Editor PPT - OMICS Publishing Group

Editor PPT - OMICS Publishing Group

OMICS Journals are welcoming Submissions OMICS International welcomes submissions that are original and technically so as to serve both the developing world and developed countries in the best possible way. OMICS Journals are poised in excellence by publishing high quality research. OMICS International follows an Editorial Manager System peer review process and boasts of a strong and active editorial board. Editors and reviewers are experts in their field and provide anonymous, unbiased and detailed reviews of all submissions. The journal gives the options of multiple language translations for all the articles and all archived articles are available in HTML, XML, PDF and audio formats. Also, all the published articles are archived in repositories and indexing services like DOAJ, CAS, Google Scholar, Scientific Commons, Index Copernicus, EBSCO, HINARI and GALE. For more details please visit our website: http:// omicsonline.org/Submitmanuscript.php

Wuyi Liu, Ph.D Professor Department of Biology Sciences Fuyang Normal University China Dr. Wuyi Liu Biography Wuyi Liu Is a geneticist and animal breeding expert, being good at phylogenetics, bioinformatics, genomics and genetics. Wuyi Liu learned from agricultural universities. During 1997-2004, Wuyi Liu began the academic career and got my Bachelor and M.Sc. from Anhui Agricultural University, majoring in animal sciences and statistical genetics. During 2007-2010, Wuyi Liu was engaged in advanced studies in China Agricultural University and got my Ph.D., majoring in animal genetics and genomics and bioinformatics. At present, Wuyi Liu am interested in the following subject areas: phylogenetics and clade inferring, mitochondrial

DNA data, genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, statistical genetics, population genetics and evolution, bioinformatics, biotechnology, statistical genomics, animal ecology. Dr. Wuyi Liu Research Interests Presently, Wuyi Liu am interested in the following subject areas, i.e. phylogenetics and clade inferring, mitochondrial DNA, genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, statistical genetics, population genetics and evolution biology, bioinformatics, biotechnology, statistical genomics, animal ecology. Dr. Wuyi Liu Publications

Liu WY and Chen HQ. Study on the Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA of Yellow Cattle in Northern Anhui Province. China Cattle Science, 2004, 32(2): 8-11. Liu W. and C. Zhao, 2010. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the chicken basic helix-loop-helix factors. Comp. Funct. Genomics, 2010: 1-12. Liu W., C. Zhao and J. Li, 2010. A non-invasive and inexpensive PCRbased procedure for rapid sex diagnosis of Chinese gamecock chicks and embryos. J. Anim. Vet. Adv., 9: 962-970. Liu W. and C. Zhao, 2010. Comprehensive genetic analysis with mitochondrial DNA data reveals the population evolution relationship between chinese gamecocks and their neighboring native chicken breeds. Asian J. Anim. Vet. Adv., 5: 388-401. Liu W. and K. Zhang, 2011. Rapid Salt-extraction of genomic DNA

from Formalin-fixed toad and frog tissues for PCR-based analyses. Asian J. Anim. Vet. Adv., 6: 958-965. Liu W. and C. Zhao, 2011. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of zebra finch basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors. Biochem. Genetics, 49: 226-241. Phylogenetics Phylogenetics is the study of evolutionary relationships among groups of organisms (e.g. species, populations), which are discovered through molecular sequencing data and morphological data matrices Phylogenetic systematics All life on Earth is united by evolutionary history; we are all evolutionary cousins twigs on the tree of life. Phylogenetic systematics is the formal name for the field within biology that reconstructs

evolutionary history and studies the patterns of relationships among organisms. Unfortunately, history is not something we can see. It has only happened once and only leaves behind clues as to what happened. Systematists use these clues to try to reconstruct evolutionary history ( http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/ph ylogenetics_01 ) Purpose of phylogenetics With the aid of sequences, it should be possible to find the genealogical ties between organisms. Experience learns that closely related organisms have similar sequences, more distantly related organisms have more dissimilar sequences. One

objective is to reconstruct the evolutionary relationship between species. An other objective is to estimate the time of divergence between two organisms since they last shared a common ancestor. ( http://users.ugent.be/~avierstr/principles/phylogeny .html ) Disclaimers The theory and practical applications of the different models are not universally accepted. With one dataset, different software packages can give different results. Changes in the dataset can also give different results. Therefore it is

important to have a good alignment to start with. Trees based on an alignment of a gene represent the relationship between genes and this is not necessarily the same relationship as between the whole organisms. If trees are calculated based on different genes from organisms, it is possible that these trees result in different relationships. Terminology node : a node represents a taxonomic unit. This can be a taxon (an existing species) or an ancestor (unknown species : represents the ancestor of 2 or

more species). branch : defines the relationship between the taxa in terms of descent and ancestry. topology : is the branching pattern. branch length : often represents the number of changes that have occurred in that branch. root : is the common ancestor of all taxa. distance scale : scale which represents the number of differences between sequences (e.g. 0.1 means 10 % differences between two sequences) Possible ways of drawing a tree Trees can be drawn in different ways. There are trees with unscaled branches and with scaled branches. Unscaled branches : the length is not proportional to the number of changes. Sometimes, the number of changes are indicated on

the branches with numbers. The nodes represents the divergence event on a time scale. Scaled branches : the length of the branch is proportional to the number of changes. The distance between 2 species is the sum of the length of all branches connecting them. Is is also possible to draw these trees with or without a root. For rooted trees, the root is the common ancestor. For each species, there is a unique path that leads from the root to that species. The direction of each path corresponds to evolutionary time. An unrooted tree specifies the relationships among species and does not define the evolutionary path. Methods of phylogenetic analysis Trees can be drawn in different ways. There are trees with unscaled branches and with scaled branches. Unscaled branches : the length is not proportional to the number of

changes. Sometimes, the number of changes are indicated on the branches with numbers. The nodes represents the divergence event on a time scale. Scaled branches : the length of the branch is proportional to the number of changes. The distance between 2 species is the sum of the length of all branches connecting them. Is is also possible to draw these trees with or without a root. For rooted trees, the root is the common ancestor. For each species, there is a unique path that leads from the root to that species. The direction of each path corresponds to evolutionary time. An unrooted tree specifies the relationships among species and does not define the evolutionary path. Methods of phylogenetic analysis Trees can be drawn in different ways. There are trees with

unscaled branches and with scaled branches. Unscaled branches : the length is not proportional to the number of changes. Sometimes, the number of changes are indicated on the branches with numbers. The nodes represents the divergence event on a time scale. Scaled branches : the length of the branch is proportional to the number of changes. The distance between 2 species is the sum of the length of all branches connecting them. Is is also possible to draw these trees with or without a root. For rooted trees, the root is the common ancestor. For each species, there is a unique path that leads from the root to that species. The direction of each path corresponds to evolutionary time. An unrooted tree specifies the relationships among species and does not define the evolutionary path. OMICS International Open Access Membership Open Open Access Access Membership Membership with

with OMICS OMICS International International enables enables academic academic and and research research institutions, institutions, funders funders and and corporations corporations to to actively actively encourage encourage open open access access in in scholarly scholarly communication

communication and and the the dissemination dissemination of of research research published published by by their their authors. authors. For For more more details details and and benefits, benefits, click click on on the the link

link below: below: http://omicsonline.org/membership.php http://omicsonline.org/membership.php Thank you. Wuyi Liu Professor Department of Biology Sciences Fuyang Normal University China

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