Health & Safety Management Systems

Health & Safety Management Systems

WHMIS 2015 Workshop Welcome Your instructor for this workshop is: CCSA who we are and what we do Safety first! 2 Workshop Agenda Workshop Introduction Learning Objectives Introductions Unit 1: What is WHMIS? Unit 2: Hazard Classification

Unit 3: WHMIS Labels Break Unit 4: Safety Data Sheets Unit 5: WHMIS Education Unit 6: Putting WHMIS to Work Exercise: Putting WHMIS to Work 3 Workshop Introduction Source: https://youtu.be/73OCF3evoyg 4 Workshop Introduction 5

What is WHMIS? What is a hazardous material? Workshop Introduction What is GHS? WHMIS 1988 vs. WHMIS 2015 6 7 Transition to WHMIS 2015 Suppliers Phases

1 2 3 4 WHMIS Transition From coming-into-force to May 3, 2017 From June 1, 2017 to May 31, 2018 From June 1, 2018 to November 30, 2018 December 1, 2018

Manufacturers and Importers Distributors Employers * Comply with WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 requirements Comply with WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 requirements Consult Alberta Government

Comply with WHMIS 2015 requirements Comply with WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 requirements Comply with WHMIS 1988 or WHMIS 2015 requirements Comply with WHMIS 2015 requirements Comply with WHMIS 2015 requirements Comply with WHMIS

1988 or WHMIS 2015 requirements Comply with WHMIS 2015 requirements Comply with WHMIS 2015 requirements Comply with WHMIS 2015 requirements Learning Objectives 1. Identify requirements for employers during the WHMIS 2015 transition period (intro) 2. Define WHMIS (intro and unit 1) 3. Describe the four main elements of WHMIS 2015 (unit 1) 4. Explain how hazardous materials can impact worker

health and safety (intro and unit 1) 5. Describe the two classes of hazards (unit 2) 8 Learning Objectives 6. Identify the hazard class based on the hazard pictogram (unit 2) 7. Explain the requirements of appropriate supplier and workplace WHMIS labels and the proper use of each (unit 3) 8. Report WHMIS labels that are not appropriate (unit 3) 9. Reference important information for workers using the supplier or workplace label (unit 3) 10.Create a WHMIS 2015 Workplace Label, when required (unit 3) 9

Learning Objectives 11.Reference important information for workers on an Safety Data Sheet (SDS) (unit 4) 12.Select appropriate Personal Protective Equipment based on the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) (unit 4) 13.Explain the first aid requirements based on the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) (unit 4) 14.Discuss worker education and training requirements (unit 5) 10 Introductions 11 12

Unit 1: What is WHMIS? W H M I S Workplace Hazardous Materials

Informatio n System Four Main Elements 1. Hazard Classificatio n 2. Labels 3. Safety Data Sheets 4. Worker Education

13 14 SDS WHMIS Labels Informed Worker ss iiddee v v o o PPrr

M Maa yy PP rroovv iiddee Employer ss iiddee v v o o PPrr PPrroo

vviidd eess Federal LegislationSupplier WHMIS Education & Training 15 Federal Legislation responsible for disclosure of contents and proper labeling

Manufacturer s & Suppliers Employers responsible for providing safe handling of hazardous materials and to provide worker training responsible to use WHMIS to ensure their own safety and the safety of others on the job Workers

AB OHS Act, Regulation and Code AB OHS Code, Part 29 Section 395: Application Section 400: Decanted products Section 397: Training Section 398: Label required Section 401: Placards

Section 404: Material safety data sheet employer Section 406: Information current Section 407: Availability of msds 16 Unit 2: Hazard Classification What is a hazard? a situation, condition

or thing that may be dangerous to the health and safety of workers. Biological hazards Chemical hazards Physical hazards Psychologic al hazards 17

Hazard Classification WHMIS 1988 vs. WHMIS 2015 New hazard class names for example, Class A (Compressed Gases) is now Gases under Pressure New classification rules or criteria A few new hazard classes for example, Aspiration Hazard 18 Hazard Groups

19 Physical Hazards Group Based on the physical or chemical properties of the product. Such as: flammability, reactivity, or corrosivity to metals. Health Hazards Group Based on the ability of the product to cause a health effect.

