Pollination - Kyrene School District

Pollination - Kyrene School District

Pollinatio n 6th grade science What is Pollination Pollination: the transfer of pollen from the anther of one flower to the stigma of another flower. Fertilization: occurs when the sperm in the pollen unites with an egg. Brainpop

: Pollination Why is Pollination important? Pollination is how plants reproduce and continue to exist. At least 80% of our world's crop plant species require pollination. It is estimated that 1 out of every 3rd bite of food comes to us through the work of animal pollinators.

PURPOSE OF THE FLOWER To attract pollinators with colorful petals, scent, nectar and pollen Remember plants are rooted in place. They cannot move. Pollen Yellow powder. Fertilizes the eggs. The shape and form of pollen is related to its method of pollination Insect-pollinated species have sticky of barbed pollen grains

Wind-pollinated species is lightweight, small and smooth (corn pollen) Pollinators Since flowers can't move, they need to be able to attract pollinators or be built so that wind is able to pollinate them. Pollinators Wind Bees Butterflies & moths Flies, beetles & insects Birds Bats Flowers attract pollinators with sweet nectar, bright colors, and shapes and structures.

Some flowers open at special times to attract pollinators such as night blooming plants that are pollinated by bats. Wind Most conifers and about 12% of the worlds flowering plants are windpollinated including grasses , the cereal crops; many trees; and ragweed. Small flowers with no bright colors, special odors, or nectar; Most have no petals Release great amounts of pollen so that some pollen reaches stigma of other plants. Large amount of pollen that is smooth,

light, easily airborne; Stigma feathery to catch pollen from wind Bees They live on and depend on the nectar and pollen for food. Bees are guided by sight and smell Bees can see honey guides on flowers which are not visible to humans. See yellow and blue colors, also ultraviolet light (not red it appears dull to them) Prefer cup shaped flowers that have landing pads. Pollinate during the day.

Butterflies and moths Butterflies have a good color vision but poor sense of smell Butterflies can see bright colors like red, orange, and purple Flowers are usually shaped as a long tube because of insects proboscis to get nectar Moth have a good sense of smell & pollinate at night. Flowers are usually white or pale and dull (red, purple, or pink) with sweet, strong odor. Flies , beetles &

insects Flies have a good sense of smell and good vision. Flies like rotten smells and pale to dark colors (dull brown or purple) Beetles have good vision and a good sense of smell. Beetles pollinate flowers that are dull in color (dull white or green), but have very strong odor Birds Birds have a good sense of color, they like yellow or red flowers. Birds do not have a good

sense of smell, so birdpollinated flowers usually have little odor. Flowers provide fluid nectar in greater quantities than insects Bats Bats and are mammals Bats pollinate at night, so flowers are open at night, white, and larger in size. Bats prefer a strong, musty odor. Flowers re bowl shaped.

Bees & Pollination Bees are the most important pollinator. Bees are responsible for 80% of all the pollination in the world. Bee video Examine your bee Why do you think the legs are so hairy? How long are the legs? What do you notice about the eyes? Can you find the combs on the front legs? Bee Facts

Honey bees have FIVE eyes! 3 small on top and 1 on each side of its head. Each eye has thousands of lenses. Bees can see ultraviolet light, which people can't. Because of this they can navigate, even on a cloudy day. Honey bees use the sun as a reference point and the time it takes them to reach the hive to figure out exactly how to tell other bees where to fly to new flowers. Flowers make food for bees. Tiny bits of pollen get on their legs. They drink nectar from the flowers they visit. They make honey from the nectar. They use both honey and pollen as food. When they gather food, bees spread pollen from one flower to another. Bees help flowers make

seed by putting pollen from one flower on the next. How Pollination Happens The bee goes to a flower in search of nectar to eat. While the bee is there, the bee rubs against the anther and some pollen gets on his bee fur. The bees goes to another flower for some more nectar. While on that flower, some of the pollen sticks to the sticky stigma. The pollen travels down the

style into the ovary. The pollen fertilizes the eggs in the ovary to form seeds. Pollination Song Colony Collapse Disorder What would happen if the bees disappeared ?Bees in Danger Flower book Front

Cover Name Date Period Stamen male part (anther & filament) Anther makes pollen Pollen yellow powder fertilizes eggs Pistil female part (stigma, style, & ovary) Stigma sticky, catches pollen Style tube that pollen travels down

Ovary contains eggs Inside Left Insid e Right 1 The bee goes to a flower in search of nectar to eat. 2

While the bee is there, the bee rubs against the anther and some pollen gets on his bee Pollination 3 Fertilizatio n Photosynthes

is The bee goes to another flower for some While on more that flower, nectar. some of the pollen sticks to the sticky stigma. 4

6 5The The pollen travels down the style into the ovary. pollen fertilizes the eggs in the ovary to

form seeds. Inside Right Under leaves Pollination: the transfer of pollen from the anther of one flower to the stigma of another flower. Fertilization: occurs when the sperm in the pollen unites with an egg. Photosynthesis: plants make

their own food; Need: water, light, carbon dioxide. Make glucose (sugar) & oxygen

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