Language Paper 2 Growing Up - English Department

Language Paper 2 Growing Up - English Department

Language Paper 2 Growing Up QUESTION MARKS MINS Read the questions and annotate source 0 10 Question 1 True or False 4 5 Question 2 - Select and Synthesise Source A 3 PEE paragraphs Comparative Connective: However, Whereas, In contrast, Source B 3 PEE paragraphs

Comparative Overview 8 10-12 Question 3 Language Analysis 12 10-15 16 15-20 4 Technique, Evidence, Effect paragraphs word classes and phrases paragraphs on language features paragraphs on sentence forms Question 4 Compare Writers Ideas and Perspectives Overview comparative statement about theme in sources identify text type/content/tone/purpose/narrative mode of each source Source A - Point Evidence

Technique word classes and phrases, language features and techniques, sentence forms and structure Explanation Source B - Comparative/Contrastive Point: On the other hand, Source B Evidence Technique word classes and phrases, language features and techniques, sentence forms and structure Explanation ESSENTIALLY, ITS 6 PETER PARAGRAPHS 3 PETER PARAGRAPHS FOR EACH SOURCE QUESTION 2: AO1: Identify, Interpret, Select and Synthesise Level Level 4 Perceptive, detailed 7-8 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 5-6 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 3-4 marks Level 1 Simple, limited Skill Descriptors

Shows a detailed understanding of differences between the texts Offers perceptive interpretation of both texts Synthesises evidence between texts Selects a range of judicious quotations from both texts Shows a clear understanding of differences between the texts Begins to interpret both texts Demonstrates clear connections between texts Selects relevant quotations/references from both texts to support response Identifies some differences between the texts

Attempts some inference from one/both texts Attempts to link evidence between texts Selects some quotations/references; not always supporting (from one/both texts) Shows simple awareness of difference(s) Offers paraphrase rather than inference Makes simple or no links between texts Simple reference or textual details from one/both texts 1-2 marks Level 0 No marks Candidates in this band will not have offered any differences Nothing to reward Level? Level Level 4 Perceptive, detailed

7-8 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 5-6 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 3-4 marks Level 1 Simple, limited 1-2 marks Level 0 No marks The activities the boy in Source A likes are being noisy and loud. The things he does are silly, like barking. The boy in Source B is also quite noisy but he has more toys like drums to make more noise The boy in Source B has lots of toys to play with Level?like drums and tin trumpets and little whips Level which can be really noisy. On the other hand, the boy in Source A plays with hardly any toys, mainly because he is younger than the other

boy and doesnt need real toys yet. He likes making noises, but he makes the noise himself using his own voice because it says he barks gibberish in the middle of the room instead of playing a musical instrument like the older boy in Source B who is more grown up. Level 4 Perceptive, detailed 7-8 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 5-6 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 3-4 marks Level 1 Simple, limited 1-2 marks Level 0 No marks

In Source A the boy is only a year old but still Level?makes his presence felt around the house by Level making lots of noise, especially when hes tired. He barks gibberish in front of people, which suggests he is immature and likes the attention he gets from showing off. However, the boy in Source B is older and more independent and has real toys to play with, like drums and tin trumpets, which give him the opportunity to be more musical and more mature, rather than just shouting gibberish in the middle of the room like the boy in Source A. Level 4 Perceptive, detailed 7-8 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 5-6 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 3-4 marks

Level 1 Simple, limited 1-2 marks Level 0 No marks The activities of the boy in Source A are limited compared to Victorian boy who has a wider choice of exciting and Level?the adventurous games to play. The toddler in Source A enjoys Level Level 4 making a noise, exploring the sound effect of his own voice as Perceptive, detailed he barks gibberish in the middle of the room. His noisy 7-8 marks outburst takes all his energy as he throws his entire body into Level 3 Clear, relevant it showing how, at this self-centred stage of development, he 5-6 marks just wants to express himself and attract attention. In contrast, Level 2 the Victorian boy makes his own noise with a hearty shout but

Some, attempts has also been given purpose-built musical toys such as drums 3-4 marks and tin trumpets. He is at a different stage of maturity and Level 1 Simple, limited needs more stimulation to develop his creativity, although 1-2 marks perhaps both the boys trumpet tooting and the toddlers Level 0 gibberish are just as irritating for any parent listening. No marks QUESTION 3: AO2 Language Analysis Level Skill Descriptors This question assesses Language ie: Words / Phrases / Language Features / Language Techniques / Sentence Forms Level 4 Detailed, perceptive 10-12 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 7-9 marks

Level 2 Some, attempts 4-6 marks Level 1 Simple, limited 1-3 marks Level 0 No marks Shows detailed and perceptive understanding of language: Analyses the effects of the writers choices of language Selects a judicious range of textual detail Makes sophisticated and accurate use of subject terminology Shows clear understanding of language: Explains clearly the effects of the writers choices of language Selects a range of relevant textual detail Makes clear and accurate use of subject terminology Shows detailed and perceptive understanding of language: Analyses the effects of the writers choices of language Selects a judicious range of textual detail Makes sophisticated and accurate use of subject terminology Shows simple awareness of language: Offers simple comment on the effect of language Selects simple references or textual details Makes simple use of subject terminology, not always appropriately

