Response to Intervention and SLD Identification The IDEA

Response to Intervention and SLD Identification The IDEA

Response to Intervention and SLD Identification The IDEA Partnership wishes to acknowledge the work of Lou Danielson, Ph.D., Director, Research to Practice Division, Office of Special Education Programs; Dr. Daryl Mellard, Director, National Research Center on Learning Disabilities (NRCLD), University of Kansas; and Dr. Douglas Fuchs, Director, National Research Center on Learning Disabilities (NRCLD), Vanderbilt University. Slides displaying the National Research Center on Learning Disabilities (NRCLD) logo contain original text presented by Lou Danielson on June 21, 2006 to the members of the IDEA Partnership Focus Group and/or Daryl Mellard on April 1, 2005 to the members of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). -andWe are deeply grateful for being allowed to adapt the original presentations in order to provide additional access to all education stakeholders. July 2007 IDEA Partnership 2 Session Overview RTI Process

SLD Identification What is it? What might it look like in practice? What are the current issues/problems? What data can RTI yield that will assist in SLD determination? Resources for further consideration July 2007 IDEA Partnership 3 RTI Process What is it? July 2007

IDEA Partnership 4 RTI is the practice of providing high-quality instruction/intervention matched to student needs and using learning rate over time and level of performance to inform educational decisions July 2007 IDEA Partnership 5 What do we mean by RTI? 1. RTI has two goals: prevent academic problems and determine students with LD. 2. 2 or more tiers of increasingly intense interventions. 3. Use a problem solving model or standardized treatment protocol for intervention tiers. 4. Implementation of a differentiated curriculum with

different instructional methods. 5. Varied duration, frequency, and time of interventions, and 6. Explicit decision rules for judging learners progress. 6 Goals of RTI Prevention of academic/behavior problems Attend to skill gaps early Provide interventions/instruction early Close skill gaps to prevent failure Determination of eligibility as a student with a specific learning disability

Pattern of inadequate response to interventions may result in referral to special education Student intervention response data are considered for SLD eligibility July 2007 IDEA Partnership 7 RTI Process What might it look like in practice? July 2007 IDEA Partnership 8 What does RTI implementation look like? 1. Students receive high quality, research-based instruction by qualified staff in their general education setting.

2. General education instructors and staff assume an active role in students assessment in that curriculum. 3. School staff conduct universal screening of (a) academics and (b) behavior. 4. School staff implement specific, research-based interventions to address the students difficulties. 9 Other features of RTI 5. Continuous progress monitoring of student performance occurs (weekly or biweekly). 6. School staff use progress-monitoring data and decision rules to determine interventions effectiveness and needed modifications. 7. Systematic assessment of the fidelity or integrity with which instruction and interventions are implemented. 10 Intervention Levels Two or more tiers

Tiers include increasing levels of intensity of interventions Primary Instruction -- differentiated curriculum and instruction for all students Secondary Interventions -- Targeted interventions for students at-risk Tertiary Interventions -- Strategic/Intense interventions for students with intensive needs July 2007 IDEA Partnership 11 Continuum of School-Wide Instruction Tertiary Intervention (~5%) ~5% Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with Intensive Needs

~15% Secondary Intervention (~15%) Specialized Group Systems for Students with At Risk Performance Primary Instruction (~80%) School-/Classroom-wide Systems for All Students, Staff and Settings ~80% of Students 12 Adapted fromWhat is School-Wide PBS? Primary Instruction Expectation = 80% or more of students successful with general education curriculum and instruction Assessment = Universal screenings for academics and social/emotional growth (behaviors)

Intervention = Through differentiated instructional practices Roles and responsibilities = primarily the general education teacher July 2007 IDEA Partnership 13 Which students may have a learning gap? Low income Culturally diverse English language learners Special education

