story a middle that tells what happens in the story an ending that tells how the story ends 1 Planning a narrative will help you organise your

ideas to write different stories. You might become an author or screenwriter, and write books or movies for everyone to enjoy. 2 Planning a narrative will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to plan a narrative? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to plan a narrative? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. 198 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Add a title to your narrative. 1 2 3 Read your narrative plan. Identify what is the most interesting and important part of your narrative. Add a title for your narrative that tells the reader what is important in the story. 1. The most important part of my narrative is: Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. (answers will vary) ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 2. My title is: A title is not a complete sentence. ___________________________________________________________________ Extended Thinking Ashley is planning a narrative. Her characters are two sisters, Ruby and Alice, who live in a cottage in the forest. One winter night a huge bear comes to their door. The bear wants to come and get warm by the fire. The girls are afraid, but they let the bear in and he sleeps by the fire until spring. Ashely needs to add: 1. A setting. 2. A problem. 3. An ending Summary Closure What did you learn today about planning a narrative? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative.

199 Literary Connection Good writers add titles that tell the readers just enough about the story to make them interested and want to read the narrative. Word Bank narrative character setting problem beginning middle ending 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Remember the Concept Plan the beginning of a narrative. 1 2 3 Plan a Plan a Plan Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. the beginning of the narrative. Include details about the characters and setting. the middle of the narrative. Include a problem and at least two more events. the ending of the story Title: (answers will Introduces us to the storyvary) Setti ng Characters (who the story is about) Beginnin g (w he r e a n d wh e n t he s t o r y t a ke s place) Where Plan a narrative about someone who can talk to animals. When Tells us what happens in the story First Event Second Event Third Event (a problem or situation)

(characters try to solve the problem) (characters try to solve the problem) Middle Tells us how the story ends Solution Ending ( ho w t he problem is solved) R esol uti on ( w ha t t he c ha r a ct e r s d o n e xt ) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. 200 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Remember the Concept Plan the beginning of a narrative. 1 2 3 Plan a Plan a Plan Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. the beginning of the narrative. Include details about the characters and setting. the middle of the narrative. Include a problem and at least two more events. the ending of the story Title: (answers will vary) Introduces us to the story Setti ng Characters (who the story is about) Beginnin g (w he r e a n d wh e n t he s t o r y t a ke s place) Where Plan a narrative about someone who

finds a mysterious box. When Tells us what happens in the story First Event Second Event Third Event (a problem or situation) (characters try to solve the problem) (characters try to solve the problem) Middle Tells us how the story ends Solution Ending ( ho w t he problem is solved) R esol uti on ( w ha t t he c ha r a ct e r s d o n e xt ) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. 201 2014 All rights reserved. Extended Thinking Remember the Concept Sarah is planning the beginning of a narrative about two children who get lost in the bush. Help her add details about her characters. Explain why you added those details. Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. Introduces us to the story Setti ng Characters (who the story is about) George Beginnin g Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. ( wh e r e a nd w he n t he s t o r y t a ke s place) Maria (answers will

vary) Where Bushland of NSW When July 202 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Remember the Concept Plan the beginning of a narrative. 1 2 3 Plan a Plan a Plan Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. the beginning of the narrative. Include details about the characters and setting. the middle of the narrative. Include a problem and at least two more events. the ending of the story Title: (answers will vary) Introduces us to the story Setti ng Characters (who the story is about) Beginnin g (w he r e a n d wh e n t he s t o r y t a ke s place) Where Plan a narrative about someone who gets lost and has to find a way home. When Tells us what happens in the story First Event Second Event Third Event (a problem or situation) (characters try to solve the problem) (characters try to solve the

problem) Middle Tells us how the story ends Solution Ending ( ho w t he problem is solved) R esol uti on ( w ha t t he c ha r a ct e r s d o n e xt ) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. 203 2014 All rights reserved. Extended Thinking Remember the Concept Ethan is planning the middle of a narrative about Bleex, an alien who has crash landed in the Western Australian outback. Help him with his plan by explaining two ways Bleex could try to solve the problem of the crashed spaceship. Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. Tells us what happens in the story First Event Second Event Third Event (a problem or situation) Bleex crashes in a spaceship in the WA desert. Middle (characters try to solve the problem) (characters try to solve the problem) (answers will vary) Bleex needs to repair the spaceship to get home. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. 204 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3