Such as: eye irritation, respiratory sensitization, or carcinogenicity 20 Hazard Classes Physical Hazards Hazard Class Main Concerns Flammable gases These four classes cover products that have the ability to ignite (catch fire) easily and the main hazards are fire or explosion. Flammable aerosols

Flammable liquids Flammable solids Oxidizing gases Oxidizing liquids Oxidizing solids These three classes cover oxidizers, which may cause or intensify a fire or cause a fire or explosion. Hazard Classes 21 Physical Hazards Hazard Class Gases under pressure

Main Concerns These gases are hazardous because of the high pressure inside the cylinder or container. The cylinder or container may explode if heated. Refrigerated liquefied gases are very cold and can cause severe cold (cryogenic) burns or injury. 22 Hazard Classes Physical Hazards Hazard Class Self-reactive substances and mixtures Pyrophoric liquids Pyrophoric solids Pyrophoric gases

Main Concerns These products may react on their own to cause a fire or explosion, or may cause a fire or explosion if heated. These products can catch fire very quickly (spontaneously) if exposed to air. Hazard Classes 23 Physical Hazards Hazard Class Self-heating substances and mixtures Substances and mixtures which, in

contact with water, emit flammable gases Main Concerns These products may catch fire if exposed to air. These products differ from pyrophoric liquids or solids in that they will ignite only after a longer period of time or when in large amounts. As the class name suggests, these products react with water to release flammable gases. In some cases, the flammable gases may ignite very quickly (spontaneously). Hazard Classes 24

Physical Hazards Hazard Class Organic peroxides Corrosive to metals Combustible dust Simple asphyxiants Main Concerns These products may cause a fire or explosion if heated. These products may be corrosive (chemically damage or destroy) to metals. This class is used to warn of products that are finely divided solid particles. If dispersed in air, the particles may catch fire or explode if ignited. These products may displace oxygen in air

and cause rapid suffocation. Hazard Classes 25 Physical Hazards Hazard Class Physical hazards not otherwise classified Main Concerns This class is meant to cover any hazards that are not covered in any other physical hazard class. These hazards must have the characteristic of occurring by chemical reaction and result in the serious injury or death of a person at the time the reaction

occurs. If a product is classified in this class, the hazard statement on the label and SDS will describe the nature of the hazard. Hazard Classes 26 Health Hazards Hazard Class Main Concern Acute toxicity These products are fatal, toxic or harmful if inhaled, following skin contact, or if swallowed. Acute toxicity refers to effects occurring following skin

contact or ingestion exposure to a single dose, or multiple doses given within 24 hours, or an inhalation exposure of 4 hours. Acute toxicity could result from exposure to the product itself, or to a product that, upon contact with water, releases a gaseous substance that is able to cause acute toxicity. Hazard Classes 27 Health Hazards Hazard Class Skin corrosion/irritation Main Concern This class covers products that cause severe skin

burns (i.e., corrosion) and products that cause skin irritation. Serious eye damage/eye This class covers products that cause serious eye irritation damage (i.e., corrosion) and products that eye irritation. Respiratory or skin sensitization A respiratory sensitizer is a product that may cause allergy or asthma symptoms or breathing difficulties if inhaled. Skin sensitizer is a product that may cause an allergic skin reaction. Hazard Classes 28 Health Hazards Hazard Class

Main Concern Germ cell mutagenicity This hazard class includes products that may cause or are suspected of causing genetic defects (permanent changes (mutations) to body cells that can be passed on to future generations). This hazard class includes products that cause or are suspected of causing cancer. This hazard class includes products that may damage or are suspected of damaging fertility or the unborn child (baby). Carcinogenicity Reproductive toxicity

Note: There is an additional category which includes products that may cause harm to breast-fed children. Hazard Classes 29 Health Hazards Hazard Class Specific target organ toxicity single exposure Specific target organ toxicity repeated exposure Main Concern This hazard class covers products that cause or may cause damage to organs (e.g., liver, kidneys,

or blood) following a single exposure. This class also includes a category for products that cause respiratory irritation or drowsiness or dizziness. This hazard class covers products that cause or may cause damage to organs (e.g., liver, kidneys, or blood) following prolonged or repeated exposure. Hazard Classes 30 Health Hazards Hazard Class Aspiration hazard Bio-hazardous infectious materials

Main Concern This hazard class is for products that may be fatal if they are swallowed and enter the airways. These materials are microorganisms, nucleic acids or proteins that cause or is a probably cause of infection, with or without toxicity, in humans or animals. Hazard Classes 31 Health Hazards Hazard Class Health hazards not otherwise classified

Main Concern This class covers products that are not included in any other health hazard class and have the characteristic of occurring following acute or repeated exposure and resulting in the death of a person exposed to the product, or have an adverse effect on that person's health - including injury. If a product is classified in this class, the hazard statement will describe the nature of the hazard. 32 Pictograms WHMIS 1988 Symbols vs. WHMIS 2015 Pictograms WHMIS 1988 Symbols WHMIS 2015 Pictograms

