Chapter 9

Chapter 9

Chapter 9 Carbon in Life and Materials Warm Up (2-26-16) Write down everything you know about the element Carbon. Try to be as specific as possible.

Outline Objectives Read Ch. 9 Notes Ch. 9 Objectives

Students will be able to explain how carbon is important for life. Students will be able to identify which organisms contain carbon and the benefits that carbon provides those organisms. Warm Up (2-29-16)

Why can carbon form many different compounds? What is so special about this element that allows it to do so? Outline Objectives 9.2 notes

Objectives Students will explain the importance of carbon in living things Students will be able to identify the different structures of carbon molecules.

9.1 Carbon based molecules have many structures Living and nonliving things contain carbon Carbon is the most important element for life Organic Compound: based on carbon. Often contains CHNOPS

Inorganic Compound: typically compounds without carbon Except diamond, graphite, cyanides, carbon dioxide, and carbonates Carbon forms many different compounds Carbon bonded with Carbon can form either

single, double, or triple bonds C-C C=C C=-C

Carbon always shares 4 pairs of electrons in 4 covalent bonds Carbon forms only a single bond with Hydrogen Carbon based molecules have different structures Carbon chains Straight Chained: All of the bonds occur in a straight line

C-C-C-C-C-C-C-CH-C Branched Chain: additional carbon atoms or chains are bonded to an original straight chain

(Draw the picture of a branched chain molecule) Carbon Rings Carbon molecules shaped like a ring, typically contain 5-6 carbon atoms Carbon rings containing more than 20 Carbon atoms do not naturally occur

There are different types of ring structures Benzene is the most important because many structures are based off the Benzene ring Aromatic compounds based on the Benzene structure have a strong smell Vanillin

Isomers: compounds that contain the same atoms but in different places End up with different substances because of the different structures Ex. Butane and Isobutane Ex. Retinol in eyes becomes and isomer when hit with light = triggers signal to brain = sight

Summarize 9.1 You are to summarize chapter 9 section1. Please include the following in your summary What is the importance of carbon in living things Describe how carbon can form many different compounds

Identify different structures of carbon-based molecules Demonstrate and explain how two carbon atoms can form different numbers of bonds Warm Up (3-1-16) What is the difference between organic and

inorganic molecules? Outline

Objectives Summarize 9.1 Sweet Crackers Investigate organic molecules! Objectives

Students will investigate which materials contain organic molecules by conducting the lab Students will be able to explain the difference between organic and inorganic molecules Summarize 9.1

You are to summarize chapter 9 section1. Please include the following in your summary What is the importance of carbon in living things Describe how carbon can form many different compounds Identify different structures of carbon-based molecules

Demonstrate and explain how two carbon atoms can form different numbers of bonds Organic vs. Inorganic Molecules Organic Molecules Inorganic Molecules

p. 282 Carbon in Food Prediction: Answer the question How can you see the carbon in food? Observations : You will need to make a table to write down your observations for the marshmallow and the carrot Carrot

Marshmallow p. 282 Carbon in Food What do you think? Answer the what do you think questions in your composition notebooks using complete sentences.

Sweet Crackers!! Why did this happen? Warm Up (3-2-16) What are the four major types of carbonbased compounds that are necessary for living things?

Outline Objectives Summarizing the Chapter Chapter 9 Objectives Students will be able to summarize the

importance of carbon for living things Students will be able to identify the four major types of carbon based molecules necessary for life. Students will explain the characteristics of the four major types of carbon based molecules necessary for life.

Macromolecule posters You are going to work in 4 groups to create a poster for a specific carbon-based compound necessary for life. You need to include the following on your poster

Name of your carbon compound Definition for your compound Vocab words included in your section Key ideas in your section Examples of your compound Drawings of examples of your compound Drawings of structures of your compound (if applicable)

Carbohydrates Lipids Amino Acids

Nucleic Acids Warm Up (3-3-16) Explain how organic and inorganic compounds are important for life. Be specific when identifying which compounds are organic and which are inorganic.

Give a specific example of each and explain how it is important to life. Outline Objectives 9.3 Notes 9.3 Questions

Objectives Students will be able to summarize the importance of carbon for living things Students will be able to identify the four major types of carbon based molecules necessary for life.