Remember the Concept Plan the beginning of a narrative. 1 2 3 Plan a Plan a Plan Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. the beginning of the narrative. Include details about the characters and setting. the middle of the narrative. Include a problem an at least two more events. the ending of the story Title: (answers will vary) Introduces us to the story Setti ng Characters (who the story is about) Beginnin g (w he r e a n d wh e n t he s t o r y t a ke s place) Where Plan a narrative about someone who wakes up with a superpower. When Tells us what happens in the story First Event Second Event Third Event (a problem or situation) (characters try to solve the problem) (characters try to solve the problem) Middle Tells us how the story ends Solution Ending ( ho w t he problem is solved) R esol uti on ( w ha t t he c ha r a ct e r s d o

n e xt ) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. 205 2014 All rights reserved. Extended Thinking Remember the Concept Determine which part of a narrative each of these details belongs in. Plan your narrative using a graphic organiser. 1. A rock climber finds an enormous nest hidden on a steep cliff face. 2. Florence is nine years old and loves horses. 3. The children were rescued by the rangers and went home safe. 4. Liam lives on the edge of the Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia. 5. Madison falls asleep on a bench and wakes up to find she has been locked inside the museum. 6. Lucy finds a bottle on the beach with an old letter inside. 7. Holly and Caitlin figure out how to get out of the maze and back to the park where the class is having a picnic. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.1 Plan a narrative. 206 Beginning Middle End Some answers may vary. Students should be able to explain their answers 2014 All rights reserved. Year 5 English Learning Objective: We will write a narrative. Content Descriptor: Year 5 ACELT 1612 Create literary texts using realistic and fantasy settings and characters that draw on the worlds represented in texts students have experienced. Year 5 ACELY 1704 Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive print and multimodal texts, choosing text structures, language features, images and sound appropriate to purpose and audience. Embedded Content Descriptor: Prerequisite(s): Manipulative(s): Special Instructions: Year 4 ACELY 1694 Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts containing key information and supporting details for a widening range of audiences, demonstrating increasing control over text structures and language features. Graphic organisers from previous lesson Plan a Narrative. This lesson should follow the lesson on planning narratives. Students planned the narrative in that

lesson and then will write and edit in this lesson. Independent practice and periodic reviews will be done after both lessons have been taught. Independent practice and periodic reviews should be done as plan, write and edit sequences so students are starting and completing an entire narrative before moving on to the next practice. Teacher should model adding details to the graphic organiser, alternating with asking students for ideas and suggestions, in the skill development exercises. Students will need additional blank graphic organiser copies for periodic reviews. Vocabulary Academic: Content: Support: describe EDI Lesson Overview narrative, character, setting A207 2014 All rights reserved. Learning Objective Declare the Objective We will write a narrative. Read the learning objective to your partner. Activate Prior Knowledge Pair-Share with your partner the planning chart you made in the previous lesson. (Page 205) Title: Introduces us to the story Setti ng Characters Beginnin g (who the story is about) (w he r e a n d wh e n t he s t o r y t a ke s place) Where When First Event Tells us what happens in the story Second Event Third Event (a problem or situation) Middle (characters try to solve the problem) (characters try to solve the problem) Make the Connection Students, you already know how to plan

a narrative. Now, we will write a narrative. Tells us how the story ends Solution Ending ( ho w t he problem is solved) R esol uti on ( w ha t t he c ha r a ct e r s d o n e xt ) Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.2 Write a narrative. 207 2014 All rights reserved. Concept Development To write a narrative means to take your narrative plan and write a finished story. To write a narrative, put your story details into complete sentences. Checking for Understanding Which is a complete sentence? A Cinderella and the handsome prince. B Cinderella lost her glass slipper. Title Cinderella Beginning Introduces us to the story Setti ng Characters (who the story is about) Cindere lla poor l ive s with e vil stepmother (w he r e a n d wh e n t he s t o r y t a ke s place) Where Cinde rellas house When ni ght of the royal ball Tells us what happens in the story Middle First Event Second Event

