Multiculturalism International and Cross-Cultural Communication Globalization: You are

Multiculturalism International and Cross-Cultural Communication Globalization: You are

Multiculturalism International and Cross-Cultural Communication Globalization: You are not alone People from different cultures are different in a variety of ways, including:

Different ways of greeting each other Different ways of looking at things Different ways of dressing Different ways of expressing personality/ goodness Profile your audience Base your communication on: What you know What you can research Social cues Do not ever assume that they will assume that

you are right because you are American and dont assume yourself that you are somehow right because of your culture. Some Perceptions of Americans Europe & especially England: "Americans are stupid and unsubtle. And they are fat and bad dressers. Finland: "Americans always want to say your name: 'That's a nice tie, Mikko. Hi

Mikko, how are you Mikko Indian: "Americans are always in a hurry. Just watch the way they walk down the street. Kenyan: "Americans are distant. They are not really close to other people -- even other Americans.

Turkey: "Once we were out in a rural area in the middle of nowhere and saw an American come to a stop sign. Though he could see in both directions for miles, and there was no traffic, he still stopped!" Some Perceptions of Americans Colombia: "In the United States, they think that life is only work. Indonesia: "In the United States everything has to be talked about and

analyzed. Even the littlest thing has to be 'Why, why why?'. Ethiopia: "The American is very explicit. He wants a 'yes' or 'no'. If someone tries to speak figuratively, the American is confused. Iran: "The first time my American professor told me 'I don't know, I will have to look it up', I was shocked. I asked myself 'Why is he teaching me?'" People from different cultures

have are different in a variety of ways, including: Different ways of greeting each other Different ways of looking at things Different ways of dressing Different ways of expressing personality/goodness Take the everyday handshake, for example.

In the US, a firm, short handshake indicates self-confidence. In most parts of Africa, a limp handshake is the correct way to do it. The handshake may last several minutes. Why might knowing that different cultures have different greetings be useful to you? People from different cultures have are different in a variety of ways, including:

Different ways of greeting each other Different ways of looking at things Different ways of dressing Different ways of expressing personality/goodness Different cultures have different ways of scanning a page. American or European Reader Scanning a Page

Arabic or Chinese Reader Scanning a Page From Johnson-Sheehan, R. (2006). Technical communication today, 2nd Ed., p. 59 Basic Cultural Dimensions High Context vs. Low Context Monochronic vs. Polychronic Future vs. Present vs. Past Orientation Power Distance Individualism vs. Collectivism These dimensions are in no way absoluteculture is fluid, but they give you a starting point for considering multicultural audiences. See work by Geert Hofstede.

High Context vs. Low Context Low context culture Things are fully (though concisely) spelled out Things are made explicit Considerable dependence is put on what is actually said or written. High context culture Communicators assume a great deal of commonality of knowledge and

views Less is spelled out explicitly and much more is implicit or communicated in indirect ways More responsibility is placed on the listener to keep up their knowledge base and remain plugged into informal networks. High Context vs. Low Context Low context cultures include Anglos, Germanics and Scandinavians High context cultures include Japanese, Arabs and French Implications

Interactions between high and low context peoples can be problematic Japanese can find Westerners to be offensively blunt. Westerners can find Japanese to be secretive, devious and bafflingly unforthcoming with information French can feel that Germans insult their intelligence by explaining the obvious, while Germans can feel that French managers provide no direction

Low context cultures are vulnerable to communication breakdowns when they assume more shared understanding than there really is. This is especially true in an age of diversity. Low context cultures are not known for their ability to tolerate or understand diversity, and tend to be more insular. Monochronic vs. Polychronic Monochronic cultures Like to do just one thing at a time

Value a certain orderliness and sense of there being an appropriate time and place for everything They do not value interruptions. Polychronic cultures Like to do multiple things at the same time. A manager's office in a

polychronic culture typically has an open door, a ringing phone and a meeting all going on at the same time. Modern Representation of Chronos Picture from http://www.piers-anthony.com/bearinganhourglass.html Future vs. Present vs. Past Orientation I Past-oriented societies: Concerned with traditional values and ways of doing things Conservative in

management and slow to change things that are tied to the past Include China, Britain, Japan and most Spanishspeaking Latin American countries. Future vs. Present vs. Past Orientation II Present-oriented societies include the rest of the Spanish-speaking Latin American countries. They see the past as passed and the future as uncertain. They prefer short-term benefits.

Future vs. Present vs. Past Orientation III Future-oriented societies Optimistic about the future They think they understand it and can shape it through their actions. They view management as a matter of planning, doing and controlling (as opposed to going with the flow, letting things happen). The United States and, increasingly, Brazil, are examples of

future-oriented societies. Quantity of Time In some cultures, time is seen as being a limited resource which is constantly being used up. In other cultures, time is more plentiful, if not infinite. In old agricultural societies, time was often seen as circular, renewing itself each year. In societies where time is limited, punctuality becomes a virtue.

It is insulting to waste someone's time, and the ability to do that and get away with it is an indication of superiority/status Time is money In cultures where time is plentiful, like India or Latin American, there is no problem with making people wait all day, and then tell them to come back the next day

Time-plentiful cultures tend to rely on trust to do business. Timelimited cultures don't have time to develop trust and so create other mechanisms to replace trust (such as strong rule-by-law) Power Distance The extent to which people accept differences in power and allow this to shape many aspects of life. Is the boss always right because he/she is the boss, or only

when he/she gets it right? How, and to what extent, do power-holders separate themselves from the less powerful? Implications In high power distance countries (most agrarian countries), bypassing a superior is insubordination. In low power distance countries (US, northern Europeans, Israel),

bypassing is not usually a big deal In the US, superiors and subordinates often interact socially as equals. An outsider watching a party of professors and graduate students typically cannot tell them apart. Individualism vs. Collectivism I In individualist cultures, individual uniqueness, self-determination is valued. A person is all the more admirable if they are a "self-made man" or "makes up their own mind" or show initiative or

work well independently. Collectivist cultures expect people to identify with and work well in groups which protect them in exchange for loyalty and compliance. Individualism vs. Collectivism II Paradoxically, individualist cultures tend to believe that there are universal values that should be shared by all, while collectivist cultures tend to accept that different groups have different values. Many of the Asian cultures are collectivist, while Anglo cultures tend to be individualist.

Three Basic Communication Problems Interpreting others comments and actions Predicting behavior Conflicting behavior

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