33 WHMIS 2015 Pictograms Flame for fire hazards Flame over Circle Gas Cylinder For oxidizing hazards

For gases under pressure Corrosion for corrosive damage to metals as well as skin and eyes Exploding Bomb for explosion or

reactivity hazards 34 WHMIS 2015 Pictograms Skull and Crossbones can cause death or toxicity with short exposure or small amounts Health Hazard may cause or suspected of

causing serious health effects Exclamation Mark may cause less serious health effects or damage the ozone layer Biohazardous Infectious Materials for organisms or toxins that can cause diseases in people or

animals Environmental *Not adopted by WHMIS 2015* may cause damage to the aquatic environment WHMIS 2015 Pictograms 35 Do all hazard classes and categories require a pictogram? WHMIS 2015 classes and categories that do not require a pictogram are: Flammable gases - Category 2

Flammable liquids - Category 4 Self-reactive substances and mixtures - Type G Organic peroxides - Type G Combustible dusts - Category 1 Simple asphyxiants - Category 1 Serious eye damage/eye irritation - Eye irritation - Category 2B Reproductive toxicity - Effects on or via lactation WHMIS 2015 Pictograms Where will you find the pictograms? 36 Exemptions from WHMIS 1. Fully Exempt Products excluded from all aspects of WHMIS are:

Wood and products made of wood Tobacco and products made of tobacco Manufactured articles Dangerous goods while they are covered by TDG legislation Hazardous wastes 37 Exemptions from WHMIS 38 2. Partially Exempt Products partially excluded from some aspects of WHMIS include: Product

In Canada, these products are covered by: Explosives Explosives Act Cosmetics, devices, and food and drugs Food and Drug Act Pesticides and herbicides Pest Control Product Act Radioactive materials Nuclear Safety and Control Act

Consumer products Canada Consumer Product Safety Act Exemptions from WHMIS 2. Partially Exempt While WHMIS label and SDS requirements do not apply to partially exempt products, the employer is still required to provide WHMIS training for workers using or working near them. 39

Unit 1 & 2 Check Your Understanding 40 Unit 3: WHMIS Labels WHMIS 1988 vs. WHMIS 2015 Supplier Labels 41 42 WHMIS Labeling Two main types of WHMIS Labels: Supplier Labels Workplace Labels

42 WHMIS 2015 Supplier Labels 43 WHMIS 2015 Supplier Labels What is a SIGNAL WORD? 44 WHMIS 2015 Supplier Labels What is a HAZARD STATEMENT? 45 WHMIS 2015 Supplier Labels What is a PRECAUTIONARY STATEMENT?

46 47 Variations to Supplier Labels Variations on the supplier label apply for specific items such as: Bulk shipments. 100 mL or less 3mL or less Employers are required to teach workers about any of the variations they might see at the worksite. 47 Workplace Labels 48

Three pieces of information required: 1. Product Name 2. Information for Safe Handling 3. Reference to SDS Workplace Labels A workplace label is required when: a hazardous product is produced (made) at the workplace and used in that workplace, a hazardous product is transferred or poured into another container, or a supplier label becomes lost or unreadable.

49 Workplace Labels 50 When is a workplace label not required? 1. Poured into a container and it is going to be used immediately, or 2. "Under the control of the person who decanted it". What do you need to do? 51 Always check to see if there is a label on the product before you use

it. Read, understand and follow the instructions on the label and SDS. Follow any additional education, instructions, and training as provided by your employer. Ask your supervisor if you are not sure about how to use or store it. Ask for a new label when the old one cannot be seen or read properly. Do not use a product that is not labelled or if the label is unreadable. Ask your supervisor for help (e.g., to replace the label). Exercise: Using WHMIS 2015 Supplier and Workplace Labels 52 Unit 4: WHMIS 2015 Safety Data Sheets (SDS) WHMIS 1988 MSDS vs. WHMIS 2015 SDS

WHMIS 1988 Material Safety Data Sheets 9-Sections MSDS cannot be older than 3 years, and must be updated when new information is available. WHMIS 2015 Safety Data Sheets 16-Sections No expiry date, must be updated when significantly new data is available. 53 54

SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 Section 1 Product Identification and Use Section 1 Identification WHMIS 2015 Description Product identifier (e.g. Product name) Other means of identification (e.g. product family, synonyms, etc.)