Third Event (a problem or situation) (characters try to solve the problem) (characters try to solve the problem) Cinderella wants to go to the ball but doesnt have a dress Fairy Godmother gives Cinderella a dress and glass slippers Cinderella has to leave at midnight, loses her glass slipper Tells us how the story ends Ending Sol uti on (h o w t he problem is solved) R esol uti on (w h a t t h e ch a r a c t e r s d o ne x t ) Prince finds Cinderella by using the glass slipper Cinderella and the prince live happily ever after Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.2 Write a narrative. 208 Cinderella was very sad because she had no pretty clothes and she had to work all of the time to take care of her evil stepmother and stepsisters. She knew there was a wonderful Royal Ball that very night, and she wished she could go and see the Royal family and dance with the prince. Suddenly there was a bright flash of light and a sparkly Fairy Godmother appeared. She told Cinderella she would give her a beautiful gown and glass slippers so that she could go to the ball. Cinderella was very happy, but then the Fairy Godmother told her she must leave the ball before the last stroke of midnight or her beautiful dress would turn to rags. Cinderella went to the ball in her gown and glass slippers. She danced with the prince and he fell in love with her. She was having so much fun she forgot about the time until she heard the clock start to strike the midnight hour. She ran down the steps of the palace and away so quickly she lost one of her glass slippers. The prince tried to follow Cinderella, but all he

could find was the one glass slipper on the steps. He had all of his soldiers hunt through the countryside for the girl who had lost the slipper. Finally, he found Cinderella. They were married and lived happily ever after. 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice To write a narrative means to take your narrative plan and write a finished story. To write a narrative, put your story details into complete sentences. Write the beginning of a narrative. 1 Write a paragraph for the beginning of the narrative. a Be sure to add details and descriptive language. Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you write a paragraph for the beginning? Introduces us to the story Setting Characters (who the story is about) Beginnin g Jake little brother curious gets into trouble ( wh e r e a nd w he n t h e s t o r y t a ke s place) old shed Adam big brother smart and thinks about how to solve a problem looks out for Jake hot Where dusty full of old boxes and things When Planner on page 195 summer afternoon Literary

Connection Your graphic organiser is a planning tool. Some of your original ideas may change as you begin to write. You may not use all the details that you added to the chart, or you may end up adding additional details as you write the sentences. (Answers will vary according to the plan made) Adam and Jake were cleaning out the old shed in the backyard. The shed was hot and dusty, and full of boxes and old furniture and broken things. Adam was mad because he had to clean the shed and take care of his little brother, Jake. Jake was curious about everything he saw. He kept opening up boxes and looking at what was inside. It was going to take forever to clean out the shed, but at least Jake wasnt getting into any trouble. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.2 Write a narrative. 209 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) To write a narrative means to take your narrative plan and write a finished story. To write a narrative, put your story details into complete sentences. Write the middle of a narrative. 1 Write paragraphs for the middle of the narrative. a Be sure to add details and descriptive language. Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you write paragraphs for the middle of the narrative? Tells us what happens in the story First Event Second Event Third Event (a problem or situation) Middle finds a strange key finds a hidden door (characters try to solve the problem) Jake opens the door goes through the door cant get back (characters try to solve the problem) Adam is worried he wants to get Jake back doesnt want to get trapped too

