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GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS Practice General Test # 3Large Print (18 point) EditionAnswer Key for Sections 3-6Copyright 2012 by Educational Testing Service. Allrights reserved. ETS, the ETS logo, GRADUATE RECORDEXAMINATIONS, and GRE are registered trademarksof Educational Testing Service (ETS) in the United Statesand other countries.766845GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 4/24/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev00wcovers

The Graduate Record Examinations Practice General Test #3Answer Key for Section 3 - Verbal Reasoning25 Questions1. E. — clearAnswer in Context: Many find it strange that her writing isthought to be tortuous; her recent essays, although longer thanmost of her earlier essays, are extremely clear.2. E. — benignAnswer in Context: Most spacecraft are still at little risk ofcollision with space debris during their operational lifetimes,but given the numbers of new satellites launched each year,the orbital environment in the future is likely to be less benign.3. C. — a detachmentAnswer in Context: The author presents the life of Zane Greywith a detachment unusual in a biographer: he is not evenconvinced that Grey was a good writer.4. Blank (i) A. — missing fromBlank (iii) E. — commonplaceAnswer in Context: The unironic representation of objectsfrom everyday life is missing from serious American art ofthe twentieth century: “high” artists ceded the straightforwarddepiction of the commonplace to illustrators, advertisers, andpackaging designers.-2GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 9/12/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev04wcovers

5. Blank (i) A. — discussedBlank (ii) D. — disappearAnswer in Context: A newly published, laudatory biography ofGeorge Bernard Shaw fails, like others before it, to capture theessence of his personality: the more he is discussed, the morehis true self seems to disappear.6. Blank (i) C. — impudenceBlank (ii) E. — courteousAnswer in Context: Although he has long had a reputation forimpudence, his behavior toward his coworkers has alwaysbeen courteous, suggesting he may not be as insolent aspeople generally think.7. Blank (i) C. — nettlesBlank (ii) F. — observationBlank (iii) G. — contemptuousAnswer in Context: There is nothing that nettles scientistsmore than having an old problem in their field solved bysomeone from outside. If you doubt this observation,just think about the contemptuous reaction of paleontologiststo the hypothesis of Luis Alvarez—a physicist—andWalter Alvarez—a geologist—that the extinction of thedinosaurs was caused by the impact of a large meteor onthe surface of the planet.-3GRe General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 7/13/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev01wcovers

8. Blank (i) A. — casualBlank (ii) E. — plentifulBlank (iii) H. — discernAnswer in Context: If one could don magic spectacles—withlenses that make the murky depths of the ocean becometransparent—and look back several centuries to an age beforewidespread abuse of the oceans began, even the most casualobserver would quickly discover that fish were formerly muchmore abundant. Likewise, many now-depleted species ofmarine mammals would appear plentiful. But without suchspecial glasses, the differences between past and presentoceans are indeed hard to discern.9. B. — has been studied more thoroughly by historians10. D. — illustrate the wide range of people who used the civillegal system in England during that period11. B. — Because it is inaccurate, the history of civil law in earlymodern England should enrich the general historicalscholarship of that period.12. C. — is called into question by the chain of events describedin the passage-4GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 7/24/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev02wcovers

13. C. — They play only a minor role in the productivity ofsalt-marsh ecosystems.14. C. — Almost all of the officials who have served in citygovernment for any length of time are appointees ofMayor Bixby.15. Sentence to be completed: The slower-learning monkeyssearched but unintelligently: although they workedclosely together, they checked only the most obvious hidingplaces.Answer C. — cooperativelyAnswer F. — harmoniously16. Sentence to be completed: By about age eight, children’sphonetic capacities are fully developed but still ; thuschildren at that age can learn to speak a new language with anative speaker’s accent.Answer A. — plasticAnswer F. — malleable-5GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 4/24/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev00wcovers