Disengaged Male or female Career and technical education Gifted education Source: National Education Association IDEA Resource Cadre presentation on Differentiated Instruction, developed in collaboration Cheshire Connecticut Public Schools and Kathleen July 2007 with Deborah E Burns, Curriculum Coordinator, 14 IDEA Partnership Whitmire, Director, School Services in Speech-Language Pathology, American Speech and Hearing Association Differentiated Instruction Meeting diverse needs of diverse student population Differentiating based on content and student strengths and needs Choosing curriculum components to differentiate

Within the core curriculum Consistent with state learning standards July 2007 IDEA Partnership 15 Differentiatin g Instruction Extension Products Pacing Grouping Learning Teaching Intro

Resources Assessment Objective CORE CURRICULUM Source: National Education Association IDEA Resource Cadre presentation on Differentiated Instruction, developed in collaboration Cheshire Connecticut Public Schools and Kathleen July 2007 with Deborah E Burns, Curriculum Coordinator, 16 IDEA Partnership Whitmire, Director, School Services in Speech-Language Pathology, American Speech and Hearing Association Secondary Intervention Expectation = 15% of students may be at risk and in need of targeted interventions Assessment = progress monitoring of student response to specific intervention

Intervention = standard protocol treatment intervention as available from the research; evidence-based intervention as available in the literature Roles and responsibilities = variety of personnel as determined at the local site July 2007 IDEA Partnership 17 Standard Treatment Protocol Approach To Responsive-to-Intervention The standard treatment is for the student to receive a validated, intense intervention The bad news is that all students receive the same intervention The good news is that the interventions are wellspecified, sequenced with clear outcomes The interventions are more likely to be delivered

with fidelity; training is consistent Increases the consistency of services; easy to check for implementation 18 What types of interventions? Standard Treatment Protocol Interventions 1. From scientific-based education research Evidence-based Interventions 2. From education research Experiential-based Interventions 3. July 2007

From best practice with like students IDEA Partnership 19 Tertiary Intervention Expectation = 5% of students may be at significant risk and in need of intense interventions Assessment = progress monitoring of student response to specific intervention Intervention = standard protocol treatment intervention as available from the research; evidence-based intervention as available in the literature; unique intervention based on teacher expertise Roles and responsibilities = variety of personnel as determined at the local site

July 2007 IDEA Partnership 20 Problem-Solving Method What is the problem? Why is it happening? Did it work? What should be done about it? July 2007 IDEA Partnership 21 Determining interventions Use of problem-solving methodology

Define problem Brainstorm solutions Choose intervention with greatest potential for student success July 2007 Standard treatment protocol intervention Evidence-based intervention Monitor and assess intervention outcomes IDEA Partnership 22 Explicit decision rules Necessary for determining expected response or inadequate response to intervention

Considering Expected level of achievement of peer group Target for this student Movement toward the target Trajectory of improvement, or lack thereof July 2007 IDEA Partnership 23 Program/Process Evaluation Systematic and ongoing Assess integrity/fidelity of implementation of interventions Assess integrity of implementation of overall process

High quality, research-based instruction Screening and progress monitoring Data analysis Problem-solving Data-driven decision-making July 2007 IDEA Partnership 24 Advantages of RTI Approach Provides instructional assistance in a timely fashion (e.g., NOT a wait-to-fail model) Helps ensure a students poor academic performance is not due to poor instruction or inappropriate curriculum Informs teacher and improves instruction because assessment data are collected and closely linked to interventions

25 SLD Identification What are the current issues/concerns? July 2007 IDEA Partnership 26 Identification of SLD Current wait to fail model Misidentification Disproportionality July 2007 IDEA Partnership 27 Researcher Roundtable on Specific Learning Disabilities

SLD is a valid concept with converging evidence across indicators and methodologies SLD are disorders of learning and cognition intrinsic to the individual(s) Each disorder significantly affects a relatively narrow range of academic and performance outcomes SLD may occur in combination with other disabling conditions, but are not due primarily to other conditions Adapted from opening remarks by Lou Danielson, Ph.D., Director, Research to Practice Division, Office of Special Education on SLD Determination, Kansas City, MO, April 19-21, 2006 July 2007 Programs to the National SEA Conference IDEA Partnership 28