No ideas offered about differences Nothing to reward Level? Level Level 4 Detailed, perceptive 10-12 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 7-9 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 4-6 marks Level 1 Simple, limited 1-3 marks Level 0 No marks The writer uses metaphorical language to describe his son as a sleepy ball, providing the reader with an endearing image of a contented infant curled up, still in the foetal position, suggesting he is very newly born. The adjective sleepy conjures up the image of the peace

and tranquillity associated with a drowsy baby and a sense of innocence. The phrase scrunched-up flesh sounds affectionate but comical, and implies that the childs individual features are unformed and unrecognisable he looks just like any other baby. Level? Level Level 4 Detailed, perceptive 10-12 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 7-9 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 4-6 marks Level 1 Simple, limited 1-3 marks Level 0 No marks The writer starts with a metaphor to describe his new born baby son as a sleepy ball of scrunchedup flesh. The image of a sleepy ball gives a sense

of the baby curled up, cosy and snuggled, whilst the phrase scrunched-up flesh shows how difficult it was to make out his sons features. The word scrunched suggests that the babys face is crumpled and creased. Level? Level Level 4 Detailed, perceptive 10-12 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 7-9 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 4-6 marks Level 1 Simple, limited 1-3 marks Level 0 No marks The writer uses imagery in the phrase a sleepy ball of scrunched-up flesh to describe

what his son looked like when he was a baby. This is a metaphor and suggests that the baby is curled up and doesnt really look like a person. When he says scrunched-up you can imagine what the baby looks like as it will be all wrinkled. Level? Level Level 4 Detailed, perceptive 10-12 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 7-9 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 4-6 marks Level 1 Simple, limited 1-3 marks Level 0 No marks The writer uses the words a sleepy

ball to describe his son as a baby. The phrase makes you think that he looks like a ball and that all he did was sleep. This is a metaphor which means the writer compares one thing to another. QUESTION 4: AO3 - Compare writers ideas and perspectives Level Skill Descriptors Compare writers ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts Level 4 Detailed, perceptive 13-16 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 9-12 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 5-8 marks Level 1

Simple, limited 1-4 marks Level 0 No marks Shows a detailed understanding of the differences between the ideas and perspectives Compares ideas and perspectives in a perceptive way Analyses how methods are used to convey ideas and perspectives Selects range of judicious quotations from both texts Shows a clear understanding of differences between the ideas and perspectives Compares ideas and perspectives in a clear and relevant way Explains clearly how methods are used to convey ideas and perspectives Selects relevant quotations to support from both texts

Identifies some differences between the ideas and perspectives Attempts to compare ideas and perspectives Some comment on how methods are used to convey ideas and perspectives Selects some quotations/references, not always supporting (from one or both texts) Simple awareness of different ideas and/or perspectives Simple cross reference of ideas and/or perspectives Simple identification of how differences are conveyed Simple references or textual details from one or both texts No ideas offered about differences Nothing to reward Heritage, a 21stC father, is incredulous at how the first year Level?has flown; he blinked and the transformation from baby to

toddler seemed to happen overnight. There is clearly a tone of Level fatherly pride as he describes his sons growing independence; Level 4 Detailed, perceptive blasting ahead suggests he is powering through each stage of 13-16 marks development with unstoppable force. The Victorian mother of Level 3 Source B, however, although perhaps secretly proud of his Clear, relevant 9-12 marks manly figure, conveys her feelings of sadness that her son no Level 2 longer needs her: It is a long while now since he disappeared, Some, attempts 5-8 marks implying the loss is literal, whereas it is in fact metaphorical Level 1 the mother has emotionally, not physically, lost him. She uses Simple, limited 1-4 marks a repetitive structure to emphasise her tone of regret. Each Level 0 No marks paragraph begins with the guests views on the positive

aspects of life without young children, which is, ironically, the opposite of how the mother feels. Level?The writer of Source A, a modern father, is both saddened and Level Level 4 Detailed, perceptive 13-16 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 9-12 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 5-8 marks Level 1 Simple, limited 1-4 marks Level 0 No marks pleased by his sons growth. He finds it difficult to accept that time is moving so quickly; he blinked and his son is already a year old. However, the pleasure he feels is also obvious, using phrases like blasting ahead to suggest his son is metaphorically taking off like a rocket before his eyes. In

contrast, the writer of Source B, who presents a Victorian mothers perspective, has a negative reaction to her son growing into a young man. She conveys a sense of loss at his independence, even using the phrase My little boy is lost. By using the word lost we understand that she no longer sees herself as part of his life and she regrets that he is no longer dependent on her to replace lost buttons. Level?In Level Level 4 Detailed, perceptive 13-16 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 9-12 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 5-8 marks Level 1 Simple, limited 1-4 marks Level 0 No marks

Source A the writer is pleased that his son is growing up and doing more. He uses language to describe the things he can do and says that his son is blasting ahead, which suggests that he thinks his son is progressing quickly. On the other hand, in Source B the writer is sad because her son has now grown up. One method she uses to show this is by writing a list of all the things she still wishes she could do for him like replace lost buttons and obliterate mud stains, suggesting that she misses the way he relied on her for everything. Level?The writer of Source A feels happy that his Level Level 4 Detailed, perceptive 13-16 marks Level 3 Clear, relevant 9-12 marks Level 2 Some, attempts 5-8 marks Level 1 Simple, limited

1-4 marks Level 0 No marks son is getting older. He wants to tell us about all the things his one year old son can now do. He includes lots of examples and uses words like blasting ahead. However, the writer of Source B isnt happy about her son growing up. She misses what he was like when he was a baby.

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