Planner on page 196 Suddenly Jake yelled, Look what I found! He was holding up a huge key. It was old and rusty and very strange. Adam had never seen a key like that. He couldnt imagine what door or lock it opened. Then he heard Jake gasp. Look behind you! Jake said. Adam turned around and saw a door in the back wall of the shed. That was weird. There had never been a door there before. Before Adam could say anything, Jake ran to the door and used the key to open it. He stuck his head in the opening, and he was suddenly gone as if he had been sucked through the open door. Adam ran over to the door and looked through. He expected to see their backyard, but there was nothing but blackness on the other side of the door. He could not see Jake anywhere. It felt like a strong wind was pushing him toward the open door or as if something on the other side was pulling him in. Adam held tight to the door. He backed away from the door. He knew he needed to get Jake back, but he didnt know how. His little brother was annoying sometimes, but he couldnt leave him stuck on the other side of that door forever. Besides, Mum would kill him if he lost Jake. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.2 Write a narrative. 210 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) To write a narrative means to take your narrative plan and write a finished story. To write a narrative, put your story details into complete sentences. Write the ending of a narrative. 1 Write one or two paragraphs for the ending of the narrative. a Be sure to add details and descriptive language. Checking for Understanding 1 How did I/you write paragraphs for the ending of the narrative? Tells us how the story ends Solution Ending ( ho w t he problem is solved) R esol uti on ( w ha t t he c ha r a ct e r s d o n e xt ) Adam ties a rope around his waist and goes through the door to save Jake Jake promises not to go near the door alone again go home for dinner keep the door and the key secret = maybe go back and explore Planner on page 197 Adam looked around the shed. He needed something to help him rescue Jake. He saw a coil of rope hanging on the wall. Quickly he grabbed the rope and tied it around his waist. He tied the other end to a big table. He inched over to the door and tried to go through slowly. The wind pulled him through. It was black and he couldnt see anything. He reached his arms out and felt around. He felt his hand hit someone. It was Jake. He grabbed Jake and held him as he used the rope to pull

them both back to the door. When they were both safe in the shed, Adam let go of Jake and slammed the door shut. Then they heard their mum calling them to dinner. Adam looked at the door. He took the key out of the lock and the door vanished again. Are you going to tell Mum and Dad about the door? Jake asked. Mum will be mad if you tell her I got lost in there. No, said Adam, Maybe we can keep it a secret, but you have to promise never to go there alone, Jake nodded. But maybe someday we can go back, together. Maybe, Adam said. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.2 Write a narrative. 211 2014 All rights reserved. kill Development & Guided Practice (continued) To write a narrative means to take your narrative plan and write a finished story. Editing your narrative makes it easier for someone to read and understand your writing. Edit your narrative. 1 2 Checking for Understanding Use the editing checklist to identify and correct errors in your narrative. Rewrite your narrative on a separate page. 1 How did I/you edit my/your narrative? Year 5 Editing Standards Capitalisati on Titles The pronoun I Proper nouns (names of people and places) Beginning of a sentence Punctuatio n End of sentence (. ? !) Quotation marks Apostrophes Contractions ^ Spelling Silent beginning sounds Words with E-drop (moving) Words with prefixes Regular and irregular nouns Double consonants High-frequency words Verbs & Pronouns Simple verb tense Subject-verb agreement Pronouns (singular) Sentence Types

Compound sentences Complex sentences Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.2 Write a narrative. 212 2014 All rights reserved. Relevance To write a narrative means to take your narrative plan and write a finished story. To write a narrative, put your story details into complete sentences. 1 Writing a narrative will help you organise your ideas to write different stories. You could publish your stories in a book or on the Internet. 2 Writing a narrative will help you do well on tests. Checking for Understanding Does anyone else have another reason why it is relevant to write a narrative? (Pair-Share) Why is it relevant to write a narrative? You may give one of my reasons or one of your own. Which reason is more relevant to you? Why? Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.2 Write a narrative. 213 2014 All rights reserved. Skill Closure Remember the Concept Edit your partners narrative. 1 Exchange narratives with your partner. 2 Read and edit your partners narrative. 3 Explain to your partner what you liked about his/her narrative and what errors you found To write a narrative means to take your narrative plan and write a finished story. To write a narrative, put your story details into complete sentences. Extended Thinking Mitchell is writing a narrative. One of his characters is Alexander. Which sentence should he use to describe the character? Explain your answer. 1. Alexander was a boy. 2. Alexander liked football. 3. Every day, rain or shine, Alexander practised football after school, hoping to become the best player on the team. Mitchell should use sentence 3 because it has the most detail and descriptive language.