Researcher Roundtable on Response to Intervention There should be alternate ways to identify SLD Response to quality intervention is the most promising method of alternate identification Can promote effective practices in schools Can help to close the gap between identification and treatment RTI should be based on problem solving models that use progress monitoring to gauge the intensity of intervention in relation to the students response to intervention Adapted from opening remarks by Lou Danielson, Ph.D., Director, Research to Practice Division, Office of Special Education on SLD Determination, Kansas City, MO, April 19-21, 2006 July 2007 Programs to the National SEA Conference IDEA

Partnership 29 SLD Determination and IDEA 2004 (P.L. 108New language in the law: 446) a local education agency may use a process that determines if the child responds to scientific, research-based intervention as a part of the evaluation procedures Sec. 614(b)6B [emphasis added] In the special education research literature, the process mentioned in this language is generally considered as referring to RTI. From opening remarks by Lou Danielson, Ph.D., Director, Research to Practice Division, Office of Special Education Programs Determination, Kansas City, MO, April 19-21, 2006 July 2007 to the National SEA Conference on SLD IDEA 30 Partnership RTI as part of SLD Identification What data can RTI yield

that will assist in SLD determination? July 2007 IDEA Partnership 31 Explicit decision rules Necessary for determining expected response or inadequate response to intervention Considering Expected level of achievement of peer group Target for this student Movement toward the target Trajectory of improvement, or lack thereof July 2007

IDEA Partnership 32 Classroom teacher screening for a specific indicator Subtract Positive and Negative Integers Ashley 120 Charles Chelsea 100 # correct in 2 minutes Debbie Doug 80 Fred Gary 60 Jamel Juan

40 Kia Paul 20 Rosa Shirley 0 Tanisha 1 Baseline 2 3 4 5 Tonya Source: Sharon R Schultz, from a presentation/facilitated dialogue entitled RTI: Schoolwide Transformation (Spring 2007)

Progress Monitoring for a specific intervention Subtract Positive and Negative Integers 80 # correct in 2 minutes 70 60 50 Kia 40 class ave 30 20 10 0 1 Baseline 2 3 4 Gened instruction 5

6 7 8 9 Targeted Intervention Initiated Source: Sharon R Schultz, from a presentation/facilitated dialogue entitled RTI: Schoolwide Transformation (Spring 2007) Progress Monitoring for a specific intervention Kia Subtract Positive and Negative Integers class ave # co rrect in 2 min u tes 100 AIMLINE 90 80 70 60

50 40 30 Kias TRENDLINE 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 Baseline Gened instruction 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Targeted Intervention Initiated Successful Intervention !! Source: Sharon R Schultz, from a presentation/facilitated dialogue entitled RTI: Schoolwide Transformation (Spring 2007) Progress Monitoring for a specific intervention Kia Subtracting Positive and Negative Integers 100

AIMLINE 90 # corrext in 2 m inutes class ave 80 70 60 50 40 Kias TRENDLINE 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4

Baseline Gened instruction 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Targeted Intervention Initiated Unsuccessful Intervention !! Source: Sharon R Schultz, from a presentation/facilitated dialogue entitled RTI: Schoolwide Transformation (Spring 2007) Progress Monitoring for a specific intervention Kia Subtracting Positive and Negative Integers 100 AIMLINE 90 # corrext in 2 m inutes class ave Rule of Four 80 70 60 50 40

Kias TRENDLINE 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 Baseline Gened instruction 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Targeted Intervention Initiated Unsuccessful Intervention !! Source: Sharon R Schultz, from a presentation/facilitated dialogue entitled RTI: Schoolwide Transformation (Spring 2007) Progress Monitoring for a specific intervention Kia Subtracting Positive and Negative Integers class ave Rule of Four

100 90 # correct in 2 minutes 80 AIMLINE 70 60 50 Kias TRENDLINE 40 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4