17. Sentence to be completed: In medieval philosophy everyphysical phenomenon is presumed to have some determinatecause, leaving no place for in the explanation ofparticular events.Answer A. — happenstanceAnswer B. — chance18. Sentence to be completed: Although the film is rightly judgedimperfect by most of today’s critics, the films being createdtoday are it, since its release in 1940 provokedsufficient critical discussion to enhance the intellectualrespectability of cinema considerably.Answer A. — beholden toAnswer B. — indebted to19. Sentence to be completed: The detective’s conviction thatthere were few inept crimes in her district led her to imputesome degree of to every suspect she studied.Answer B. — acumenAnswer D. — shrewdness20. B. — perceive the odor as being less intense than it was uponfirst exposure21. A. — The exposures are of long enough duration forresearchers to investigate many aspects of olfactory adaptation.-6GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 4/24/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev00wcovers

22. C. — help illustrate how the information gathered from mostolfactory research may not be sufficient to describe the effectsof extended exposures to odors23. A. — Northern Renaissance prints should be regarded aspassive representations of their time.C. — Northern Renaissance prints provide reliable records ofcontemporary events, opinions, and beliefs.24. A. — disinterested25. C. — The compounds break down into harmless substancesafter a few months of exposure to water or air.-7GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 4/24/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev00wcovers

The Graduate Record Examinations Practice General Test #3Answer Key for Section 4 - Verbal Reasoning25 Questions1. A. — polemicalAnswer in Context: This filmmaker is not outspoken onpolitical matters: her films are known for their aestheticqualities rather than for their polemical ones.2. C. — precedenceAnswer in Context: James Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnsonis generally thought to have established Boswell as the firstgreat modern biographer; yet the claim of precedence couldbe made for Johnson himself as author of a life of RichardSavage.3. Blank (i) A. — susceptible toBlank (ii) E. — pannedAnswer in Context: Critics charge that the regulatory agency,having never defined what constitutes an untenable risk, hasgrown susceptible to outside influences on that issue: severalexperts have panned it recently for allowing one power plantto delay an inspection for more than six weeks despitecompelling safety concerns.-8GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 9/12/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev04wcovers

4. Blank (i) C. — a discontinuityBlank (ii) D. — incompatibleAnswer in Context: Television promotes a discontinuityof emotion in viewers through an unnatural evocation, everyfive minutes, of different and incompatible feelings.5. Blank (i) B. — preeminenceBlank (ii) F. — beguileAnswer in Context: Because we assume the preeminenceof natural design, nature can often beguile us: as the Wrightbrothers noted, the birds initially misled them in almost everyparticular, but their Flyer eventually succeeded by being theleast avian of the early flying machines.6. Blank (i) C. — arrogantBlank (ii) D. — pricklyBlank (iii) G. — dispelAnswer in Context: Colleagues describe Padgett as bothforthright and reticent, humble and arrogant, good-naturedand prickly. And in her behavior as a businesswoman, Padgettherself does little to dispel these contradictions. She says sheis proemployee but is avowedly antiunion. She calls herselfprocustomer but acknowledges that she runs a store withhigher profit margins and prices than almost any other grocer.-9GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 4/24/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev00wcovers

7. Blank (i) C. — banalBlank (ii) D. — consequenceBlank (iii) G. — elusiveAnswer in Context: Historical research makes two somewhatantithetical truths that sounded banal come to seem profound:knowledge of the past comes entirely from written documents,giving written words great consequence, and the morematerial you uncover, the more elusive your subject becomes.8. Blank (i) B. — underminesBlank (ii) E. — articulateBlank (iii) I. — posturingAnswer in Context: The recent publication of the painterRobert Motherwell’s substantial body of writing, as wellas writings by fellow Expressionist Barnett Newman,undermines Ann Gibson’s assertion that the AbstractExpressionists were reluctant to articulate issues of artisticmeaning in their work and suggests that this supposedreticence was perhaps more artistic posturing than historicalfact.9. E. — presenting one scholar’s explanation for a majordevelopment in Behn’s literary career10. B. — emphasize the consequences of these characters’ actionsin the private sphere-10GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 4/24/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev00wcovers