Recommended use Restrictions on use Canadian supplier identifiers+ Name, full address and phone number(s)

Emergency telephone number and any restrictions on the use of that number, if applicable SDS Example: 55 56 SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 WHMIS 2015 Description

Section 2 Hazardous Ingredients Section 2 Hazard identification Hazard classification (class, category) of substance or mixture or a description of the identified hazard for Physical or Health Hazards Not Otherwise Classified Label elements: o Symbol (image) or the name of the symbol (e.g., flame, skull and crossbones) o Signal word o Hazard statement(s) o Precautionary statement(s) Other hazards which do not result in classification (e.g.,

molten metal hazard) SDS Example: 57 58 SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 WHMIS 2015 Description Section 3

Physical Data Section 3 Composition/ Information on ingredients When a hazardous product is a material or substance: o Chemical name o Common name and synonyms o Chemical Abstract Service (CAS) registry number and any unique identifiers o Chemical name of impurities, stabilizing solvents and/or additives For each material or substance in a mixture that is classified in a health hazard class:

o Chemical name o Common name and synonyms o CAS registry number and any unique identifiers o Concentration NOTE: Confidential business rules can apply SDS Example: 59 60 SDS Explanation of Each Section

WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 WHMIS 2015 Description Section 4 Fire and Explosion Data Section 4 First- First-aid measures by route of exposure: o Inhalation aid measures o Skin contact o Eye contact o Ingestion Most important symptoms and effects (acute or delayed)

Immediate medical attention and special treatment, if necessary SDS Example: 61 62 SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 WHMIS 2015 Description

Section 5 Reactivity Data Section 5 - Fire- Suitable and unsuitable extinguishing media Specific hazards arising from the hazardous product fighting (e.g., hazardous combustion products) measures Special protective equipment and precautions for firefighters SDS Example: 63 64

SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 WHMIS 2015 Description Section 6 Toxicological Properties Section 6 Accidental release measures Personal precautions, protective equipment and emergency procedures

Methods and materials for containment and cleaning up SDS Example: 65 66 SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 WHMIS 2015 Description

Section 7 Preventative Measures Section 7 Handling and storage Personal precautions, protective equipment and emergency procedures Methods and materials for containment and cleaning up SDS Example: 67 68

SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 Section 8 First Section 8 Aid Procedures Exposure controls/ Personal protection WHMIS 2015 Description Control parameters, including occupational exposure guidelines or biological exposure limits and the source of those values Appropriate engineering controls

Individual protection measures (e.g. personal protective equipment) SDS Example: 69 70 SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 Section 9 Section 9 Preparation Date Physical and

of MSDS chemical properties WHMIS 2015 Description

Appearance (physical state, colour, etc.) Odour Odour threshold pH Melting point/Freezing point Initial boiling point/boiling range Flash point Evaporation rate Flammability (solid; gas) Lower flammable/explosive limit Upper flammable/explosive limit

Vapour pressure Vapour density Relative density Solubility Partition coefficient - n-octanol/water Auto-ignition temperature Decomposition temperature Viscosity SDS Example: 71 72 SDS Explanation of Each Section

WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 Section 10 N/A Section 10 Stability and reactivity *Included in section 5 WHMIS 2015 Description Reactivity Chemical stability

Possibility of hazardous reactions Conditions to avoid (e.g., static discharge, shock, or vibration) Incompatible materials Hazardous decomposition products SDS Example: 73 74 SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015

Section 11 N/A Section 11 Toxicological information * Included in section 6 WHMIS 2015 Description Concise but complete description of the various toxic health effects and the data used to identify those effects, including: Information on the likely routes of exposure (inhalation, ingestion, skin and eye contact) Symptoms related to the physical, chemical and toxicological characteristics Delayed and immediate effects, and chronic effects from short-term and long-term exposure Numerical measures of toxicity

SDS Example: 75 76 SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 Section 12 N/A Section 12 Ecological information WHMIS 2015 Description

Ecotoxicity Persistence and degradability Bioaccumulative potential Mobility in soil Other adverse effects SDS Example: 77

78 SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 Section 13 N/A Section 13 Disposal considerations WHMIS 2015 Description

Ecotoxicity Persistence and degradability Bioaccumulative potential Mobility in soil Other adverse effects SDS Example: 79 80 SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988

WHMIS 2015 Section 14 N/A Section 14 Transport Information WHMIS 2015 Description UN number UN proper shipping name

Transport hazard class(es) Packing group Environmental hazards Transport in bulk, if applicable Special precautions SDS Example: 81 82 SDS Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015

Section 15 N/A Section 15 Regulatory Information WHMIS 2015 Description Safety, health and environmental regulations specific to the product SDS Example: 83 84 SDS

Explanation of Each Section WHMIS 1988 WHMIS 2015 Section 16 N/A Section 16 Other Information WHMIS 2015 Description Date of the latest revision of the SDS SDS Example: 85

SDS Example: 86 SDS When is an updated SDS required? SDSs are required to be accurate at the time of sale. An SDS will be required to be updated when the supplier becomes aware of any "significant new data". 87 88 SDS What are employers responsibilities?