Baseline Gened instruction 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Targeted Intervention Initiated Targeted Intervention Initiated Another targeted intervention -or- intense intervention? Source: Sharon R Schultz, from a presentation/facilitated dialogue entitled RTI: Schoolwide Transformation (Spring 2007) Monitoring progress How often will skill probes be administered? How many probes will be administered before determining to continue, fade, or change a particular intervention? What is a pattern of inadequate response? How many different interventions at each tier? How much time in each tier? July 2007 IDEA Partnership

39 RTI Symposium Participants included advocates, instructional staff, researchers, and state-level education officials Speakers shared knowledge / expertise, organized around six questions related to RTI implementation in both school districts and research sites Symposium materials (e.g., papers, PowerPoint presentations, video highlights) are available on our website: www.nrcld.org 40 Regional Resource Centers www.rrfcnetwork.org Federal Resource Center Michele Rovins, Director

Region 1: Mid-South Southeast Elizabeth Beale, Director July 2007 Region 4: Kenneth Warlick, Director Region 3: Kristin Reedy, Director

Region 2: Northeast Michael Sharpe, Director Region 5: IDEA Partnership Mountain Plains John Copenhaver, Director Region 6: North Central Western Caroline Moore, Director 41

For More Information: IDEA Partnerships RTI Initiative Website: www.ideapartnership.org July 2007 A Partnership Collection on RTI Many Journals, Many Voices Results for Kids: Resources IDEA Partnership 42 ! . Questions? July 2007 Reflections !

! ? Discussion . IDEA Partnership . ? ! 43

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Diapositiva 1 - CLAD

    Diapositiva 1 - CLAD

    ESAP · EIAPP-CLAD · DNP Bogotá, 23-27 Agosto 2010 Monitoreo y Evaluación para la toma de decisiones: César Nicandro Cruz [email protected]
  • Phase 1/ Area A: Owner Provided Drainage Infrastructure

    Phase 1/ Area A: Owner Provided Drainage Infrastructure

    If impervious cover is constructed on that section for the property, the Tract 1 tenant will need to detain that runoff within their tract. Tracts 6 & 7 are in Phase 1, Area B. Tract 8 can be available in...
  • CHAPTER 11 PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN ADOLESCENCE

    CHAPTER 11 PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN ADOLESCENCE

    Figure 11-8 Downward Trend According to an annual survey, the proportion of students reporting marijuana use over the past 12 months has decreased since 1999. (Source: Johnston et al., 2011.) Adolescence a Definition Adolescence is the developmental stage that spans...
  • Kinetics The Rates and Mechanisms of Chemical Reactions

    Kinetics The Rates and Mechanisms of Chemical Reactions

    Process where energy is released as it proceeds. Heat is given off to surroundings. ... can be done using any of the four available sets of data. Example Problem #1 [HgCl. 2] [C 2 O 4. 2-] Rate ... The...
  • Code Compliance for Stationary Battery Systems

    Code Compliance for Stationary Battery Systems

    A new addition to both NFPA-1 Chapter 52 and IFC Section 1206 imposes a restriction prohibiting a battery installation more than 75 feet above street level fire department vehicle access. Additionally, battery spaces cannot be placed more than 30 feet...
  • Regards sur l'Afrique - Académie de Versailles

    Regards sur l'Afrique - Académie de Versailles

    I. L'empire du Mali, Un empire structuré en expansion autour du Niger. Cours magistral avec documents à l'appui (le cérémonial de présentation au souverain à la cour de Mansa à Niani et dignitaires et courtisans à Niani : Documents 1...
  • Periodic Trends & the Periodic Table - PC\|MAC

    Periodic Trends & the Periodic Table - PC\|MAC

    Periodic Trends & the Periodic Table Periodic Table Periodic Table - arrangement of elements in order of increasing atomic number with elements having similar properties in vertical columns Groups - vertical columns Periods - horizontal rows Group Names Groups Representative...
  • WILL YOUR SAFETY PROGRAM HOLD UP IN COURT?

    WILL YOUR SAFETY PROGRAM HOLD UP IN COURT?

    - adequate hiring policies and standards the same for each hire - no exceptions (negligent entrustment). positive retention - discipline must be the same for all drivers do not keep a driver who shold be terminated (negligent retention).