11. B. — The structure of the private sphere should not replicatethe hierarchical order of the public sphere.12. D. — assumption made by the authors of conventionaldramatic tragedies that legitimate tragic action occurs onlyin the public sphere13. A. — Failure to allow for some of the processes that influenceclimateB. — Mathematical equations that do not accurately reflectnatural phenomena14. A. — exacerbates15. D. — The development will leave sufficient forest to sustaina significant population of deer.16. Sentence to be completed: Female video artists’ rise toprominence over the past 30 years has the ascent ofvideo as an art form: it is only within the past three decadesthat video art has attained its current, respected status.Answer A. — matchedAnswer C. — paralleled-11GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 4/24/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev00wcovers

17. Sentence to be completed: The report’s most significantweakness is its assumption that the phenomenon under study is, when in reality it is limited to a specific geographicarea.Answer C. — ubiquitousAnswer E. — universal18. Sentence to be completed: The spy’s repeated bungling was,above all else, those who wished to thwart her efforts,since it was so unpredictable as to obscure any pattern thatmight otherwise lead to her capture.Answer A. — an obstacle toAnswer C. — a hindrance to19. Sentence to be completed: Each member of the journalisticpair served as the other: each refrained frompublishing a given piece if the other doubted that it was readyto be printed.Answer A. — a check onAnswer D. — a brake on20. E. — explain why the Spanish use of sugar in chocolate wasnot a sign of a need to transform chocolate-12GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 4/24/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev00wcovers

21. A. — The second (“There is a common belief that Europeansneeded to ‘transform’ chocolate to make it appetizing.”).22. A. — An article written by a biologist for the general publicsummarizing current theories about avian and dinosaurianevolutionB. — A close examination of available data on avian anddinosaurian evolution23. A. — dramatic24. E. — concede that one explanation for the prevalence of aparticular portrait type has a basis in fact25. A. — An eighteenth-century English etiquette manualdiscussing the social implications of the “hand-in” stanceC. — A passage from an eighteenth-century English novel inwhich a gentleman considers what stance to adopt when hisportrait is painted-13GRe General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 7/13/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev01wcovers

The Graduate Record Examinations Practice General Test #3Answer Key for Section 5 - Quantitative Reasoning25 Questions1. C: The two quantities are equal.2. A: Quantity A is greater.3. B: Quantity B is greater.4. C: The two quantities are equal.5. A: Quantity A is greater.6. D: The relationship cannot be determined from theinformation given.7. B: Quantity B is greater.8. B: Quantity B is greater.9. C: The two quantities are equal.10. In question 10 you were asked to enter an integer or a decimal.The answer to question 10 is 100.-14GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 9/12/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev04wcovers

11. E: -312. D: 9013. D: 14.014. In question 14 you were asked to enter a fraction. The answer14to question 14 is .515. The answer to question 15 consists of one of the answerschoices.Inequality B: x3 x16. B: 5 x 217. A: 67.6%18. The answer to question 18 consists of one of the answerchoices.C: In 2000 Germany’s gasoline tax revenue was more than3 times its tobacco tax revenue.19. C: 30%20. E: 50 billion-15GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 6/18/2012 LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev05wcovers

21. C: 8722. B: 2423. D:4724. The answer to question 24 consists of all six of the answerchoices.A: 1B: 2C: 3D: 4E: 5F: 625. B: 30,000-16GRE General Practice Test 3[This footer should NOT be printed.] 4/24/12LT18-AnswerKeysSec3-6 rev00wcovers

The Graduate Record Examinations Practice General Test #3Answer Key for Section 6 - Quantitative Reasoning25 Questions1. C: The two quantities are equal.2. B: Quantity B is greater.3. B: Quantity B is greater.4. D: The relationship cannot be determined from theinformation given.5. D: The relationship cannot be determin