Ensure there is an up-to-date SDS when it enters the workplace. Make sure the SDSs are readily available to the workers. SDS Why are they so hard to understand? 89 90 SDS Why should workers be aware of the SDS? 1. Identification

2. Hazards 3. Prevention 4. Response For the product and supplier. Physical (fire and reactivity) Health Steps you can take to work safely, reduce or prevent exposure, or in an emergency.

Appropriate responses in various situations (e.g. firstaid, fire, accidental release) Four main purposes of the SDS 91 SDS What should workers do before working with a hazardous product? Read the name of the chemical (Section 1) Identify the hazards (Section 2)

Determine what to do in an emergency (Sections 4, 5 & 6) Identify safe handling and storage instructions (Section 7) SDS Important considerations: Use the product as intended, refer to Section 1 of the SDS The SDS provides information about potential hazards, but may not be specific During the transition period, suppliers may provide either MSDSs (WHMIS 1988) or SDSs

(WHMIS 2015) 92 93 Exercise: Using WHMIS 2015 Safety Data Sheets (SDS) Safety Data Sheet Cleans SUPER Great Unit 5: WHMIS Education Provides the knowledge needed by workers who work with or close to hazardous products to protect their health and safety There are two main

types of Education: Generi c Site Specific 94 Generic Education 95 Workers are taught: The basic concepts of WHMIS How chemicals enter/affect the body The purpose and significance of WHMIS Labels

The purpose and significance of SDSs Any other useful general information about WHMIS and chemicals Site Specific Education Focused on the workplace-specific conditions: Hazardous products used at your workplace Procedures for handling and storage Disposal of hazardous waste Location and preparation of workplace labels Location of SDSs Emergency procedures 96 97 Refresher Education

When is refresher WHMIS education required? Protect worker health and safety Changes to workplace conditions New products Product changes New

information is available New safe use, handling or storage information WHMIS Standard of Education 98 Can workers answer these questions? 1. What is the product? 2. What are the

hazards of each hazardous product? 4. What do I do in case of an emergency? 3. How can I safely work with the product? What precautions should I take to reduce my exposure? 5. Where can I get additional hazard information? Putting WHMIS to Work

Steps to implement an effective WHMIS program: Step 1. Assign responsibility for coordination Step 2. Develop an inventory of all hazardous products Step 3. Ensure MSDS and/or SDS are available 99 Putting WHMIS to Work Steps to implement an effective WHMIS program: Step 4. Ensure labeling is appropriate Step 5. Determine hazards to workers Step 6. Ensure adequate controls are in place 100

Putting WHMIS to Work Steps to implement an effective WHMIS program: Step 7. Establish emergency procedures Step 8. Develop a worker education program Step 9. Review and update program 101 102 Exercise: Putting WHMIS to work Lori Alber

t Mary Sam 103 Workshop Summary 1. Identify requirements for employers during the WHMIS 2015 transition period 2. Define WHMIS 4. Explain how

hazardous materials can impact worker health and safety 3. Describe the four main elements of WHMIS 2015 5. Describe the two classes of hazards Physical Hazards Group Based on the physical or chemical properties of the product. Such as: flammability, reactivity,

or corrosivity to metals. Health Hazards Group Based on the ability of the product to cause a health effect. Such as: eye irritation, respiratory sensitization, or carcinogenicity 104 Workshop Summary 6. Identify the hazard class based on the hazard pictogram

7. Explain the requirements of appropriate supplier and workplace WHMIS labels and the proper use of each 9. Reference important information for workers using the supplier or workplace label 8. Report WHMIS labels that are not appropriate 10. Create a WHMIS 2015 Workplace Label, when required

Workshop Summary Read Read the the name name of of the the chemical chemical (Section (Section 1) 1) Identify Identify the the hazards hazards (Section 2) (Section

2) Determine Determine what what to to do do in in an an emergency emergency (Sections (Sections 4, 5 & 6) 4, 5 & 6)

Identify Identify safe safe handling handling and and storage storage instructions instructions (Section 7) (Section 7) 11. Reference important information for workers on an Safety Data Sheet (SDS) 12. Select appropriate

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) based on the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) 13. Explain the first aid requirements based on the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) 14. Discuss worker education and training requirements 105 Thank you for your participation!

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