Students will explain the characteristics of the four major types of carbon based molecules necessary for life. 9.2 Carbon-based molecules are lifes building blocks Carbon-based molecules have many functions

in living things CHNOPS Marcomolecules very large molecules Living things contain four major types of carbon-based molecules Carbohydrates: sugars, starches, and cellulose

Contain atoms of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen Two main functions Source of chemical energy for cells in many living things Part of the structural materials of plants Lipids: include fats and oils and are used mainly for energy and as structural materials in living

things Most are made of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen Saturated fats all atoms form single bonds with each other Unsaturated fats at least one atom forms a double bond with another

Proteins: marcomolecules that are made of smaller molecules called amino acid Contain carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Also contain nitrogen, sulfur and other elements Have many different functions 20 amino acids make up all the proteins of the human body

Function of the protein depends on structure Enzyme a catalyst for a chemical reaction in living things increase rate of chemical reaction Nucleic Acids: huge, complex carbon-based molecules that contain the information that cells use to make proteins

DNA: deoxyribonucleic acid RNA: ribonucleic acid Warm Up (3-4-16) Identify how carbon is important to us as humans. Be specific and think of all of the different ways humans use carbon.

Outline Objectives Chapter 9 summaries Review Chapter 9 Objectives

Students will be able to summarize the importance of carbon for living things Students will be able to identify the four major types of carbon based molecules necessary for life. Students will explain the characteristics of the four major types of carbon based molecules

necessary for life. 9.3 Carbon-based molecules are in many materials Carbon-based compounds from ancient organisms are used to make new materials Hydrocarbon a compound made of only carbon

and hydrogen Draw the Carbon Cycle picture in your notes!! Pg. 292 9.3 Notes

Polymers contain repeating carbon-based units Polymers very large carbon-based molecules made of smaller, repeating units Monomers small repeating units linked together one after another to form a polymer Properties of a polymer depend on the size and structure of the polymer molecule which depends

both on the type of monomers it is made of and how many monomers there are Plastic a polymer that can be molded or shaped Polymer Monomer

plastic Chapter 9 Summaries What are the main points from each section? What examples do you need to add? Summary Questions

1. Section 9.1 Why can carbon atoms form a large number of molecules with different structures such as chains, rings, and isomers? 2. Section 9.2 Give an example of how each of the four carbonbased macromolecules is used in the body

3. Section 9.3 How are polymers made? Warm Up (3-7-16) Explain what the following key concepts mean. Use details from this chapter and your

notes Carbon-based molecules have many structures. Carbon-based molecules are lifes building blocks. Carbon-based molecules are in many materials. Outline Objectives

Steps for refining petroleum Objectives Students will be able to summarize the importance of carbon for living things Students will be able to identify the four major types of carbon based molecules necessary for

life. Students will explain the characteristics of the four major types of carbon based molecules necessary for life. Warm Up (3-8-16) Explain what the process is for using

petroleum. Use the three steps mentioned in your book and add in personal experiences. Outline Objectives Steps for refining petroleum

Objectives Students will be able to summarize the importance of carbon for living things Students will be able to identify the four major types of carbon based molecules necessary for life. Students will explain the characteristics of the

four major types of carbon based molecules necessary for life. Chapter 9 Summative Assessment Answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper. I want to test your knowledge and see how

well you can explain the key concepts that this chapter was about and that we talked about during this chapter. Chapter 9 Summative Assessment 1. Why can carbon atoms form a large number of molecules with different structures such as

chains, rings, and isomers? 2. Give an example of how each of the four carbon-based macromolecules is used in the body. 3. Explain how polymers are made, and include an example of a polymer.

Chapter 9 Summative Assessment Answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper in complete sentences where necessary. 1. Compare and contrast a straight chain carbon molecule from a branched chain carbon molecule. Hexane is a molecule with the formula C6H14. Draw a straight chain and a branched chain of hexane.

2. Explain how the nucleic acid DNA is involved in making proteins. Use the terms sequence, bases, and amino acids in your response. 3. Explain the process of refining petroleum. Warm Up (3-9-16) Explain what motion is in your own words.

Please give some examples of motion. Outline

Objectives Set up comp notebook Describing location (x2) p. 313 Chapter 10 motion

10.1 reading 10.1 Section Review Questions Objectives Students will identify the connection between motion and forces Students will be able to explain what motion is

and provide examples of motion Set up comp. notebooks for a new unit. Explore Location p.313 How do you describe the location of an object You will be writing all of this in your composition

notebooks 1. Choose an object in the classroom thats easy to see 2. Without pointing to, describing, or naming the object, give directions to a classmate for finding it. What do you think What kinds of information must you give another person when you are trying to describe a location?

10.1 Section Review Questions When you finish reading 10.1, please answer the section review questions in your composition notebooks using complete sentences

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