Summary Closure What did you learn today about writing a narrative? (Pair-Share) Use words from the word bank. Australian Curriculum English Year 5 Literacy 1704.2 Write a narrative. 214 Word Bank narrative character setting problem beginning middle ending 2014 All rights reserved. Independent Practice Write a narrative. 1 2 Write your narrative using the chart you created in planning a narrative. a Write a paragraph for the beginning of a narrative. b Write two or three paragraphs for the middle of the narrative. c Write a paragraph or two for the ending of the narrative. Use the editing checklist to edit your narrative. Write a narrative about someone who can talk to animals. Planner on page 200 Extended Thinking Pair-Share with your partner about what errors you will check for when editing your narrative. Application Write a sentence identifying one of the errors you will be checking for when editing your text. I will look for errors in capitalizing proper nouns. T: _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Answers will vary. S: Australian Curriculum English Year 5 _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Literacy 1704.2 215-217 Write a narrative. 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 1 Write a narrative. 1 2

Write your narrative using the chart you created in planning a narrative. a Write a paragraph for the beginning of a narrative. b Write two or three paragraphs for the middle of the narrative. c Write a paragraph or two for the ending of the narrative. Use the editing checklist to edit your narrative. Write a narrative about someone who finds a mysterious box. Planner on page 201 Extended Thinking Sarah is writing a narrative. She has some ideas about her character, and needs to write compete sentences to introduce him. 1st Character: Nicholas 12 years old likes astronomy plays video games Application Write a sentence using some of the details to describe Nicholas. T: Nicholas loved being outside at night, so he could watch the stars _______________________________________________________________________________________________ and planets move across the sky. _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Answers will vary. S: Australian Curriculum English Note: Students have a blank page on page 218 to Year 5 _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Literacy 1704.2 allow pages 219 and 220 to be facing pages. 219-221 Write a narrative. 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 2 Write a narrative. 1 2 Write your narrative using the chart you created in planning a narrative. a Write a paragraph for the beginning of a narrative. b Write two or three paragraphs for the middle of the narrative. c Write a paragraph or two for the ending of the narrative. Use the editing checklist to edit your narrative. Write a narrative about someone who gets lost and has to find a way home. Extended Thinking Planner on page 203 James is writing a narrative. He needs to edit this passage about his character, Liam. James wants to rewrite the passage by combining short sentences into compound or

complex sentences. Which of the sentences below could he use? Liam liked watching movies. Liams favourite movies were science fiction. He liked movies about aliens. And Liam liked space travel movies, too. Sometimes, he watched two or three movies on the weekend. 1. Liam liked watching movies, so sometimes he watched two or three movies on the weekend. 2. Liam liked watching movies because he liked space travel movies too. 3. Liams favourite movies were science fiction, but he liked watching movies. 4. Sometimes he watched two or three movies on the weekend, and Liam liked space travel movies too. 5. Because Liams favourite movies were science fiction, he liked movies about aliens and space travel. Australian Curriculum English Note: Students have a blank page on page 222 to Year 5 Literacy 1704.2 allow pages 223 and 224 to be facing pages. Write a narrative. 223-225 2014 All rights reserved. Periodic Review 3 Write a narrative. 1 2 Write your narrative using the chart you created in planning a narrative. a Write a paragraph for the beginning of a narrative. b Write two or three paragraph for the middle of the narrative. c Write a paragraph or two for the ending of the narrative. Use the editing checklist to edit your narrative. Write a narrative about someone who wakes up with a superpower. Planner on page 205 Extended Thinking Cameron wrote a narrative about a boy who goes to a dark castle. He doesnt want to edit it. Read the beginning of his narrative and explain to Cameron why he should edit his work. Application Write a sentence explaining why Cameron should edit his work. _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Australian Curriculum English Note: Students have a blank page on page 226 to Year 5 Literacy 1704.2 allow pages 227 and 228 to be facing pages. Write a narrative. 227-229 2014 All rights reserved. Teacher Edition

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